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Question for EQ1 players

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  • blueturtle13blueturtle13 Member LegendaryPosts: 11,880
    Great points Ridelynn and you nailed the real challenge these games face. The gaming landscape is not the same. Times have changed, gamers have changed and expectations have changed. 



    Pantheon is facing a real uphill battle to find success. I can understand EQ1 players salivating over the possibility to play EQ 2020 but the reality may be tougher than many realize. 
    The game could not even raise enough interest or money for it's funding. More than once.

    CU raised millions.
    Crowfall raised millions.
    Chronicles of Elyria raised millions.
    Ashes of Creation raised millions.

    Pantheon raised.....$460,000 of an $800k asking failed Kickstarter.

    I think how all this plays out will be interesting because I am curious about those who claim to want this kind of game and those who actually stay and pay for it long term.
    Plus they chose Unity. Unity for pete's sake! That shows how broke they really are. 
    Didn't Brad learn from Vanguard not to use an off the shelf engine? 

    As long as fans understand what they are getting they should be able to enjoy it. Yet threads that go on and on about Pantheon bring back.....whatever it is they want back, should pump the brakes a bit. Even the developers know this is a small game with limited appeal. It is a 20 year old game with new paint. That's it. 

    I hope enough people stick around long term to keep the fans of the project entertained. Because an mmorpg with no players is not one.
    craftseekerkitaradMendelRidelynnTorvalKyleran

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  • centkincentkin Member RarePosts: 1,481
    Well, if you go back far enough -- anything people sold could be bought back from the vendors.  I used to actually seed whole cities worth of vendors with junk so that I could buy what was behind the junk (it only showed 24 slots and there were 72 more behind it).  You wouldn't believe the number of say vellious crafting materials, spider silks, pelts of all sorts of qualities, and other special items people would sell to vendors.  It was a game in a game.
    craftseekerRidelynnKyleran
  • InteritusInteritus Member UncommonPosts: 236
    Despite the difficulty in EQ1, I also have the most memories from that game. When you accomplished something, you really earned it.  I have many fun memories from EQ1.

    That said, MMO's have changed. They will tell you an area to do your quest or outright highlight what you are supposed to kill. And yeah, I completely take advantage of that.  We've become used to things being easy.

    Some others touched on it, but I think it might be a hard sell for those who didn't experience old school EQ. And maybe even for those who did. 
  • svannsvann Member RarePosts: 2,202
    There was something about eq that just felt real.  In these newer games it feels more like you are just spinning your wheels.  There is something different.  I hope Pantheon can grab that essence.
    blueturtle13craftseekerdelete5230Amathe
  • DOLPHYNNDOLPHYNN Member UncommonPosts: 5
    EQ had a lot of smaller features and systems missing from modern MMOs.  Factions were interesting.  It had drunken walking.  It had elvish and other languages you would learn by listening to them.  It had weight limits making your movement crawl due to the amount of moolah you had on you.  Underwater combat was a blast.  The devs focused on what they could make (Illusion spell to be an item in the environment inevitably made people try to be the pile of poop in Qeynos).  Bards had like a billion abilities to choose from, but they could only choose 8 of them at a time and hope they had what was needed.  Trains kept you on your toes.  

    craftseekerdelete5230Amathe
  • blueturtle13blueturtle13 Member LegendaryPosts: 11,880
    svann said:
    There was something about eq that just felt real.  In these newer games it feels more like you are just spinning your wheels.  There is something different.  I hope Pantheon can grab that essence.
    What do you mean 'felt real'? I'm curious 

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  • craftseekercraftseeker Member RarePosts: 1,740
    svann said:
    There was something about eq that just felt real.  In these newer games it feels more like you are just spinning your wheels.  There is something different.  I hope Pantheon can grab that essence.
    What do you mean 'felt real'? I'm curious 
    Sorry but if you weren't there you will probably never know
    delete5230kitaradAmatheDemogorgon
  • delete5230delete5230 Member EpicPosts: 5,951
    svann said:
    There was something about eq that just felt real.  In these newer games it feels more like you are just spinning your wheels.  There is something different.  I hope Pantheon can grab that essence.
    What do you mean 'felt real'? I'm curious 
    What's with making everyone explain themselves ? 
    I barely even played the game and I understand. A living breathing world where you can make your own choices, build YOUR OWN character, get a group together and make your own adventure. 

