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Intel Coffee Lake 6-core (Out Now)

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  • AmazingAveryAmazingAvery Age of Conan AdvocateMember UncommonPosts: 7,042
    edited October 2017
    Ridelynn said:
     But I still don't see a strong value case to upgrade a gaming rig from anything Sandy Bridge or later just yet.
    Guess it really depends on what you do; I thought this was interesting - 

    Intel i7-8700K vs i7-2600K - FINALLY Time to Upgrade Sandy Bridge?




    Post edited by AmazingAvery on
    Ridelynn



  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 6,183
    The biggest reason to upgrade - better RGB lighting controls.
    Torval
  • OzmodanOzmodan Member RarePosts: 8,804
    The problem with the z370 is the motherboard prices.   Where you can get a decent z270 for around $150, the z370's go for around $450.  Add in the higher CPU costs and it really bumps up the system cost.  Unless you have no money restraints, the z270 is a much better bargain, and the same goes for Ryzen.
    AmazingAveryGdemami
  • AmazingAveryAmazingAvery Age of Conan AdvocateMember UncommonPosts: 7,042
    Ozmodan said:
    The problem with the z370 is the motherboard prices.   Where you can get a decent z270 for around $150, the z370's go for around $450.  Add in the higher CPU costs and it really bumps up the system cost.  Unless you have no money restraints, the z270 is a much better bargain, and the same goes for Ryzen.
    Not sure where you are seeing $450 unless you are talking "Premium". You can get decent z370 for $150 too :)

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=-1&IsNodeId=1&Description=z370&bop=And&PageSize=96&order=PRICE

    Sorry but differences in system cost build is marginal

    https://www.gamersnexus.net/hwreviews/3076-intel-i7-8700k-review-vs-ryzen-streaming-gaming-overclocking

    http://cpu.userbenchmark.com/Compare/Intel-Core-i7-8700K-vs-AMD-Ryzen-7-1700X/3937vs3915




  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 6,183
    Yeah 370 prices will stabilize as it becomes more common.

    The bigger issue is just that you need 370 at all.
    TorvalQuizzical
  • OzmodanOzmodan Member RarePosts: 8,804
    Ozmodan said:
    The problem with the z370 is the motherboard prices.   Where you can get a decent z270 for around $150, the z370's go for around $450.  Add in the higher CPU costs and it really bumps up the system cost.  Unless you have no money restraints, the z270 is a much better bargain, and the same goes for Ryzen.
    Not sure where you are seeing $450 unless you are talking "Premium". You can get decent z370 for $150 too :)

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=-1&IsNodeId=1&Description=z370&bop=And&PageSize=96&order=PRICE

    Sorry but differences in system cost build is marginal

    https://www.gamersnexus.net/hwreviews/3076-intel-i7-8700k-review-vs-ryzen-streaming-gaming-overclocking

    http://cpu.userbenchmark.com/Compare/Intel-Core-i7-8700K-vs-AMD-Ryzen-7-1700X/3937vs3915


    So you show low end boards for the z370 and then try to compare them with z270 with much better features?  ROFL!
    AmazingAveryGdemami
  • TorvalTorval Member LegendaryPosts: 15,812
    Ridelynn said:
    Yeah 370 prices will stabilize as it becomes more common.

    The bigger issue is just that you need 370 at all.
    It's just one more hardware version compatibility check that needs to be made. At least it's not a subtle poorly documented one, but it's an unnecessary barrier. It should have been, if you want the features of the 370 that aren't in the 270 then that would be the right choice. Not "just because" and for no other reason than that.
    RidelynnAmazingAveryAsm0deus
  • AmazingAveryAmazingAvery Age of Conan AdvocateMember UncommonPosts: 7,042
    Ozmodan said:
    Ozmodan said:
    The problem with the z370 is the motherboard prices.   Where you can get a decent z270 for around $150, the z370's go for around $450.  Add in the higher CPU costs and it really bumps up the system cost.  Unless you have no money restraints, the z270 is a much better bargain, and the same goes for Ryzen.
    Not sure where you are seeing $450 unless you are talking "Premium". You can get decent z370 for $150 too :)

