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Upgrading my graphics card?

ArteriusArterius Member EpicPosts: 2,832
So I bought a pre-built desktop and want to upgrade my graphics card with my upcoming tax return. The rest of the computer is pretty good and shouldn't need to be upgraded. However the graphics card is a NVIDA 1060 3gb and it holds my computer down.

Just wondering what graphics card people on here recommend. I am not good with computers which is why I bought a pre-built computer in the first place. I know nothing about parts.

Currently playing: Outer Worlds (Xbox One X)

Currently Reading: Skaven Slayer (Gotrek and Felix Book 2)

Currently Writing: Champions of Legend Book 1 (3rd Draft)

Currently Watching: Oz (Season 4), Soprano's (Season 1)


Comments

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,088
    My advice would be, don't try to upgrade a pre-built desktop.  To turn it into a respectable gaming machine, you'll end up replacing so many things that you might as well just build a new computer and leave the old one intact.  Buying one new part to replace an old part that failed is a different matter, but that doesn't seem like it's your goal.

    For that matter, given a pre-built desktop with a GTX 1060, I suspect that the video card isn't the first thing that I'd look to upgrade.  But enough of the speculation.  Post your exact system specs.  If you have to open up the case and read labels to find out what you have, then do it.  In particular, replacing the video card without knowing what power supply you have is a bad idea.
  • ArteriusArterius Member EpicPosts: 2,832
    Currently playing: Outer Worlds (Xbox One X)

    Currently Reading: Skaven Slayer (Gotrek and Felix Book 2)

    Currently Writing: Champions of Legend Book 1 (3rd Draft)

    Currently Watching: Oz (Season 4), Soprano's (Season 1)


  • t0nydt0nyd Member UncommonPosts: 510
    What resolution are you playing at? You're playing at 1080p then you're processor might be holding you back. If you're playing it 1440p your video card might be holding you back. What is your FPS Target? Are you going for 60 hertz or 144?
    Ozmodan
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,088
    Arterius said:
    That's actually better than I was expecting.  The critical components to allow an upgrade are the power supply and case, and those aren't listed.  To summarize the machine for anyone else who wants to know, it's probably built by HP and offers:

    Core i7-8700
    16 GB DDR4 memory, likely clocked at 2666 MHz; HP lists Kingston HyperX at 2666 MHz on their site now
    GeForce GTX 1060 3 GB
    128 GB Western Digital Green SSD (low end as SSDs go, but a real SSD)
    1 TB Western Digital Blue hard drive
    Windows 10 Home, 64-bit

    The monitor is probably this:
    https://store.hp.com/us/en/pdp/omen-by-hp-25-display-p-z7y57aa-aba-1
    1920x1080 resolution
    60 Hz; probably a 144 Hz monitor, but you're running it at 60 Hz
    25" diagonal
    TN panel

    My recommended upgrade for you is to set your monitor refresh rate to 144 Hz.

    1.  Right-click on the desktop
    2.  Click "Display Settings"
    3.  Click "Advanced display settings"
    4.  Click "Display adapter properties for Display 1"
    5.  Click the "Monitor" tab
    6.  In the "Screen refresh rate" drop down, change it from 60 Hz to 144 Hz.

    That's nothing more than using your hardware for what it's built to do.  A higher monitor refresh rate allows more granularity in the frame rate shown.  You might also want to look into enabling adaptive sync now that Nvidia finally decided to support it after four years of dragging their feet.  That will probably require a video driver upgrade.

    That might not give the performance that you were hoping for, but using your hardware for what it's built to do might be as good to your eyes as increasing your frame rate by 20% would have been.  And it's free.

    If you do want to go the hardware upgrade route, then we'll have to know what else you have.  First, what power supply?  It's probably adequate for the video card you have, but any upgrade that you might want will probably use a lot more power than your current card, so the power supply might not be able to handle it.  You don't want to spend $500 on a video card that fries the entire computer.