    If you don't like it their are well 200 games that play the game for you.  Maybe you played so many of them you cant understand "felt real".  
  • immodiumimmodium Member RarePosts: 2,580
    svann said:
    There was something about eq that just felt real.  In these newer games it feels more like you are just spinning your wheels.  There is something different.  I hope Pantheon can grab that essence.
    What do you mean 'felt real'? I'm curious 
    Sorry but if you weren't there you will probably never know
    I was there and I'm curious by what you mean. It was definitely a new experience.

    IMO PvE over the years has dramatically improved and the NPC towns feel more 'alive'.
    blueturtle13Torval

    image
  • kitaradkitarad Member EpicPosts: 5,270
    immodium said:
    svann said:
    There was something about eq that just felt real.  In these newer games it feels more like you are just spinning your wheels.  There is something different.  I hope Pantheon can grab that essence.
    What do you mean 'felt real'? I'm curious 
    Sorry but if you weren't there you will probably never know
    I was there and I'm curious by what you mean. It was definitely a new experience.

    IMO PvE over the years has dramatically improved and the NPC towns feel more 'alive'.
    It distinctly had to do with it being my first mmorpg. 
    blueturtle13Kyleran

  • svannsvann Member RarePosts: 2,202
    edited September 2018
    svann said:
    There was something about eq that just felt real.  In these newer games it feels more like you are just spinning your wheels.  There is something different.  I hope Pantheon can grab that essence.
    What do you mean 'felt real'? I'm curious 
    You want me to define a feeling?  It felt real.  It felt like a world.  Zones didnt feel like rooms with fights in them, they felt like part of a world.
    AmatheDemogorgon
  • blueturtle13blueturtle13 Member LegendaryPosts: 11,880
    svann said:
    There was something about eq that just felt real.  In these newer games it feels more like you are just spinning your wheels.  There is something different.  I hope Pantheon can grab that essence.
    What do you mean 'felt real'? I'm curious 
    Sorry but if you weren't there you will probably never know
    I was there. It didn't feel real to me. That's why I asked ;)

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  • blueturtle13blueturtle13 Member LegendaryPosts: 11,880
    kitarad said:
    immodium said:
    svann said:
    There was something about eq that just felt real.  In these newer games it feels more like you are just spinning your wheels.  There is something different.  I hope Pantheon can grab that essence.
    What do you mean 'felt real'? I'm curious 
    Sorry but if you weren't there you will probably never know
    I was there and I'm curious by what you mean. It was definitely a new experience.

    IMO PvE over the years has dramatically improved and the NPC towns feel more 'alive'.
    It distinctly had to do with it being my first mmorpg. 
    See that is the real answer. It was your first. People will always look fondly on their first. Regardless. 

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  • blueturtle13blueturtle13 Member LegendaryPosts: 11,880
    svann said:
    There was something about eq that just felt real.  In these newer games it feels more like you are just spinning your wheels.  There is something different.  I hope Pantheon can grab that essence.
    What do you mean 'felt real'? I'm curious 
    What's with making everyone explain themselves ? 
    I barely even played the game and I understand. A living breathing world where you can make your own choices, build YOUR OWN character, get a group together and make your own adventure. 

    If you don't like it their are well 200 games that play the game for you.  Maybe you played so many of them you cant understand "felt real".  