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=-1&IsNodeId=1&Description=z370&bop=And&PageSize=96&order=PRICE

    Sorry but differences in system cost build is marginal

    https://www.gamersnexus.net/hwreviews/3076-intel-i7-8700k-review-vs-ryzen-streaming-gaming-overclocking

    http://cpu.userbenchmark.com/Compare/Intel-Core-i7-8700K-vs-AMD-Ryzen-7-1700X/3937vs3915


    So you show low end boards for the z370 and then try to compare them with z270 with much better features?  ROFL!
    Not really mate, you came in spouting $450 FUD. They do not go for $450...

    For example MSI's mid range AM4 and z370 are priced more or less the same. In the links above if you read it, it says there is minimal build cost differences.

    Here something for you to look at, there is just 1 in that list that is +$450 lol -  Analyzing z370 for Intel's 8th generation Coffee Lake: A quick look at 50+ motherboards



  • AmazingAveryAmazingAvery Age of Conan AdvocateMember UncommonPosts: 7,042
    http://www.pcgamer.com/intel-i5-8400-review-the-best-new-gaming-cpu-in-years/

    Core i5-8400 gaming performance



    Core i5-8400 application performance



    ----------------------------------------------------------

    Core i7-8700K gaming performance


    Core i7-8700K application performance



  • Jean-Luc_PicardJean-Luc_Picard Member EpicPosts: 6,853
    edited February 20
    My 8700k overclocks to 4.7hgz on all cores without even trying, by just flipping a switch in my bios. No overheating, no instability. I definitely could go higher but I've always been a conservative overclocker, I'm fine with that. 12 logical cores at 4.7ghz, good enough for me. I've been compiling stuff for work today and the time gain is tremendous compared to the previous same level K generations. Rendering scenes with Maya or Blender got a major boost too.

    That processor is a beast. And even on a single core, the gain compared to the previous 7700k and 6700k is definitely noticeable. Gaming wise, it's interesting to see that games like ESO are making use of all 12 cores, even though a few are more favored than others. We have definitely entered a new era, finally.
    Post edited by Jean-Luc_Picard on
    laseritcheyane
    "The ability to speak doesn't make you intelligent" - Qui-gon Jinn in Star Wars.
    After many years of reading Internet forums, there's no doubt that nor does the ability to write.
    CPU: Core I7 8700k (4.70ghz) - GPU: Gigabyte GTX 980 Ti G1 Gaming - RAM: 16GB Kingston HyperX Savage DDR4 3000 - Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z370 Aorus Ultra Gaming - PSU: Antec TruePower New 750W - Storage: Kingston KC1000 NVMe 960gb SSD and 2x1TB WD Velociraptor HDDs (Raid 0) - Main display: Philips 40PUK6809 4K 3D TV - Second display: Philips 273v 27" gaming monitor - VR: Pimax 4K headset and Razer Hydra controllers - Soundcard: Sony STR-DH550 AV Receiver HDMI linked with the GPU and the TV, with Jamo S 426 HS 3 5.0 speakers and Pioneer S-21W subwoofer - OS: Windows 10 Pro 64 bits.

