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Want to buy new computer, now or later, tariffs?

CryomatrixCryomatrix Member EpicPosts: 2,960
So ive decided to buy a real gaming computer cuz i enjoy streaming. I told myself ill do it when i reach twitch affiliate, however, that may take at least 6 weeks.

This is a silly question, but should i buy because the tariffs on mexico may increase the price, or mexico tariffs have nothing to do with it.

Please no politics, just wondering.
Catch me streaming at twitch.tv/cryomatrix
You can see my sci-fi/WW2 book recommendations. 

Comments

  • AmatheAmathe Member LegendaryPosts: 7,381
    The U.S.'s three biggest imports from Mexico are cars, tech, and produce. We import tech equipment, including $26 billion of computers and computer parts, semiconductors and software.  

    So yes, it is likely to affect prices (if it actually happens). 
    MadFrenchieOzmodan

    EQ1, EQ2, SWG, SWTOR, GW, GW2 CoH, CoV, FFXI, WoW, CO, War,TSW and a slew of free trials and beta tests

  • MadFrenchieMadFrenchie Member LegendaryPosts: 8,505
    edited June 2019
    Amathe said:
    The U.S.'s three biggest imports from Mexico are cars, tech, and produce. We import tech equipment, including $26 billion of computers and computer parts, semiconductors and software.  

    So yes, it is likely to affect prices (if it actually happens). 
    It is highly likely to happen.  The US articulated no verifiable goals for Mexico to meet to avoid the tariffs.  The threat seems more like an announcement than any true conditional statement by the admin.  There's no "reduce illegal crossings by X%" for Mexico to even try to meet to show they're acquiescing to the demand.

    So yes, prices will very likely go up in the near future for import items from Mexico.

    Take from that what you will with regards to your situation and predicament @Cryomatrix.

    image
  • CleffyCleffy Member RarePosts: 6,250
    I think now is a good time to build a pc if you want it cheap and capable. The tariffs on Mexico won't be the problem. It's the tariffs on China that will.
    There really isn't much to lose except running a generation old. Get a Ryzen 2xxx, NVidia 1080ti, nVME and your set. Dram should also be cheap right now due to pressure on Huawei.
  • SandmanjwSandmanjw Member UncommonPosts: 258
    Making that choice because of possible 5% tariff's  are not a wise one. 

    There are always sales of some type pretty much every week, on pretty much everything. Just as there are always politics going on somewhere in the world as well.

    Just ask for help when you have the cash/budget in hand and you will get several choices more than likely.  Got to remember that these companies most likely have stock on most items and any issues will be a few weeks in the future of any actions like tariff's.

    You are just as likely to run into issues with crypto miners or natural disasters or tech issues as tariff's...so just shop when it is time and make your choices then.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,099
    Mexico tariffs won't affect computer parts much, as we don't buy that from Mexico.  China tariffs will and do affect prices a lot, as assembling parts is commonly done in China.  That production generally can be moved out of China, but it takes time to do so, and will likely be more expensive to assemble parts elsewhere.

    Cases, motherboards, and power supplies are likely to be hit heaviest by China tariffs.  CPUs shouldn't be affected.  GPUs, memory, and SSDs could be assembled in China, but most of the value is in chips fabricated elsewhere.  That's easier to move elsewhere than parts where much more of the value is in the process of actually soldering things together.
    Ozmodan
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,099
    Amathe said:
    The U.S.'s three biggest imports from Mexico are cars, tech, and produce. We import tech equipment, including $26 billion of computers and computer parts, semiconductors and software.  

    So yes, it is likely to affect prices (if it actually happens). 
    If you're buying a prebuilt computer, than Mexico tariffs might affect that.  But for individual components to build your own, I'm not aware of anything at all that we import from Mexico.  I could believe that there are some things, but it's not common.
    Ozmodan
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,099
    Amathe said:
    The U.S.'s three biggest imports from Mexico are cars, tech, and produce. We import tech equipment, including $26 billion of computers and computer parts, semiconductors and software.  

    So yes, it is likely to affect prices (if it actually happens). 
    It is highly likely to happen.  The US articulated no verifiable goals for Mexico to meet to avoid the tariffs.  The threat seems more like an announcement than any true conditional statement by the admin.  There's no "reduce illegal crossings by X%" for Mexico to even try to meet to show they're acquiescing to the demand.

    So yes, prices will very likely go up in the near future for import items from Mexico.

    Take from that what you will with regards to your situation and predicament @Cryomatrix.
    I don't see the Mexico tariffs as likely to take effect.  Basically, some people from Central America want to leave their country and go somewhere that they could have a better life.  Mexico used to stop them at their southern border.  Now Mexico has moved to just sending them through to the USA and letting it be our problem.  Trump basically wants Mexico to go back to stopping them at their southern border.  It seems like the sort of thing where a deal can be made--and possibly even one that makes Mexico no worse off than if Trump simply canceled the tariffs in exchange for nothing.

    China is a much tougher case.  Basically, China has decided that they should be allowed to steal IP from elsewhere in the world, manufacture counterfeit goods there, and sell those counterfeit goods to the rest of the world.  Previous administrations complained, but basically shrugged it off and said there's nothing we can do about it.  Trump is basically saying that we're going to do something about it, even if we don't have a particularly good way to stop it.

    The problem is that industrial-scale piracy and counterfeiting is such a large part of China's economic strategy that it would be a huge shift for them to stop.  They also don't believe that they need to.  They've been doing it without repercussions for so many decades that they expect that the US will lose interest in the topic and let them go back to what they were doing.

    So basically, I think that the Mexico tariffs either won't happen at all or will only briefly take effect before a deal is made.  Such a deal might be a mostly cosmetic thing that allows Trump to claim victory and move on.  But China tariffs are going to be at least off and on for as long as Trump is president, and possibly beyond.  China's current dictator is sufficiently inclined to cause trouble that it's really not that hard to imagine whoever our next president deciding to smack China over one issue or another.
  • GruugGruug Member RarePosts: 1,733
    So, when taxes go up it is a bad thing?

    Let's party like it is 1863!

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,099
    Gruug said:
    So, when taxes go up it is a bad thing?

    People tend to prefer that taxes that they pay personally go down, while taxes that only affect other people (especially people that they personally dislike) go up to compensate.
  • OzmodanOzmodan Member EpicPosts: 9,726
    Amathe said:
    The U.S.'s three biggest imports from Mexico are cars, tech, and produce. We import tech equipment, including $26 billion of computers and computer parts, semiconductors and software.  

    So yes, it is likely to affect prices (if it actually happens). 
    Since when do computer parts come from Mexico?

  • VrikaVrika Member EpicPosts: 6,425
    Quizzical said:
    Amathe said:
    The U.S.'s three biggest imports from Mexico are cars, tech, and produce. We import tech equipment, including $26 billion of computers and computer parts, semiconductors and software.  

    So yes, it is likely to affect prices (if it actually happens). 
    If you're buying a prebuilt computer, than Mexico tariffs might affect that.  But for individual components to build your own, I'm not aware of anything at all that we import from Mexico.  I could believe that there are some things, but it's not common.
    Even if something were imported from Mexico, equal parts could be easily imported from somewhere else.

    A trade war with China on the other hand could really increase the prices.
     
  • CryomatrixCryomatrix Member EpicPosts: 2,960
    Interesting and insightful comments . . .
    Ridelynn
    Catch me streaming at twitch.tv/cryomatrix
    You can see my sci-fi/WW2 book recommendations. 
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