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Raph Koster's back

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  • Hawkaya399Hawkaya399 Member UncommonPosts: 582
    edited October 2019
    Mendel said:
    I don't get the whole "It's Raph Koster, let's invest in him" thing.  That seems a lure for the crowdfunding dollar.  Professional investors invest in proven businessmen; they hire game designers.  Raph may be a god among game designers, but how is he at running a business?  That's what the investment community will be looking for.



    I've always been intrigued by his influence in games. I think of sandbox MMORPGs. And I've always favored them. UO. SWG. Evne some work in MUDs. His way of approaching a MMO seems more geared to nonlinear things than the traditional. This is the realm of gaming and MMO's that has always been the pinnacle of wonder and inspiriation for me as a gamer and coder. It's not how fun something is, it's how amazingly lifelike or immersive it can be. Honestly, I'm as drawn to simulations too. Far more than just conventional game design or games in general. Normal games to sim-games are like campfire stories to building an actual spaceship and traveling to Mars.

    That's why DWarf Fortress is still one of the most amazing games I know of, even though its grahpics are essentially ASCI. It's a huge sim. It even simulates the history of the world. Everything that exists in the world the player starts in was grown from a petri dish. And everything that happens after is including the influences of the player. Therer'e so many interacting forces, it's unpredictable what'll happen. And that's what can make it so amazing. And not amazing because it's random, but because there's a pattern to things, a cause and effect. It's just so much happening that you can't know the end result. Like real life almost. They succeeded in making more than just a game.

    I also think unless we can learn to harness procedural generation even more than we have already, far more,  our worlds are going to shrink versus expectations, or increase astronomically in cost. The reason is fidelity is increasing and it's more expensive by the moment to keep up in development. And by the use of the term fidelity I mean, roughly realism. It's one thing to make a sprite project in a 3d world, like with trees that only ever show one face, but another entirely to make a fully 3d high polygon model, with all of the requisite textures and shading and other elements. The richer these worlds become, the more we're going to be reliant on computers to generate them. And yes this means we need to understand how things come together. To some extent, this means we have to simulate some things, or at least use deep learning to create environments and npc interrelationships in the world. I think there's a great future in deep learning and generating game worlds. Give the learning engine enough data, and it might mine enough things to generate massive worlds believable and interesting enough for players to enjoy. This will cut costs and allow worlds to grow, not shrink.
    Post edited by Hawkaya399 on
  • AmarantharAmaranthar Member EpicPosts: 4,242
    It's been posted in news articles around, but I didn't know it until a few days ago. 
    He's just getting started so there's no info other than the $2.7 million seed money, and a few top hires. 

    I'm extremely excited. Not only is Raph experienced and very knowledgeable, this is his own company and he doesn't have to follow orders from above, or work with others who don't see eye to eye with him on "Sandbox Worlds." 

    I've been waiting for this for a long time. 

    https://www.playableworlds.com/about  


    I thought he was working wioth Crowfall.
    He was a consultant. With other companies, too, from what he said on his blog a few years ago. 

    Once upon a time....

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