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New PC advice - Threadripper 1950x

ZethapetaZethapeta Member UncommonPosts: 28
Hello,

I am planning to buy a new PC. I am using it to work in 3D, rendering, etc... So it is not just for gaming. But I would like to Know if Threadripper would give good results for gaming as well.

- Threadripper 1950x. 16 cores
- MSI X399 SLI PLUS
- RAM 32Gb (4x8Gb). G. Skill Ripjaws DDR4 3000.
- Noctua NH-U9TR4-SP3
- Tacens Mars 750W silver.
- SSD 850 EVO 500Gb (I am reusing this one)
- HDD 4Tb. Seagate
- Nox Hummer ZN USB 3.0
- GTX 1080 Gigabute Windforce /  1080 TI
 
Do you think it is a good PC build? Any components that could be a better choice with the threadripper?

RAM is too expensive right now. I will upgrade to 64 GB when/if prices drop down. Can this be a problem?
Not sure if 1080TI is worthh the price difference.

Thanks!

Comments

  • VrikaVrika Member LegendaryPosts: 7,381
    edited December 2017
    Threadripper is not really designed for gaming, and Intel's $300 processor would give you equal gaming performance, but Threadripper is good enough and that configuration should run all games really well.

    If I were you I'd get a better power supply. 750W is good enough wattage is long as you aren't planning on using SLI, but for a computer as expensive as yours you should get something that's good quality and reliable. I'd recommend this one, it has 10 year warranty and gotten good reviews: 
       https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817438093&cm_re=supernova-_-17-438-093-_-Product


    I don't know enough about Threadrippers to give good advice on RAM.
    Cryolitycal
     
  • ZethapetaZethapeta Member UncommonPosts: 28
    There is no stock of that G3 EVGA
    But there is a similar Corsair with 10 years guarranty as well

    https://www.pccomponentes.com/corsair-rm750x-750w-80-plus-gold-modular-blanca


    Is it worth waiting till January to buy the PC, just in case Nvidia or AMD/intel anouince something new?

  • CopperfieldCopperfield Member RarePosts: 654
    no point in buying a 16 cores cpu like the dude already said above..

    i would go for the i7 8th generatoin 8700k  with a ssd .m2 


    Cryolitycal
  • ZethapetaZethapeta Member UncommonPosts: 28
    no point in buying a 16 cores cpu like the dude already said above..

    i would go for the i7 8th generatoin 8700k  with a ssd .m2 



    I already have a SSD, is it worth to upgrade to an m.2?
    I am also considering the 8700k, but the difference in perfomance while rendering is huge, not in gaming.

    Ozmodan
  • VrikaVrika Member LegendaryPosts: 7,381
    Zethapeta said:
    There is no stock of that G3 EVGA
    But there is a similar Corsair with 10 years guarranty as well

    https://www.pccomponentes.com/corsair-rm750x-750w-80-plus-gold-modular-blanca


    Is it worth waiting till January to buy the PC, just in case Nvidia or AMD/intel anouince something new?

    That PSU looks good as well.

    You might want to wait until January 7th for NVidia's CES 2018 presentation. They released Titan V based on Volta architecture this December, and if we're lucky they could announce details of GTX 2080 also based on that same architecture any day now.

    For processors there's not anything worth waiting for.
     
  • VrikaVrika Member LegendaryPosts: 7,381
    no point in buying a 16 cores cpu like the dude already said above..

    i would go for the i7 8th generatoin 8700k  with a ssd .m2 
    Just to clarify, I did not say there's no point in buying 16 cores. There's no advantage for gaming, but there's gigantic advantage for rendering speed.
    OzmodanQuizzicalCryolitycal
     
  • ZethapetaZethapeta Member UncommonPosts: 28
    Any suggested box for the PC?
    I put a random one with good reviews
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 24,444
    You're pretty much the perfect candidate for a Threadripper CPU.  Traditionally, you could get fewer cores clocked higher (good for gaming, bad for rendering) or more cores clocked lower (good for rendering, bad for gaming).  Some engineers at AMD said, how about more cores clocked higher so that you can be good for both?  And thus Threadripper was born.