  • Jean-Luc_PicardJean-Luc_Picard Member EpicPosts: 6,853
    The Ryzen where supposed to be the kings of 3D rendering... well, I feel sorry for that 1800x:


    "The ability to speak doesn't make you intelligent" - Qui-gon Jinn in Star Wars.
    After many years of reading Internet forums, there's no doubt that nor does the ability to write.
    CPU: Core I7 8700k (4.70ghz) - GPU: Gigabyte GTX 980 Ti G1 Gaming - RAM: 16GB Kingston HyperX Savage DDR4 3000 - Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z370 Aorus Ultra Gaming - PSU: Antec TruePower New 750W - Storage: Kingston KC1000 NVMe 960gb SSD and 2x1TB WD Velociraptor HDDs (Raid 0) - Main display: Philips 40PUK6809 4K 3D TV - Second display: Philips 273v 27" gaming monitor - VR: Pimax 4K headset and Razer Hydra controllers - Soundcard: Sony STR-DH550 AV Receiver HDMI linked with the GPU and the TV, with Jamo S 426 HS 3 5.0 speakers and Pioneer S-21W subwoofer - OS: Windows 10 Pro 64 bits.

  • TorvalTorval Member LegendaryPosts: 15,812
    Surprised that 20 core Xeon scored so highly. :lol:
  • VrikaVrika Member EpicPosts: 4,437
    The Ryzen where supposed to be the kings of 3D rendering... well, I feel sorry for that 1800x:


    If you compare your overclocked processor against other processors running at stock speeds, then pick a test where your processor does as well as possible, it's a good way to boost your own ego.
    Gdemami
     
  • Jean-Luc_PicardJean-Luc_Picard Member EpicPosts: 6,853
    edited February 21
    Torval said:
    Surprised that 20 core Xeon scored so highly. :lol:
    Possibly an old version of the bench. It's 20 cores with HT, sounds strange.

    Vrika said:
    The Ryzen where supposed to be the kings of 3D rendering... well, I feel sorry for that 1800x:


    If you compare your overclocked processor against other processors running at stock speeds, then pick a test where your processor does as well as possible, it's a good way to boost your own ego.
    More like Intel's Ego, maybe? Lemme guess... Ryzen owner? Do I need to point out that the non boosted 8700k also beats all the other processors?

    It's not an overclock btw, it's one parameter in the Z370 bios, "optimize muti core performance". It simply puts all cores at the maximum official turbo speed. And as said, it only gives it an edge on the non optimized 8700k, which still beats the crap out the competition at stock speed.

    My ego is ok, but my customer satisfaction is definitely boosted. This is a top chipset with a top processor. My best upgrade since my 4790k.
    Post edited by Jean-Luc_Picard on
    Gdemami
    "The ability to speak doesn't make you intelligent" - Qui-gon Jinn in Star Wars.
    After many years of reading Internet forums, there's no doubt that nor does the ability to write.
    CPU: Core I7 8700k (4.70ghz) - GPU: Gigabyte GTX 980 Ti G1 Gaming - RAM: 16GB Kingston HyperX Savage DDR4 3000 - Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z370 Aorus Ultra Gaming - PSU: Antec TruePower New 750W - Storage: Kingston KC1000 NVMe 960gb SSD and 2x1TB WD Velociraptor HDDs (Raid 0) - Main display: Philips 40PUK6809 4K 3D TV - Second display: Philips 273v 27" gaming monitor - VR: Pimax 4K headset and Razer Hydra controllers - Soundcard: Sony STR-DH550 AV Receiver HDMI linked with the GPU and the TV, with Jamo S 426 HS 3 5.0 speakers and Pioneer S-21W subwoofer - OS: Windows 10 Pro 64 bits.

  • OzmodanOzmodan Member RarePosts: 8,804
    Torval said:
    Surprised that 20 core Xeon scored so highly. :lol:
    Possibly an old version of the bench. It's 20 cores with HT, sounds strange.

    Vrika said:
    The Ryzen where supposed to be the kings of 3D rendering... well, I feel sorry for that 1800x:


    If you compare your overclocked processor against other processors running at stock speeds, then pick a test where your processor does as well as possible, it's a good way to boost your own ego.
    More like Intel's Ego, maybe? Lemme guess... Ryzen owner? Do I need to point out that the non boosted 8700k also beats all the other processors?

    It's not an overclock btw, it's one parameter in the Z370 bios, "optimize muti core performance". It simply puts all cores at the maximum official turbo speed. And as said, it only gives it an edge on the non optimized 8700k, which still beats the crap out the competition at stock speed.