    While you're in there, check to see how long of a video card the case can hold.  A ruler or measuring tape could tell you that.  There's no sense in buying some video card only to find that it can't fit because it's half an inch too long.  Also count how many case fans you have, and report their sizes.  The common sizes are 80 mm, 120 mm, and 140 mm.  The airflow is designed to be adequate for the video card you have, but might not be adequate for one that puts out a lot more heat.
  • ArteriusArterius Member EpicPosts: 2,832
    edited February 2019
    Quizzical said:
    Arterius said:
    That's actually better than I was expecting.  The critical components to allow an upgrade are the power supply and case, and those aren't listed.  To summarize the machine for anyone else who wants to know, it's probably built by HP and offers:

    Core i7-8700
    16 GB DDR4 memory, likely clocked at 2666 MHz; HP lists Kingston HyperX at 2666 MHz on their site now
    GeForce GTX 1060 3 GB
    128 GB Western Digital Green SSD (low end as SSDs go, but a real SSD)
    1 TB Western Digital Blue hard drive
    Windows 10 Home, 64-bit

    The monitor is probably this:
    https://store.hp.com/us/en/pdp/omen-by-hp-25-display-p-z7y57aa-aba-1
    1920x1080 resolution
    60 Hz; probably a 144 Hz monitor, but you're running it at 60 Hz
    25" diagonal
    TN panel

    My recommended upgrade for you is to set your monitor refresh rate to 144 Hz.

    1.  Right-click on the desktop
    2.  Click "Display Settings"
    3.  Click "Advanced display settings"
    4.  Click "Display adapter properties for Display 1"
    5.  Click the "Monitor" tab
    6.  In the "Screen refresh rate" drop down, change it from 60 Hz to 144 Hz.

    That's nothing more than using your hardware for what it's built to do.  A higher monitor refresh rate allows more granularity in the frame rate shown.  You might also want to look into enabling adaptive sync now that Nvidia finally decided to support it after four years of dragging their feet.  That will probably require a video driver upgrade.

    That might not give the performance that you were hoping for, but using your hardware for what it's built to do might be as good to your eyes as increasing your frame rate by 20% would have been.  And it's free.

    If you do want to go the hardware upgrade route, then we'll have to know what else you have.  First, what power supply?  It's probably adequate for the video card you have, but any upgrade that you might want will probably use a lot more power than your current card, so the power supply might not be able to handle it.  You don't want to spend $500 on a video card that fries the entire computer.

    While you're in there, check to see how long of a video card the case can hold.  A ruler or measuring tape could tell you that.  There's no sense in buying some video card only to find that it can't fit because it's half an inch too long.  Also count how many case fans you have, and report their sizes.  The common sizes are 80 mm, 120 mm, and 140 mm.  The airflow is designed to be adequate for the video card you have, but might not be adequate for one that puts out a lot more heat.
    Wow. Putting 144 HZ made a lot of difference. Night and Day. I am not really sure what changed but everything seems to pop a lot more now. Its pretty amazing. I could see a major difference just on my screensaver alone. I will do that tomorrow.

    To be fair its not that my graphics card is even bad. I can play most games I throw at it at high or even ultra if I want to set the FPS to 30. There are only a few games that Medium is required that I have thrown at it like Ark but i think its because that game is more terrible optimized. I was just curious because I always here people playing at ultra settings, 4k. I know my monitor doesn't have 4k but still. 

    Thanks for all the help by the way @Quizzical
    Currently playing: Outer Worlds (Xbox One X)

    Currently Reading: Skaven Slayer (Gotrek and Felix Book 2)

    Currently Writing: Champions of Legend Book 1 (3rd Draft)

    Currently Watching: Oz (Season 4), Soprano's (Season 1)


  • xD_GamingxD_Gaming Member EpicPosts: 2,663
    just so it is out theore, AMD Vega 64 's are very cheap right now.
    There is a multiverse inside our minds which millions live.
    Twitter : @xD_Gaming_Merch
    xD Merch : https://bit.ly/2v13MT8
    "Dragons are tilly folly !"
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,088
    Do look into updating your video driver and then enabling adaptive sync.  That will make your frame rates feel better in games, too.