    Why so hostile? I just asked a simple question. Actually I didn't even ask you that question. So not sure why you felt the need to respond. 
    What do YOU mean by a living breathing world? I have played mmorpgs since NWN AOL and I have never played any game that felt like living breathing world. What does that even mean?

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  • svannsvann Member RarePosts: 2,202
    kitarad said:
    immodium said:
    svann said:
    There was something about eq that just felt real.  In these newer games it feels more like you are just spinning your wheels.  There is something different.  I hope Pantheon can grab that essence.
    What do you mean 'felt real'? I'm curious 
    Sorry but if you weren't there you will probably never know
    I was there and I'm curious by what you mean. It was definitely a new experience.

    IMO PvE over the years has dramatically improved and the NPC towns feel more 'alive'.
    It distinctly had to do with it being my first mmorpg. 
    See that is the real answer. It was your first. People will always look fondly on their first. Regardless. 

    Actually, UO was my first.
    blueturtle13
  • blueturtle13blueturtle13 Member LegendaryPosts: 11,880
    svann said:
    kitarad said:
    immodium said:
    svann said:
    There was something about eq that just felt real.  In these newer games it feels more like you are just spinning your wheels.  There is something different.  I hope Pantheon can grab that essence.
    What do you mean 'felt real'? I'm curious 
    Sorry but if you weren't there you will probably never know
    I was there and I'm curious by what you mean. It was definitely a new experience.

    IMO PvE over the years has dramatically improved and the NPC towns feel more 'alive'.
    It distinctly had to do with it being my first mmorpg. 
    See that is the real answer. It was your first. People will always look fondly on their first. Regardless. 

    Actually, UO was my first.
    That's fine but I was talking to kitarad ;)

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  • AmatheAmathe Member LegendaryPosts: 6,174
    For me "feeling real" meant i was fully immersed. I wasn't just playing the ranger class. I was a ranger. The woods were woods. The orcs were orcs. Mysteries abounded and I was fascinated by whatever was around the next corner. In much the same way a flight simulator can make you feel like you are really flying, I felt like I was a fantasy character in a fantasy world.

    A fair amount of that was because it was my first mmorpg. That part can never be recaptured.

    But the game itself played a big role too. I can still listen to the in game music and it carries me back to my adventures then. 
    blueturtle13Ridelynndelete5230Kyleran

    EQ1, EQ2, SWG, SWTOR, GW, GW2 CoH, CoV, FFXI, WoW, CO, War,TSW and a slew of free trials and beta tests

  • blueturtle13blueturtle13 Member LegendaryPosts: 11,880
    Amathe said:
    For me "feeling real" meant i was fully immersed. I wasn't just playing the ranger class. I was a ranger. The woods were woods. The orcs were orcs. Mysteries abounded and I was fascinated by whatever was around the next corner. In much the same way a flight simulator can make you feel like you are really flying, I felt like I was a fantasy character in a fantasy world.

    A fair amount of that was because it was my first mmorpg. That part can never be recaptured.

    But the game itself played a big role too. I can still listen to the in game music and it carries me back to my adventures then. 
    Thanks for that. I have always been fascinated by what people like and dislike about games they once played and currently play.


    Gaming can be so personal and those experiences are so unique. 
    When we build a world in our projects here at work we always have that in the forefront of our mind. What will players respond to in a positive way? What will they in a negative way? 


    One thing I always admired about EQ was the sound. AC had hardly any sound. EQ definitely had great sound design. 

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  • TheocritusTheocritus Member EpicPosts: 7,098
    Dagimir said:
    This is ridiculous. How can you guys even form an opinion of everquest if you didn't play it in its heyday? The game had so many successful community building aspects to it that it promoted a healthy game environment in an mmo. It's success was how it forced people to interact in a positive manner to advance. In original everquest you could not solo. I cannot emphasize enough that the sheer difficulty of the game and not catering to the 'solo' player in an mmo is why it was a success.