    My ego is ok, but my customer satisfaction is definitely boosted. This is a top chipset with a top processor. My best upgrade since my 4790k.
    Give me an AMD Ryzen any day of the week!
  • Jean-Luc_PicardJean-Luc_Picard Member EpicPosts: 6,853
    edited February 21
    Ozmodan said:
    Torval said:
    Surprised that 20 core Xeon scored so highly. :lol:
    Possibly an old version of the bench. It's 20 cores with HT, sounds strange.

    Vrika said:
    The Ryzen where supposed to be the kings of 3D rendering... well, I feel sorry for that 1800x:


    If you compare your overclocked processor against other processors running at stock speeds, then pick a test where your processor does as well as possible, it's a good way to boost your own ego.
    More like Intel's Ego, maybe? Lemme guess... Ryzen owner? Do I need to point out that the non boosted 8700k also beats all the other processors?

    It's not an overclock btw, it's one parameter in the Z370 bios, "optimize muti core performance". It simply puts all cores at the maximum official turbo speed. And as said, it only gives it an edge on the non optimized 8700k, which still beats the crap out the competition at stock speed.

    My ego is ok, but my customer satisfaction is definitely boosted. This is a top chipset with a top processor. My best upgrade since my 4790k.
    Give me an AMD Ryzen any day of the week!
    If it's only a money problem, and not a performance problem, then I agree. There's none of the current Ryzen line that can compete with the top Intel processors. Sadly. Even thought they have more cores, both physical and logical, they underperform.

    I don't pay for processor upgrades, so I'm definitely biased on that part (price). But performance wise, there's still no doubt at all. Intel is the way to go for top notch.
    Post edited by Jean-Luc_Picard on
    AmazingAvery
    "The ability to speak doesn't make you intelligent" - Qui-gon Jinn in Star Wars.
    After many years of reading Internet forums, there's no doubt that nor does the ability to write.
    CPU: Core I7 8700k (4.70ghz) - GPU: Gigabyte GTX 980 Ti G1 Gaming - RAM: 16GB Kingston HyperX Savage DDR4 3000 - Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z370 Aorus Ultra Gaming - PSU: Antec TruePower New 750W - Storage: Kingston KC1000 NVMe 960gb SSD and 2x1TB WD Velociraptor HDDs (Raid 0) - Main display: Philips 40PUK6809 4K 3D TV - Second display: Philips 273v 27" gaming monitor - VR: Pimax 4K headset and Razer Hydra controllers - Soundcard: Sony STR-DH550 AV Receiver HDMI linked with the GPU and the TV, with Jamo S 426 HS 3 5.0 speakers and Pioneer S-21W subwoofer - OS: Windows 10 Pro 64 bits.

  • VrikaVrika Member EpicPosts: 4,437
    It's not an overclock btw, it's one parameter in the Z370 bios, "optimize muti core performance". It simply puts all cores at the maximum official turbo speed. 
    You're right, my mistake. It's not an overclock, you merely compared your processor's boost clock to alternative processor's base clock in a synthetic test that suits your processor particularly well.


    In actual rendering performance Ryzen would have been about even with your processor:



    Source: https://www.pcworld.com/article/3230369/components-processors/core-i7-8700k-review-prices-specs-benchmarks.html
     
  • Jean-Luc_PicardJean-Luc_Picard Member EpicPosts: 6,853
    edited February 22
    Vrika said:
    It's not an overclock btw, it's one parameter in the Z370 bios, "optimize muti core performance". It simply puts all cores at the maximum official turbo speed. 
    You're right, my mistake. It's not an overclock, you merely compared your processor's boost clock to alternative processor's base clock in a synthetic test that suits your processor particularly well.


