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How Design can Help Build Meaningful Relationships within Games

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  • VardahothVardahoth Member RarePosts: 1,472
    iixviiiix said:
    Vardahoth said:
    iixviiiix said:
    Vardahoth said:
    Allowing players to govern themselves, provide hard to acquire stuff that is rewarding and only can be done by working with people, and offer long progression grinds so the people will create their own friends/schedules/times to group up with whom they choose.
    I don't understand why most people like "make it hard so player have to work with other for reward" instead of "let share it and enjoy it together" .
    Why not both? Reward is just an incentive for "How Design can Help Build Meaningful Relationships within Games". I'm still friends with people who I played ragnarok online and lineage 2 with. I can't say I have a single friend that has lasted for every game that has come after that. So 2004 was the cut off for me.

    Also, millennials don't understand deep meaningful (unconditional) relationships, because they have never been in one (friendly or romantic).
    Well , most of game have both anyway .
    But the problem with most of after 2004 MMORPG (age of WOW) is you can't share anything , or sharing option is very limited .
    One time tasks , bind items , instances ects
    The hard forced group don't work well , so they have to create easy forced random group lol

    As for ragnarok online and lineage 2 , they are "let share it and enjoy together" type of game . You can solo in those game , but because it easy to share the contents (mostly mob combat grind) so player naturally group together .

    Think about it , if you play ragnarok while run after quests , will you able to keep your newly meet friend close ? They also do they quests and you level too low to play same quest as them or you ready did the quest cause you have higher level .


    I don't think most games have both. I think most games after WoW are solo-centric one time run through instances with random signup pools.

    Companies eliminated sharing to try and shield against rmt organizations. I do agree changing the core design of your game for security reasons is just plain stupid. Security should be left out of the business product.

    In ragnarok online, you could mostly solo, yes (unless fighting hard monsters or raid bosses). However, in Lineage 2, it was pretty much impossible to solo. To get gear you had to have a dwarf class crafting the stuff. While leveling, this was best done in groups because of all the griefers (I used to call them running treasure boxes) running around. Then there is the political relationships you had to build to survive and get your clan/alliance to survive in the game. When you were grinding in those areas for months, you had to make friends or you just would not survive in the game.

    In regards to the question of playing with a newly met friend. Chances are we met doing something around the same level. If it's a rl friend, then I would just make an alt to play with him. It was never an issue.

    I Quit.

    http://www.mmorpg.com/discussion2.cfm/thread/436845/page/1 -> http://forums.mmorpg.com/discussion/436845/what-killed-mmorpgs-for-you/p1

    http://forums.anandtech.com/showthread.php?t=2316034
    .............
    Retired Gamer: all MMORPG's have been destroyed by big business, marketing of false promises, unprofessional game makers, and a generation of "I WIN and GIVE ME NOW" (brought to you by pokeman).

  • mgilbrtsnmgilbrtsn Member EpicPosts: 3,327
    Honestly, I don't play online games to make 'meaningful' relationships.  Casual relationships, sure.

    Concentrate on enjoying yourself, and not on why I shouldn't enjoy myself.

  • VengeSunsoarVengeSunsoar Member RarePosts: 6,590
    edited February 2017
    mgilbrtsn said:
    Honestly, I don't play online games to make 'meaningful' relationships.  Casual relationships, sure.
    And this right there is the issue. I'm right there with you. I don't think most people go to mmo (of any kind) games to build meaningful relationships. Casual online gaming acquaintances/sure. Would I be sad if I never saw them again. No. But do they make the moment more enjoyable? Yes.

    By all means construct areas for like minded people, absolutely I'm all for it, think it's a great idea. Just don't expect anything more than a very casual not even friendship, maybe more than acquaintance, a mate maybe or a companion maybe?.
    Just because you don't like it doesn't mean it is bad.
  • Gamer54321Gamer54321 Member UncommonPosts: 452
    OP's post sounds like kindergarden mentality to me. As if everybody ought to get along, if only the kindergarden building is there.
  • Gamer54321Gamer54321 Member UncommonPosts: 452
    I would expect some kind of clan solution, even if relying on the lowest common denoninator.

    So I would suggest:

    • Rely on the player's 'initiative' (motivations)
    • Which in turn.. leads to player options (ideally)
    • Thirdly, a game ought to not only have good means to communicate and get along in ways, but the game also has to be good.
  • sunandshadowsunandshadow Member RarePosts: 1,985
    I would expect some kind of clan solution, even if relying on the lowest common denoninator.

    So I would suggest:

    • Rely on the player's 'initiative' (motivations)
    • Which in turn.. leads to player options (ideally)
    • Thirdly, a game ought to not only have good means to communicate and get along in ways, but the game also has to be good.
    What they are talking about in the article is really more like dating kind of matchmaking, or like analyzing player's play to introduce them to others with similar play styles and online times.
    I want to help design and develop a PvE-focused, solo-friendly, sandpark MMO which combines crafting, monster hunting, and story.  So PM me if you are starting one.
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