Quantcast

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

ASUS ROG Claymore Core – A Premium TKL With Tricks All Its Own - MMORPG.com

SBFordSBFord Former Associate EditorMember LegendaryPosts: 33,126

imageASUS ROG Claymore Core – A Premium TKL With Tricks All Its Own - MMORPG.com

ASUS has a well-earned reputation. In the world of PC gaming peripherals, the Republic of Gamers started as a product line and expanded into a full on community of enthusiasts. Last week, we were sent two of ASUS' premiere products in ROG line. Today, we're looking at the company's flagship mechanical keyboard, the ROG Claymore Core. In an already crowded marketplace, does it have what it takes to stand out from the crowd?

Read the full story here



¯\_(ツ)_/¯ 


Comments

  • Asm0deusAsm0deus Member EpicPosts: 3,271
    It's pretty fugly.

    Brenics ~ Just to point out I do believe Chris Roberts is going down as the man who cheated backers and took down crowdfunding for gaming.





  • ExcessionExcession Member RarePosts: 709
    $160 and they could not afford to include numpad keys.
    bartoni33TheScavengerMaxBacon

    A creative person is motivated by the desire to achieve, not the desire to beat others.

  • Panther2103Panther2103 Member EpicPosts: 5,577

    Excession said:

    $160 and they could not afford to include numpad keys.



    I think it has more to do with a lot of keyboard users wanting a small form factor keyboard. I always get ones with a numpad but I have friends who refuse because of the size of their desks.
    Asm0deusbartoni33
  • TheelyTheely Member UncommonPosts: 430




    Excession said:


    $160 and they could not afford to include numpad keys.






    I think it has more to do with a lot of keyboard users wanting a small form factor keyboard. I always get ones with a numpad but I have friends who refuse because of the size of their desks.



    If you can spend 160$ on a lighty keyboard you could likely afford a larger desk!
    NightHaveNbartoni33SBFordXophSignex
  • Panther2103Panther2103 Member EpicPosts: 5,577
    Theely said:




    Excession said:


    $160 and they could not afford to include numpad keys.






    I think it has more to do with a lot of keyboard users wanting a small form factor keyboard. I always get ones with a numpad but I have friends who refuse because of the size of their desks.



    If you can spend 160$ on a lighty keyboard you could likely afford a larger desk!
    Oh I'm sure you could. I'm just saying in general some people like small desks / PC setups. Just like people like minimalist UI's in games.
    bartoni33Signex
  • TorvalTorval Member LegendaryPosts: 20,172
    TKLs are mostly for coders imo. The majority of programming doesn't use ten key. There are reasons to not include that in the form factor.

    There are also 61-key compact keyboard decks because a lot of programmers don't like the arrow or meta keys off to the side. Rather that functionality is programmed into the board if it's even needed because advanced the text editors typically used in those scenarios have all that built in (or allow for scripting/macros).

    You can see and learn a lot about specialty keyboards here: http://www.wasdkeyboards.com/index.php/ or other custom keyboard reseller sites. That is one of the best to start learning options, what's out there, and for comparisons.

    The $160 price tag isn't too bad compared to its more niche peers, but I think there are better options out there. If you look at some niche custom sites that style of keyboard can easily run $200 - $250.

    For a medium form factor keyboard I would choose the Cooler Master Pro M RGB or the Pro M White. They are short form factor but have the 10-key integrated with the arrow keys. This is still common functionality on a lot of 104 keyboards as well.

    You can see the RGB here: http://www.coolermaster.com/peripheral/keyboards/masterkeys-pro-m-rgb/. It's only $140 on NewEgg.

    If you don't need RGB colors and white will do you can find it here on Amazon for $65 (on sale normally $99).

    I still prefer Kingston HyperX but Cooler Master finally has fleshed out their offerings and they provide a wider range of decent keyboards of almost any style.

    Another thing to consider when buying these sorts of peripherals is the support software and onboard memory profiles. Do you need third party software? Is it provided? Is it any good? Does it play well with others? And most importantly do you have onboard memory profiles for when that software isn't running. I learned that lesson from a cheap Logitech G610.
    SBFordWraithone
    Fedora - A modern, free, and open source Operating System. https://getfedora.org/

    traveller, interloper, anomaly, iteration


  • StizzledStizzled Member RarePosts: 1,985

    Torval said:

    TKLs are mostly for coders imo. The majority of programming doesn't use ten key. There are reasons to not include that in the form factor.

    There are also 61-key compact keyboard decks because a lot of programmers don't like the arrow or meta keys off to the side. Rather that functionality is programmed into the board if it's even needed because advanced the text editors typically used in those scenarios have all that built in (or allow for scripting/macros).

    You can see and learn a lot about specialty keyboards here: http://www.wasdkeyboards.com/index.php/ or other custom keyboard reseller sites. That is one of the best to start learning options, what's out there, and for comparisons.

    The $160 price tag isn't too bad compared to its more niche peers, but I think there are better options out there. If you look at some niche custom sites that style of keyboard can easily run $200 - $250.

    For a medium form factor keyboard I would choose the Cooler Master Pro M RGB or the Pro M White. They are short form factor but have the 10-key integrated with the arrow keys. This is still common functionality on a lot of 104 keyboards as well.

    You can see the RGB here: http://www.coolermaster.com/peripheral/keyboards/masterkeys-pro-m-rgb/. It's only $140 on NewEgg.

    If you don't need RGB colors and white will do you can find it here on Amazon for $65 (on sale normally $99).

    I still prefer Kingston HyperX but Cooler Master finally has fleshed out their offerings and they provide a wider range of decent keyboards of almost any style.

    Another thing to consider when buying these sorts of peripherals is the support software and onboard memory profiles. Do you need third party software? Is it provided? Is it any good? Does it play well with others? And most importantly do you have onboard memory profiles for when that software isn't running. I learned that lesson from a cheap Logitech G610.



    I really wish I could get something like either of the boards you linked in a wireless edition.
    Torval
  • WizardryWizardry Member LegendaryPosts: 17,995
    edited July 2017
    Well i happen to have just bought an ASus ROG laptop.
    Here is the problem i faced and will likely get worse before better.

    If these product developers are so keen on bragging about their products,let me see it in the WARRANTY.

    You know what we get?1 year and that is ONLY because it is law,otherwise we would likely see no warranty,maybe 90 days or something.That warranty also involves we the consumer to cover the costs of shipping etc etc.So then we get a giant like Best Buy asking us to pay EXTRA to guarantee the product works and is not a lemon...say WTF?

    I laid into the salesmen,letting him know that i 100% fully expect my purchase to work WITHOUT any added costs.

    Point being that Asus is lumped right in with the rest.let's see them put their wallet behind their products ,let's see 2-3 year warranty.

    Never forget 3 mile Island and never trust a government official or company spokesman.

Sign In or Register to comment.