    In actual rendering performance Ryzen would have been about even with your processor:



    Source: https://www.pcworld.com/article/3230369/components-processors/core-i7-8700k-review-prices-specs-benchmarks.html
    Color me impressed, Ryzen is definitely not bad in those specific cases indeed. The problems the platform had at release have obviously been fixed.

    The same article also says that the 8700k has the best single threaded performance, still making it the best processor for gaming. Their 3DMark result on the second page is bullshit, since they only display the CPU multithreaded score which is not a gaming test, what they should have posted is the total score. All the other tests comfirm the Intel lead.
    You can see that even older Intel processor with the same number of cores than those Ryzen are beating them in that Blender test (279 for the 8/16 6900k vs 300 for the 8/16 1800x). So as I said, if one wants to notch performance and money isn't a problem, Intel is still the way to go.

    I'll make those tests myself on my platform when I'm back home to compare.

    It's nice to have AMD back to something competitive after so many years of being far behind Intel. It can only be good for us end consumers.
    Thanks for that link.
    Post edited by Jean-Luc_Picard on
    Ridelynn
    "The ability to speak doesn't make you intelligent" - Qui-gon Jinn in Star Wars.
    After many years of reading Internet forums, there's no doubt that nor does the ability to write.
    CPU: Core I7 8700k (4.70ghz) - GPU: Gigabyte GTX 980 Ti G1 Gaming - RAM: 16GB Kingston HyperX Savage DDR4 3000 - Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z370 Aorus Ultra Gaming - PSU: Antec TruePower New 750W - Storage: Kingston KC1000 NVMe 960gb SSD and 2x1TB WD Velociraptor HDDs (Raid 0) - Main display: Philips 40PUK6809 4K 3D TV - Second display: Philips 273v 27" gaming monitor - VR: Pimax 4K headset and Razer Hydra controllers - Soundcard: Sony STR-DH550 AV Receiver HDMI linked with the GPU and the TV, with Jamo S 426 HS 3 5.0 speakers and Pioneer S-21W subwoofer - OS: Windows 10 Pro 64 bits.

  • VrikaVrika Member EpicPosts: 4,437
    Jean-Luc_Picard said:

    So as I said, if one wants to notch performance and money isn't a problem, Intel is still the way to go.
    Yes, Intel is still the best.

    Before 8xxx processors were released, for a short while Ryzen offered much better price/performance ratio in situations that scale well to multiple threads. But with Intel increasing their number of cores from 4 to 6, they're now about even at that and Intel offers better single thread performance.

    AMD's threadripper processors offer still better price/performance than Intel once you need more than 8 cores and 16 threads, but those situations are rare, and for all other situations Intel is either equal or better.
    Ridelynn
     
  • CleffyCleffy Member RarePosts: 5,728
    One thing to keep in mind right now is that Intel's meltdown and spectre fixes aren't fully out yet. The first round of fixes caused a number of issues which required a rollback. Any fix is expected to have an impact in performance on Intel more so than AMD. But the 8700K is definitely a step in the right direction for Intel. For my last build I was pretty much stuck looking at AMD due to it performing as good as processors twice to three times as expensive in my typical workload.
    There are still problems with early Ryzen processors since the issue was with the actual fabrication which was solved in subsequent batches. Things like the limit on memory speed is more due to having an early Ryzen processor than the micro-code.
  • kjempffkjempff Member RarePosts: 1,349
    I did research a week ago to buy a pc for a friend. All benchmarks/reviews showed the i5-8400 coffee lake as punching way above its price tag (don't get fooled by clock speeds, it is not a good indicator of performance these days). In most gaming situations the i5-8400 coffee lake is just as good as the pricier i5-8600K. The lack of hyperthreading will have an effect in special cases, but considering the step up means almost double the price.. Other downside is that coffee lake require a new chipset and there are no budget mainboards out yet.
    In a few months or half a year I am sure some newer coffe lake or K version will beat the 8400, but right now it is best value for a mid range cpu, and to take a real step up you would need to go to a i7 8700K which is considerably more expensive.
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