    It caught Intel off guard, and they scrambled to see how high they could clock a die that had been intended to be only for Xeon server CPUs in order to counter with Sky Lake-X.  For that matter, it caught AMD off guard, too, as it wasn't a planned product until some engineers said, look what we can do by mixing the stuff that we had intended for Ryzen and Epyc.

    Here's your power supply:

    https://www.pccomponentes.com/seasonic-focus-750w-80-plus-gold-modular

    EVGA and Corsair have both been caught doing some dodgy things with their power supplies, so while they sell a lot of good units, you don't necessarily know for certain what you're getting.  Seasonic actually samples their power supply units for reviews by having a major e-tailer pick a random unit from stock and ship it to the reviewer, so you know that you're seeing a review of the same unit you can buy yourself.

    There's nothing terribly important coming soon in either CPUs or GPUs unless you're in to integrated graphics--which you aren't.  The next generation of GPUs is waiting on GDDR6 memory, which is supposed to ramp up production over the course of the first half of next year.  It's plausible that Nvidia will launch a consumer Volta card in a few months, but if they do, it will be a paper launch like the GeForce GTX 1080 had and several months before you can find the cards at MSRP because there isn't enough memory for them.
    wanderica
  • CalaruilCalaruil Member UncommonPosts: 141
    I Would buy a threadripper if I could afford one, for my needs and I believe yours too it sounds ideal
  • OzmodanOzmodan Member EpicPosts: 9,726
    no point in buying a 16 cores cpu like the dude already said above..

    i would go for the i7 8th generatoin 8700k  with a ssd .m2 


    Did you even bother to read his initial post?  Granted the 8700 might be a bit faster at gaming, but the threadripper owns the 8700 when it comes to rendering.  Even Intel's $2000 cpus would be pushed to do better.

  • CleffyCleffy Member RarePosts: 6,390
    Avoid the Tacens psu. A lower watt more reliable psu is preferable over a cheap high watt psu.
    Without a dedicated rendering machine, threadripper is the best pick.
    Ridelynn
  • wandericawanderica Member UncommonPosts: 370
    edited December 2017
    Pretty much what Quizzical said.  I'm sure you know, but just to state it anyway, Threadripper is more of a prosumer product.  It is indeed a great choice for someone doing heavy rendering work and also wants to game on the side a bit.  The only time you're likely to notice the difference is in non GPU limited scenarios.  Since you're into 3D work, I'm assuming you have a high end monitor at least 1440p, or a highly color accurate monitor that may not be as fast anyway.

    In other words, it will game just fine, and if more games begin to scale heavily past 8 threads in the future, then you're way ahead of the game already.  Get it.  I'm sure you won't be disappointed. 

    Zethapeta said:
    Any suggested box for the PC?
    I put a random one with good reviews
    As for the case, my favorite case I've ever built in is the Phanteks Enthoo Pro: https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811854003&cm_re=phanteks_enthoo_pro-_-11-854-003-_-Product

    It's simple without all that excessive RGB that people seem to love these days, and it is a high quality case.  It IS a tad expensive though.  Thankfully, the case is one area you can skimp on a bit if you like.  Just look for one with extra fan attachments and front USB 3.0 and audio, and you should be good to go.  Some of my favorite case manufacturers: Lian Li, Corsair, Antec, and Phanteks.
    Post edited by wanderica on


  • CleffyCleffy Member RarePosts: 6,390
    My favorite case maker right now is InWin. I am eyeing the 101c right now. However, these cases are not the easiest to work with.
  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,341
    edited December 2017
    I've always been a Lian Li fan - very high quality but they are pricey though. All aluminum means they are lightweight, strong, and easy to mod. They usually have pretty clean designs, a large variety of designs, and without a lot of frills such as RGB. 

    My last build I tried a Corsair. It was a nice case to look at, and had a lot of little extras like rubber guards around the cable management ports. But it also had some boneheaded design moves, like needing to disassemble half the case to clean the fan filters, and a lot of plastic bits and plastic snap-together tabs that I am afraid won't hold up well over time. It looks slick though, white case with all white LEDs inside. I ended up repurposing it to another lighter duty rig and rebuilding my computer with another Lian Li.
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