    With a 60 Hz monitor, if you have vertical sync on, your frame rates are basically 60, 30, 20, or lower.  So if the video card can't maintain 60, it drops all the way to 30.  With a 144 Hz monitor, possible effective frame rates displayed are 144, 72, 48, 36, 28.8, 24, or various lower things.  That gives you considerably more granularity.  That way, if your video card can crank out 50 frames per second, you see 48 rather than 30.  If it can put out 40 frames per second, you see 36 rather than 30.

    Better yet is having adaptive sync on.  That way, if your video card can put out 50 frames per second, you see 50.  If it can do 40 frames per second, you see 40.  No tearing, and no intermittent idle while waiting for the next frame display time.  Also no judder that you'd get from triple buffering.  Some monitors that nominally support adaptive sync don't have a very good implementation of it, but you can try it and see how it goes.  It probably won't be worse than leaving it off, and might be a lot better.

    The first hardware upgrade I'd look into for that computer is a bigger SSD--in addition to the old one, not as a replacement for it.  Hopefully HP installed the OS on your SSD, but 120 GB just isn't very much space for installing games, especially when Windows will want a lot of that.  Add a 500 GB SSD for $70 or so and you'll have plenty of space to store games and any other programs you use.  That won't often improve your frame rates, but it will make games load a lot faster.  An SSD uses very little power, so it doesn't bring the power and cooling issues that a video card upgrade would.
    Arterius
  • ArteriusArterius Member EpicPosts: 2,832
    edited February 2019
    Quizzical said:
    Do look into updating your video driver and then enabling adaptive sync.  That will make your frame rates feel better in games, too.

    With a 60 Hz monitor, if you have vertical sync on, your frame rates are basically 60, 30, 20, or lower.  So if the video card can't maintain 60, it drops all the way to 30.  With a 144 Hz monitor, possible effective frame rates displayed are 144, 72, 48, 36, 28.8, 24, or various lower things.  That gives you considerably more granularity.  That way, if your video card can crank out 50 frames per second, you see 48 rather than 30.  If it can put out 40 frames per second, you see 36 rather than 30.

    Better yet is having adaptive sync on.  That way, if your video card can put out 50 frames per second, you see 50.  If it can do 40 frames per second, you see 40.  No tearing, and no intermittent idle while waiting for the next frame display time.  Also no judder that you'd get from triple buffering.  Some monitors that nominally support adaptive sync don't have a very good implementation of it, but you can try it and see how it goes.  It probably won't be worse than leaving it off, and might be a lot better.

    The first hardware upgrade I'd look into for that computer is a bigger SSD--in addition to the old one, not as a replacement for it.  Hopefully HP installed the OS on your SSD, but 120 GB just isn't very much space for installing games, especially when Windows will want a lot of that.  Add a 500 GB SSD for $70 or so and you'll have plenty of space to store games and any other programs you use.  That won't often improve your frame rates, but it will make games load a lot faster.  An SSD uses very little power, so it doesn't bring the power and cooling issues that a video card upgrade would.
    I'll do that. Also turned on Adaptive Sync and while I was in the Nvidia control panal noticied that my monitor wasn't even set to 1080p. So I changed that too. Logged into MHW which I was only getting about 45 frames in. I am now getting 60. Don't know if those two things should have changed FPS or if it was something else but I am not complaining.