    Examples of positive community aspects:

    Fast travel was only available through 2 classes. Druids and Wizards. Otherwise you would travel for what could literally be hours on foot with the chance of death and respawn at your bind point. This created taxi services and player interaction.

    Trade and barter was nearly face to face. There was no market mechanic at all. People would literally shout in chat channels to come view their wares where they would show you backpacks full of loot and you could haggle with them in prices.  The players themselves on many servers set up a trade tunnel in a neutral area so all races could come and barter.

    Fighting almost anything. If you were one of the weaker classes at the beginning of the game then a level 1 rat or a snake (that could kick) would kill your character. From the very start of the game to the end you were almost required to have a partner. This promoted the most heavily co-op and group centric mmorpg that I have ever experienced.

    These are just a few of the many examples of what everquest got right that every single other mmorpg has failed at. Yeah it's not always convenient to find a partner but that's why there are things like tradeskills, bartering, and god forbid roleplaying at the dark elf tavern with the elf and troll strippers. (Look it up)
    My opinion as a person that never played as hardcore as this,
    I'm very looking forward to it, but at the same time it's scary (this is making me sound like a snowflake).  Best way to explain it is like getting on a bad ass roller coaster.  Yet I'll make it work NO MATTER WHAT, just like insisting on getting on the roller coaster.  

    I think it was Amathe plans on playing slow and logging in to basking at the beautiful environment.  Maybe not them words, but it's something I would like to do. No rush I could be playing for years, and finding my crowed of people.  This I miss in my second generation games.  
    What was so 'hardcore' about Everquest? There were far more hardcore games at the time. Everquest was WOW back then. The mainstream mmorpg for a more casual mmorpg player, not the hardcore mmorpg player.
    That's cool people like it just as it is cool people like WOW after it, but EQ is NOT  nor ever was 'hardcore'  
    lol I think you're just trolling tio troll...EQ was hard...You died often...It was not easy to solo for most classes...You had to be very careful both traveling and when you were fighting not to get adds....To say it was WoW is ridiculous.
    svannblueturtle13delete5230Demogorgonmmolou
  • blueturtle13blueturtle13 Member LegendaryPosts: 11,880
    Dagimir said:
    This is ridiculous. How can you guys even form an opinion of everquest if you didn't play it in its heyday? The game had so many successful community building aspects to it that it promoted a healthy game environment in an mmo. It's success was how it forced people to interact in a positive manner to advance. In original everquest you could not solo. I cannot emphasize enough that the sheer difficulty of the game and not catering to the 'solo' player in an mmo is why it was a success.

    Examples of positive community aspects:

    Fast travel was only available through 2 classes. Druids and Wizards. Otherwise you would travel for what could literally be hours on foot with the chance of death and respawn at your bind point. This created taxi services and player interaction.

    Trade and barter was nearly face to face. There was no market mechanic at all. People would literally shout in chat channels to come view their wares where they would show you backpacks full of loot and you could haggle with them in prices.  The players themselves on many servers set up a trade tunnel in a neutral area so all races could come and barter.

    Fighting almost anything. If you were one of the weaker classes at the beginning of the game then a level 1 rat or a snake (that could kick) would kill your character. From the very start of the game to the end you were almost required to have a partner. This promoted the most heavily co-op and group centric mmorpg that I have ever experienced.

    These are just a few of the many examples of what everquest got right that every single other mmorpg has failed at. Yeah it's not always convenient to find a partner but that's why there are things like tradeskills, bartering, and god forbid roleplaying at the dark elf tavern with the elf and troll strippers. (Look it up)
    My opinion as a person that never played as hardcore as this,
    I'm very looking forward to it, but at the same time it's scary (this is making me sound like a snowflake).  Best way to explain it is like getting on a bad ass roller coaster.  Yet I'll make it work NO MATTER WHAT, just like insisting on getting on the roller coaster.  

