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KnightFalz

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KnightFalz
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  • Bad first impressions

    Quizzical said:
    SlyLoK said:
    I don't understand this thread... Purchasing Summerset gets you the entire game minus the smaller DLC.

    Purchasing the standard gives you the base game and not Morrowind or Summerset I do believe. 

    ESO Plus gives you the smaller DLC and Orsinium. Morrowind may be included in that now I'm not sure.

    Everything is user error it seems.
    Purchasing the standard edition and also ESO Plus gives you the base game and several DLC game packs, including Morrowind but not Summerset.  The problem is that their site promised that ESO Plus gets you access to all of the DLC game packs.  It doesn't quite explicitly state that you get Summerset, too, but it does very strongly imply it if you don't already know from other sources that it doesn't.  Maybe a veteran player would know that, but someone new to the game probably wouldn't, and people buying the game for the first time are by definition the latter.

    That's not user error.  That's false advertising.  There is a difference.

    The false advertising is only one of the reasons that the game gave me a bad first impression.  That the new player experience is so egregiously awful in a lot of different ways is why I created this thread.  The nearest comparison that I can think of where another MMORPG just dumped me into the game world with no guidance on what to do was Trove, and even that was due to an outright bug where high game window resolutions make nearly all text vanish--including the tutorial text that would have explained what to do.  With ESO, the lack of a tutorial seems to be intentional.
    The information as to what is which is readily available and located under the large, bolded links DLC/UPDATES and JOIN ESO PLUS on their site.

    Further, game content comes in two forms, DLCs and Chapters, as noted on the DLC/Updates page. DLCs are by default included in ESO Plus. Chapters are not, by default. This is likely because chapters are much larger additions to the game in terms of scope and content.

    Originally Morrowind also required separate purchase. It may be that as new chapters are released, older ones will be absorbed into the base package. Time will tell in that regard.

    In any case. this isn't a case of false advertising, but of absent or inadequate comprehension on your part.
    YashaX
  • Innovation

    AlBQuirky said:
    Someone mentioned GW2's questing. If I recall correctly, one still had to speak to the quest giver afterwards to receive their "special reward" and shop at their "special shop." Basically, this innovation removed the "tedious" running back and forth and role playing aspect of actually speaking with an NPC.

    GW2's dynamic events was fun at first, then annoying. I only played a little and saw many, many players totally ignore dynamic events. I quickly understood why after escorting the caravan for the tenth time while running to my next area of interest.

    Someone else mentioned WoW, but it rarely innovates, just implements better.

    What are the basics of MMOs and what can be "innovated" without changing the genre (besides graphics...)?  (Is this a whole new thread?)
    You recall incorrectly. The currency reward was delivered remotely. You only had to return to the NPC if you wished to buy something at that shop. Otherwise, you could use it any any shop that accepted it.

    If you wish to return to quest givers as role-play you are free to do so. Those that see that as tedious busywork are free to carry on adventuring.

    Repeating the same dynamic event will get old quickly, which may explain why many you saw chose to largely ignore them.

    WoW innovated to the point where the vast majority of MMORPGs that came after followed as closely in their footsteps as possible for quite some time. I suppose it feels old hat now that virtually everyone has been doing it a long while, but WoW started it all and many feel it continues to be the best at it.

    VR may be able to advance MMORPGs to a groundbreaking level once it reaches a point of sufficient sophistication, but such is the province of fiction for now.

    Otherwise, innovations will come in small doses that for the most part will be minor tweaks of what has been about for some time.

    I've seen some talk of trying to make the game world dynamically change in response to collective player action. If that works out it could freshen up things a bit.
    AlBQuirky
  • Innovation

    jusomdude said:
    RIFT introduced randomly spawning dimensional breaches ranging from solo to small group sized, to region spanning invasions, to make the world more dynamic and provide opportunity for spontaneous grouping. They also introduced modular ability tree selection, that allow you to select three trees from the pool of those available for your class, adding a higher degree of customization than is otherwise typical.

    GW2 did away with the need to seek out quest givers to both get and turn in missions, made travel times negligible, and generally eliminating or reducing tedious MMORPG elements. They also introduced a system where your combat abilities varied greatly depending on your equipped weapons, adding an atypical layer of customization.

    ESO uses scaling to eliminate the structured flow of many MMORPGs that require you to proceed through content along a strict path where your choices are largely limited by level, instead allowing players to adventure where they want regardless.

    These aren't "invention of the printing press" scale innovations, but each brought something new to the table that caused them to stand out from their fellows.
    I guess these are slight improvement and tweaks that are good QoL improvements except maybe the Rift changes which were a little more original. I liked the rifts when I first played Rift. Although nothing here can really be called an innovation since they did nothing to disrupt or really change how MMOs are played. I'd say these are mostly "another wick on the candle" changes.

    I don't have answers as to what they could do to really refresh the MMO genre but I know that I'm getting real tired of playing mostly the same game with a different title and skin since the invention of the MMO
    Slight improvements are the general process of innovation. Major innovations that produce ground breaking change are few and far between. If one only counts the major ones they are doomed to see nothing but stagnation for great lengths of time.
    Phaserlightcraftseeker
  • Innovation

    RIFT introduced randomly spawning dimensional breaches ranging from solo to small group sized, to region spanning invasions, to make the world more dynamic and provide opportunity for spontaneous grouping. They also introduced modular ability tree selection, that allow you to select three trees from the pool of those available for your class, adding a higher degree of customization than is otherwise typical.

    GW2 did away with the need to seek out quest givers to both get and turn in missions, made travel times negligible, and generally eliminating or reducing tedious MMORPG elements. They also introduced a system where your combat abilities varied greatly depending on your equipped weapons, adding an atypical layer of customization.

    ESO uses scaling to eliminate the structured flow of many MMORPGs that require you to proceed through content along a strict path where your choices are largely limited by level, instead allowing players to adventure where they want regardless.

    These aren't "invention of the printing press" scale innovations, but each brought something new to the table that caused them to stand out from their fellows.
    Octagon7711CryomatrixPhaserlightUngoodcraftseeker
  • Can an online match only based game be a MMO?

    Gutlard said:
    If we're so hard pressed to label things, do we stamp out the evolution of the things?
    It has the potential to stamp out the recognition of that evolution in some, though the process will inexorably continue regardless.
    Torval