    Game is running on Ultra as well. So thanks @Quizzical and I will get back to you with the rest tomorrow
    Currently playing: Outer Worlds (Xbox One X)

    Currently Reading: Skaven Slayer (Gotrek and Felix Book 2)

    Currently Writing: Champions of Legend Book 1 (3rd Draft)

    Currently Watching: Oz (Season 4), Soprano's (Season 1)


  • jitter77jitter77 Member UncommonPosts: 344
    The main thing is the motherboard.  I upgraded my HP computer and it turned into a nightmare.  I upgraded to an R9270x and even though it should have worked it did not.  After searching around other had tried to upgrade the GPU and had the same issue.  So I bought a new motherboard.  None of the headers on the new standard MB matched HPs.  I literally had to short out pins with a screw driver to turn my PC on.  I bought a standard power header which just kinda hangs on the side of my case now, but I also have some USB ports and what not that do not work.  It can be fixed, but it is a pain.  Also my new GPU was longer / wider and I had to buy 90 degree SATA cables to fit the card in the case.  By the time everything was done I spent almost as much on the MOBO / accessories than I did for the card.  You may not have any issues, but I would research your motherboard before you buy a new GPU. 
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,088
    Arterius said:
    Quizzical said:
    Do look into updating your video driver and then enabling adaptive sync.  That will make your frame rates feel better in games, too.

    With a 60 Hz monitor, if you have vertical sync on, your frame rates are basically 60, 30, 20, or lower.  So if the video card can't maintain 60, it drops all the way to 30.  With a 144 Hz monitor, possible effective frame rates displayed are 144, 72, 48, 36, 28.8, 24, or various lower things.  That gives you considerably more granularity.  That way, if your video card can crank out 50 frames per second, you see 48 rather than 30.  If it can put out 40 frames per second, you see 36 rather than 30.

    Better yet is having adaptive sync on.  That way, if your video card can put out 50 frames per second, you see 50.  If it can do 40 frames per second, you see 40.  No tearing, and no intermittent idle while waiting for the next frame display time.  Also no judder that you'd get from triple buffering.  Some monitors that nominally support adaptive sync don't have a very good implementation of it, but you can try it and see how it goes.  It probably won't be worse than leaving it off, and might be a lot better.

    The first hardware upgrade I'd look into for that computer is a bigger SSD--in addition to the old one, not as a replacement for it.  Hopefully HP installed the OS on your SSD, but 120 GB just isn't very much space for installing games, especially when Windows will want a lot of that.  Add a 500 GB SSD for $70 or so and you'll have plenty of space to store games and any other programs you use.  That won't often improve your frame rates, but it will make games load a lot faster.  An SSD uses very little power, so it doesn't bring the power and cooling issues that a video card upgrade would.
    I'll do that. Also turned on Adaptive Sync and while I was in the Nvidia control panal noticied that my monitor wasn't even set to 1080p. So I changed that too. Logged into MHW which I was only getting about 45 frames in. I am now getting 60. Don't know if those two things should have changed FPS or if it was something else but I am not complaining.

    Game is running on Ultra as well. So thanks @Quizzical and I will get back to you with the rest tomorrow
    In that case, I suspect that a bad video driver was at least a contributing factor to your problems.  There's a decent chance that HP shipped your computer with the oldest driver that supported your video card, and never updated it, even if you bought the computer a year later.  If you didn't update the driver yourself, then you had missed out on a lot of driver optimizations that would have increased performance.  A game as popular as Monster Hunter World is likely to get game-specific optimizations to eek out a little more performance, too.  If you already had the latest video driver, then I don't have a good explanation for what you observed.

    For what it's worth, from your original post, I half expected you to have some $600 fire hazard from Wal-Mart that would be basically impossible to upgrade.  That's not what you have; you bought something from HP more focused on gaming.  Still, when you get something from a big OEM like that, they'll make sure that their parts work with each other, but they might not be as compatible with other parts as you'd like.
    Arterius
  • ArteriusArterius Member EpicPosts: 2,832
    Quizzical said:
    Arterius said:
    Quizzical said:
    Do look into updating your video driver and then enabling adaptive sync.  That will make your frame rates feel better in games, too.