    I think it was Amathe plans on playing slow and logging in to basking at the beautiful environment.  Maybe not them words, but it's something I would like to do. No rush I could be playing for years, and finding my crowed of people.  This I miss in my second generation games.  
    What was so 'hardcore' about Everquest? There were far more hardcore games at the time. Everquest was WOW back then. The mainstream mmorpg for a more casual mmorpg player, not the hardcore mmorpg player.
    That's cool people like it just as it is cool people like WOW after it, but EQ is NOT  nor ever was 'hardcore'  
    lol I think you're just trolling tio troll...EQ was hard...You died often...It was not easy to solo for most classes...You had to be very careful both traveling and when you were fighting not to get adds....To say it was WoW is ridiculous.
    Agree to disagree. Just because I don't agree with you does not mean I am trolling. It means I have a different point of view ;)

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  • blueturtle13blueturtle13 Member LegendaryPosts: 11,880
    edited September 2018
    Dagimir said:
    This is ridiculous. How can you guys even form an opinion of everquest if you didn't play it in its heyday? The game had so many successful community building aspects to it that it promoted a healthy game environment in an mmo. It's success was how it forced people to interact in a positive manner to advance. In original everquest you could not solo. I cannot emphasize enough that the sheer difficulty of the game and not catering to the 'solo' player in an mmo is why it was a success.

    Examples of positive community aspects:

    Fast travel was only available through 2 classes. Druids and Wizards. Otherwise you would travel for what could literally be hours on foot with the chance of death and respawn at your bind point. This created taxi services and player interaction.

    Trade and barter was nearly face to face. There was no market mechanic at all. People would literally shout in chat channels to come view their wares where they would show you backpacks full of loot and you could haggle with them in prices.  The players themselves on many servers set up a trade tunnel in a neutral area so all races could come and barter.

    Fighting almost anything. If you were one of the weaker classes at the beginning of the game then a level 1 rat or a snake (that could kick) would kill your character. From the very start of the game to the end you were almost required to have a partner. This promoted the most heavily co-op and group centric mmorpg that I have ever experienced.

    These are just a few of the many examples of what everquest got right that every single other mmorpg has failed at. Yeah it's not always convenient to find a partner but that's why there are things like tradeskills, bartering, and god forbid roleplaying at the dark elf tavern with the elf and troll strippers. (Look it up)
    My opinion as a person that never played as hardcore as this,
    I'm very looking forward to it, but at the same time it's scary (this is making me sound like a snowflake).  Best way to explain it is like getting on a bad ass roller coaster.  Yet I'll make it work NO MATTER WHAT, just like insisting on getting on the roller coaster.  

    I think it was Amathe plans on playing slow and logging in to basking at the beautiful environment.  Maybe not them words, but it's something I would like to do. No rush I could be playing for years, and finding my crowed of people.  This I miss in my second generation games.  
    What was so 'hardcore' about Everquest? There were far more hardcore games at the time. Everquest was WOW back then. The mainstream mmorpg for a more casual mmorpg player, not the hardcore mmorpg player.
    That's cool people like it just as it is cool people like WOW after it, but EQ is NOT  nor ever was 'hardcore'  
    lol I think you're just trolling tio troll...EQ was hard...You died often...It was not easy to solo for most classes...You had to be very careful both traveling and when you were fighting not to get adds....To say it was WoW is ridiculous.
    Also it was the WOW of its day. It was the mainstream mmorpg of it's day. At least in the West (FFXI had better numbers)
    Every mmorpg had what you just claimed. All of them. 
    In fact you should watch Nerdslayers video on the death of a franchise Everquest.
    He does a really great job explaining the connection to EQ and WOW 
    WOW was basically EQ 2. Blizz took what many liked about EQ and refined it. Creating a game that was more a continuation of EQ1 than EQ2 would be. 
    There is nothing wrong with calling it the WOW of it's day. ( in the west)
    In fact it is the highest compliment you can give the game ;)  
    Post edited by blueturtle13 on
    svannTorvalmmolou

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  • RhoklawRhoklaw Member EpicPosts: 6,606
    Since Pantheon was first announced, fans of EQ were claiming it as a spiritual successor to EQ, which EQ2 kind of failed to do. Some claim EQ was the WoW of it's era, but WoW and it's horribly simple game design weren't introduced for another 4-5 years. If any EQ game was like WoW, it would be EQ2.

