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cheyane

About

Username
cheyane
Joined
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Member
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Epic
Favorite Role
Healer
Currently Playing
Everquest 2
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42
  • It's Not a Perfect Game, But It's a Lot of Fun - Warhammer 40K: Inquisitor Martyr Review - MMORPG.co

    I found some of the bosses had insane regen and the fights just dragged and the grind got to me so I stopped playing for now.
    TorvalthunderC
  • MMORPG.com : General : 7 Ways Assassin's Creed Odyssey is Mass Effect in Ancient Greece

    I will definitely pick this game up but worried the combat might be too hard for me.
    blueturtle13
  • The effect of Guild Politics on the MMO genre?

    The worse guild experience I had was in Everquest. It sickened me to death that I contributed to it by being silent.

    Everquest was the very first online game I ever played and because I wanted to advance when I got the opportunity to join the biggest guild on my server run by a petty child in an adult's body who used his guild as an instrument of revenge and purposely blocked others from accessing content. He was mean and successful and had very talented people and we had several server firsts.

    The only thing I could do was help members from other guilds to port them since I was a wizard and even though he tried to forbade me I just went ahead and did it. I always joked and acted stupid and got away with it partly because I was a female they had spoken to on the phone so he never disciplined me although he threatened to several times.

    I helped corpse recovery in the Planes whenever I could I even managed to get some guild clerics to do rezzes for these smaller guilds but it always rubbed me the wrong way how 2 large  guilds could monopolize the content and divide the dragons between them. It smacked of absolute greed and was so wrong and unfair that to this day I hate open world content because of how it could be monopolized by stronger guilds.

    I saw so much hatred for our guild and when people realised which guild I belonged to they would be unfriendly until they got to know me better. We took over whole dungeons and kept the dungeons to the members of the guild only and we were very well equipped.

    You may ask why I never left. Well I wanted to do the content. I know I am as guilty as him I guess like they say all it takes is for good men to do nothing.
    KyleranBeatnik59
  • Part 2 - Everquest - TheHiveLeader - EverQuest Videos - MMORPG.com

    Yes grouping was what kept me playing Everquest. What is missing in modern games is what makes a game like Everquest still one of the most memorable game experiences of my life.
    MadCoderOneScotXodic
  • Players are concerned about monthly "skin sales".

    Iselin said:
    Iselin said:
    It's better than selling actual items of power, so I wouldn't sabre-rattle about it too much, if I were backers.
    This is true but they're also not completely harmless. Selling cosmetics does a few things that can negatively impact a game:

    1. The financial incentive to sell it instead of letting players earn it tends to lower the quantity and quality of those sort of items that can be earned in parallel to the cash shop offerings.
    2. That same incentive prompts developers to overdo the quantity of available skins since they are so easy to develop and sell and they go to progressively more and more ridiculous extremes with those skins that are quite often incongruous with the rest of the game's setting and lore.
    3. By the same token it creates a disincentive to work on core game play since that core takes a lot more work and effort for lower returns compared to the easy to do skins.
    4. It also attracts a different type of player to the games that go heavily down this route. It attracts the "Sims Online" and "Second Life" crowd that obsesses about collecting all those different outfits as their primary reason for being there. That crowd quickly becomes the most valued customer since the developer's metrics will show they're willing to spend much more than the ones who are there to quest and kill. They become overt time, the primary development target reinforcing points 1-3 above in a vicious cycle

    It does, but again, good luck getting players to amount an offensive against cosmetics like we saw against EA with lootbox progression.  You saw just how atrocious that had to be to even garner a response worth noting by EA/Disney (literal "you fire 20% faster, your starship is 20% more manueverable" etc.).  Apathy will win the day here.

    I don't enjoy buying cosmetics, so I don't do it.  But, considering how cheap and easy it is to crank them out, from a business perspecrive, you'd gotta be outta your damn mind to skip it.
    I don't know about mounting offensives but I do know that dismissing their impact on the game on the usual basis that "it's just cosmetics" misses a large part of what it does to games that go heavily down this easy money route.

    It's not like there aren't any examples of sub-only MMOs we can look at and compare their clear game development focus vs. the ones that go heavily into "got be out of your damn mind to skip it" land. IDK but WOW seemed to be doing just fine last I looked despite being apparently nuts to leave all that other extra money behind.
    I look at the amount of people in Path of Exile I see running about with costumes or spell effects they bought from the cash shop and it works. People buy it. 

    A company like Grinding Gears Games do develop their game diligently. Of course that may not be the case in every other game but a game that is free to play has to make money. I cannot vouch for the fact that they do not spend more time on the cash shop items but perhaps companies can employ another team for that and not stinge on the resources that are already stretched thin.

    You as a player have to understand that and accept the consequences of playing for free.
    MadFrenchie