    With a 60 Hz monitor, if you have vertical sync on, your frame rates are basically 60, 30, 20, or lower.  So if the video card can't maintain 60, it drops all the way to 30.  With a 144 Hz monitor, possible effective frame rates displayed are 144, 72, 48, 36, 28.8, 24, or various lower things.  That gives you considerably more granularity.  That way, if your video card can crank out 50 frames per second, you see 48 rather than 30.  If it can put out 40 frames per second, you see 36 rather than 30.

    Better yet is having adaptive sync on.  That way, if your video card can put out 50 frames per second, you see 50.  If it can do 40 frames per second, you see 40.  No tearing, and no intermittent idle while waiting for the next frame display time.  Also no judder that you'd get from triple buffering.  Some monitors that nominally support adaptive sync don't have a very good implementation of it, but you can try it and see how it goes.  It probably won't be worse than leaving it off, and might be a lot better.

    The first hardware upgrade I'd look into for that computer is a bigger SSD--in addition to the old one, not as a replacement for it.  Hopefully HP installed the OS on your SSD, but 120 GB just isn't very much space for installing games, especially when Windows will want a lot of that.  Add a 500 GB SSD for $70 or so and you'll have plenty of space to store games and any other programs you use.  That won't often improve your frame rates, but it will make games load a lot faster.  An SSD uses very little power, so it doesn't bring the power and cooling issues that a video card upgrade would.
    I'll do that. Also turned on Adaptive Sync and while I was in the Nvidia control panal noticied that my monitor wasn't even set to 1080p. So I changed that too. Logged into MHW which I was only getting about 45 frames in. I am now getting 60. Don't know if those two things should have changed FPS or if it was something else but I am not complaining.

    Game is running on Ultra as well. So thanks @Quizzical and I will get back to you with the rest tomorrow
    In that case, I suspect that a bad video driver was at least a contributing factor to your problems.  There's a decent chance that HP shipped your computer with the oldest driver that supported your video card, and never updated it, even if you bought the computer a year later.  If you didn't update the driver yourself, then you had missed out on a lot of driver optimizations that would have increased performance.  A game as popular as Monster Hunter World is likely to get game-specific optimizations to eek out a little more performance, too.  If you already had the latest video driver, then I don't have a good explanation for what you observed.

    For what it's worth, from your original post, I half expected you to have some $600 fire hazard from Wal-Mart that would be basically impossible to upgrade.  That's not what you have; you bought something from HP more focused on gaming.  Still, when you get something from a big OEM like that, they'll make sure that their parts work with each other, but they might not be as compatible with other parts as you'd like.
    Hahaha no I made sure my computer was at least decent by doing some research and asking a few friends some questions. In the end I spent about $1500 at Best Buy. Which was about my limit
    Currently playing: Outer Worlds (Xbox One X)

    Currently Reading: Skaven Slayer (Gotrek and Felix Book 2)

    Currently Writing: Champions of Legend Book 1 (3rd Draft)

    Currently Watching: Oz (Season 4), Soprano's (Season 1)


  • CleffyCleffy Member RarePosts: 6,246
    In my opinion it would be a waste of money for you to upgrade your system right now. There are maybe 3 things you can upgrade, but the difference would be negligible and the price would be high. Save your money.
    Arterius
  • DragnelusDragnelus Member EpicPosts: 3,263
    Should wait till 14 feb and looks what specs and price gtx1660ti will have?
    Ozmodan

  • OzmodanOzmodan Member EpicPosts: 9,726
    t0nyd said:
    What resolution are you playing at? You're playing at 1080p then you're processor might be holding you back. If you're playing it 1440p your video card might be holding you back. What is your FPS Target? Are you going for 60 hertz or 144?
    An 8700?  I very much doubt the processor has anything to do with holding anything back.
  • ArteriusArterius Member EpicPosts: 2,832
    I play at 1080p thats what my monitor is built for 
    Currently playing: Outer Worlds (Xbox One X)

    Currently Reading: Skaven Slayer (Gotrek and Felix Book 2)

    Currently Writing: Champions of Legend Book 1 (3rd Draft)

    Currently Watching: Oz (Season 4), Soprano's (Season 1)


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