    All games back then were a bit more hardcore versus games today. To say UO or AC were hard but EQ was not is just biased nonsense and coming from a certain few, it doesn't surprise me you continue down that path.

    We get it. Some of you love the new easy mode MMO's that focus more on youthful twitch combat and pretty graphics. Well, there are some of us who prefer story, content and choice.

    Pantheon is very much like EQ and while Brad did point out it's NOT EQ's spiritual successor, is simply because he wants Pantheon to have it's own identity, which it does.

    Today's MMOs focus solely on action combat and flashy graphics for entertainment. I'm not talking about WoW either obviously, nor SWTOR, ESO, FFXIV, GW2 or EQ2. All of those games use traditional combat and the trinity system, except of course GW2. They are all however heavily focused on dungeon raids, crafting and story content. The games I'm referring to are the Asian F2P MMOs who have time and time again published the exact same crap over the past 5 years. From ArcheAge, Black Desert Online, Blade and Soul, Revelation Online and Bless Online. To me, those games are more like fantasy FPS, then an actual adventure focused, story driven type games.

    It's obvious we have plenty of mainstream and recent MMOs to suit any millennial gamer's palette. Pantheon is suited more towards veteran gamers who played D&D or table top games. Players who know what role-playing is. Players who play just as much for the social and grouping aspects as the individual tasks like crafting or exploration.
    blueturtle13Gyva02Demogorgon

  • asteldiancaliskanasteldiancaliskan Member UncommonPosts: 58
    Lokero said:zee

    What was so 'hardcore' about Everquest? There were far more hardcore games at the time. Everquest was WOW back then. The mainstream mmorpg for a more casual mmorpg player, not the hardcore mmorpg player.
    That's cool people like it just as it is cool people like WOW after it, but EQ is NOT  nor ever was 'hardcore'  
    What was kind of cool about EQ's difficulty is that it was as hardcore as the players chose to make it, in a lot of ways.

    Yeah, the average group of players was probably playing as safe and WoW-level as they could, which was absolutely possible to do.  This is also why I hate harsh death penalties.  It makes people play it safe and casual(boring).

    On the other hand, the game offered you the ability to truly push and challenge yourself and do all sorts of crazy things.
    Sure, most people sat in one spot pulling one or two monsters at a time for hours on end.  And, that type of play truly was boring and as casual as you could get.
    With the right people(or often even by yourself) though, you could really go crazy and take on half the world and push your limits.

    The constantly challenging myself mentality is why I absolutely abhor level loss and major punishments for death.  I died so freaking much in EQ that it's not even funny.  I was always doing things I knew I shouldn't have been able to do on my own, etc.

    The people who want to take risks will take them regardless of punishments, and the more casual types will cower in a corner and miss all the excitement and fun of the game because they are afraid of the penalties.

    Ergo, the irony, that all severe punishment does is make the game more casual for the average player. 
    People like to espouse those brutal penalties as being conducive to creating some kind of tougher, more challenging environment in a game, but I've found the opposite to be true.  It simply makes people take the nice safe, well-tended road, rather than venture off the beaten path.
    Death penalty is always a divisive topic. For me it was why i liked taking risks - it brought a thrill to the gameplay. Doing crazy shit and thinking 'damn if we die we are screwed!' And the relief and satisfaction of surviving was a big deal.
    No death penalty means there are no risks to take - there cannot be a risk if failure has no consequence. Just go ahead and Leeroy Jenkins anything, if you fail it doesnt matter, if you succeed...well, cool, rinse and repeat. That makes the games bland for me - because ultimately i dont care about the outcome since worse case i dust myself off and try afain, best case i won...which doesnt really matter either since losing is not an issue.
    Neanderthal
  • blueturtle13blueturtle13 Member LegendaryPosts: 11,880
    edited September 2018
    Rhoklaw said:
    Since Pantheon was first announced, fans of EQ were claiming it as a spiritual successor to EQ, which EQ2 kind of failed to do. Some claim EQ was the WoW of it's era, but WoW and it's horribly simple game design weren't introduced for another 4-5 years. If any EQ game was like WoW, it would be EQ2.

    All games back then were a bit more hardcore versus games today. To say UO or AC were hard but EQ was not is just biased nonsense and coming from a certain few, it doesn't surprise me you continue down that path.

    We get it. Some of you love the new easy mode MMO's that focus more on youthful twitch combat and pretty graphics. Well, there are some of us who prefer story, content and choice.

    Pantheon is very much like EQ and while Brad did point out it's NOT EQ's spiritual successor, is simply because he wants Pantheon to have it's own identity, which it does.

    Today's MMOs focus solely on action combat and flashy graphics for entertainment. I'm not talking about WoW either obviously, nor SWTOR, ESO, FFXIV, GW2 or EQ2. All of those games use traditional combat and the trinity system, except of course GW2. They are all however heavily focused on dungeon raids, crafting and story content. The games I'm referring to are the Asian F2P MMOs who have time and time again published the exact same crap over the past 5 years. From ArcheAge, Black Desert Online, Blade and Soul, Revelation Online and Bless Online. To me, those games are more like fantasy FPS, then an actual adventure focused, story driven type games.

    It's obvious we have plenty of mainstream and recent MMOs to suit any millennial gamer's palette. Pantheon is suited more towards veteran gamers who played D&D or table top games. Players who know what role-playing is. Players who play just as much for the social and grouping aspects as the individual tasks like crafting or exploration.
    WOW at launch did not have horribly simple game design.
    why do you take it as an insult? It isn't 
    No one said EQ was not hard. 
    No one said anything at all about twitch combat but you. 
    What story do you think Pantheon will have? Like EQs? ;)

    What content are you talking about? Statically placed mobs standing around waiting to get murdered?
    All while running on a terrible Unity engine? I'm not sure once you actually get your hands on the game you will feel the same ;)


    Also, why the shade on 30+ year old gamers? What do people younger than you have to do with Pantheon?
    So if they are in their 30's they are not veteran gamers who do not know how to roleplay? Wow friend, kind of a douche thing to think and say. I hope you are not the target audience for a game like Pantheon if that is how you really think and feel. 


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  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 6,859
    Amathe said:
    For me "feeling real" meant i was fully immersed. I wasn't just playing the ranger class. I was a ranger. The woods were woods. The orcs were orcs. Mysteries abounded and I was fascinated by whatever was around the next corner. In much the same way a flight simulator can make you feel like you are really flying, I felt like I was a fantasy character in a fantasy world.

    A fair amount of that was because it was my first mmorpg. That part can never be recaptured.

    But the game itself played a big role too. I can still listen to the in game music and it carries me back to my adventures then. 
    I have to agree with this. WoW came very close a few times, but never quite got there.

    With EQ, the character and myself were interchangeable. The server was a community, and we all knew each other. There were entire families of people on there - both literally and figuratively, and I felt like I was a part of that.

    The game in and of itself was just there as a backdrop - we sat around on the hill in Overthere or down in yet another LDON run or wherever, and what we did became instinctual because we did it over and over again, but we didn't do it because the gameplay was fascinating, we did it because we were together.

    And that made the distinction between myself and my character blur considerably. I haven't played EQ in many years now, but I still will respond if someone says "gnome".
    blueturtle13Lokerodelete5230skadad
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