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m2 SSD failure ? over time

huntersamhuntersam Member UncommonPosts: 210
I got myself a custom system and all seemed well for the first week , then the problems started it would not boot up from cold or suddenly lock for no apprent reason . Fast forward to a few weeks ago and it wassent back for repair and they apprently replaced the motherboard and main chip since they said there was a power issue with it . got it back 3 days ago and it has been redownloading my steam cataslog and i =noticed it wa sl;ocking up again so i removed the oc from 4.2 to started 3.3 and continued fine all night long then we had a power cut went to switch it on after it and it just kept on locking up . disabled the m2 in the bios and reinstalled windows on the other SSD no problems at all any idea how to resurrect the m2 or is it toast , I just feel that all the problems i have had from this system steams from having this flacky drive or has anyone else have any other ideas

Comments

  • VrikaVrika Member EpicPosts: 6,411
    edited August 2016
    At what point did the system keep locking up? Did it give any error messages?

    If you already have Windows installed on your other SSD, you should try:
    1. Re-enable the M2 SSD in BIOS
    2. Change boot order in BIOS so that the system will try to boot from your other SSD, not the M2 SSD

    With luck, your computer can boot from the BIOS on other SSD, and you can then inspect the M2 SSD from that Windows. If you get it to show on Windows, you can check if it's working with a program like HHDScan: 
      http://hddscan.com/


    But I don't know if your problem is with the SSD or with something else. If the SSD were the cause, then removing OC on your processor should not have helped.
     
  • huntersamhuntersam Member UncommonPosts: 210
    well thats what i was thinking but from the start i had trouble that why you automatically thought its the overclock but now i have thought about it the more i think i must of had a flaky drive from the word go and everyone was looking in the wrong direction but i will try and do what you suggest brb
  • huntersamhuntersam Member UncommonPosts: 210
    did another thin first tried to reinstallk windows after removing partition and formating got to 93% and locked up on me went back to other install booted fine might get them to send me a new m2 SSD as its onyl under the grahpcis card
  • huntersamhuntersam Member UncommonPosts: 210
    also another thing i noticed was my memory chips had two different timings one was 2800 which was right and the other had 2666 which is wrong , didnt think you could do that
  • VrikaVrika Member EpicPosts: 6,411
    edited August 2016
    huntersam said:
    also another thing i noticed was my memory chips had two different timings one was 2800 which was right and the other had 2666 which is wrong , didnt think you could do that
    You can mix RAMs with different speeds, but if you do that they should all run at the speed of slowest RAM. There's also a risk that different RAMs are incompatible with each other. Most of the time different RAMs will work just fine, but not always.

    If you have a spare USB stick, and don't need your computer for a while, you can test RAM with MemTest86
     http://www.memtest86.com/

    It's also possible that a problem with RAM would cause both instability, and something that looks like problems with HD as files get corrupted during installation/download/copying.
     
  • huntersamhuntersam Member UncommonPosts: 210
    will try that tomorrow after ive spoken to them dont want to fiddle too much still under warrety on site
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,078
    Post your full system specs.  I'd like to see what you've got.
  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,057
    It's the overclock, remove the overclock and 60% of the time, it works every time.




  • WizardryWizardry Member LegendaryPosts: 17,824
    There are ALWAYS factors never mentioned when comes to marketing.
    One example is showing us a CLEAN fresh HD,when we should be seeing results with tons of files loaded like in real time use.

    Same goes for GPU's,you cannot take hardware you see advertised as being 100% the same as what YOU would be buying over the counter.

    Good trend to make is to be VERY skeptical and see/test for yourself,don't believe what salesmen are trying to sell you or websites are advertising.
    There is ONLY one person you can trust....YOURSELF.

    Never forget 3 mile Island and never trust a government official or company spokesman.

  • NightliteNightlite Member UncommonPosts: 227
    I don't think you can get that OC on multiplier alone, or at least I would be surprised. Assuming there is some FSB play involved?

    Evidence says its the m.2, but gut says that memory is probably clocked over the top. 
  • CleffyCleffy Member RarePosts: 6,244
    m2 SSDs are like any other SSD. They have a maximum number of writes, which takes a while to fill, They slow down a bit as you near maximum capacity. When an SSD fails it's sudden. I had an SSD fail on me, and it goes from working to not booting at all. You could hit the maximum number of writes sooner since it has a faster transfer rate, but that would be a stretch since even with an m2 interface you won't reach it for years reading and writing constantly.
    Things that fail slowly are the PSU and memory.
  • syntax42syntax42 Member UncommonPosts: 1,378
    Cleffy said:
    m2 SSDs are like any other SSD. They have a maximum number of writes, which takes a while to fill, They slow down a bit as you near maximum capacity. When an SSD fails it's sudden. I had an SSD fail on me, and it goes from working to not booting at all. You could hit the maximum number of writes sooner since it has a faster transfer rate, but that would be a stretch since even with an m2 interface you won't reach it for years reading and writing constantly.
    Things that fail slowly are the PSU and memory.
    What you're referring to is exhausting the writes on the flash memory, which I doubt is the case.  Exhausting 2000 write cycles (minimum rating for modern SSDs) takes over 5 years of writing the entire capacity of the SSD every day.  I doubt they did this, as it would be difficult to do even by accident.

    SSDs can fail in other ways.  The most common failure I have seen is that they just stop working.  This could be just about anything failing on the circuit board.
  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,057
    Cleffy said:
    m2 SSDs are like any other SSD. They have a maximum number of writes, which takes a while to fill, They slow down a bit as you near maximum capacity. When an SSD fails it's sudden. I had an SSD fail on me, and it goes from working to not booting at all. You could hit the maximum number of writes sooner since it has a faster transfer rate, but that would be a stretch since even with an m2 interface you won't reach it for years reading and writing constantly.
    Things that fail slowly are the PSU and memory.
    I can't see a typical person hitting the write limit on a current SSD. It would take completely filling up and wiping the SSD several times a day for months.
  • huntersamhuntersam Member UncommonPosts: 210
    must of had the friday afternoon manufactring parts , so far ive had the motherboard & CPU replaced and getting a replacement m2 ssd sent to me not much more left  to replace . but the drive had definatly failed
  • RenoakuRenoaku Member EpicPosts: 3,124
    edited August 2016
    Buy Intel SSD only? seem to be the longest lasting?

    Also Standard HDD's if taken care of properly can last 11 years, got some 11 years old and still going lol.
  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,057
    Renoaku said:
    Also Standard HDD's if taken care of properly can last 11 years, got some 11 years old and still going lol.
    I think you mean "and if you get lucky" - not only if taken care of properly.

    And there is every indication that SSDs will follow the same trend - if your lucky, they ~can~ last a really long time.
  • TorvalTorval Member LegendaryPosts: 19,934
    Ridelynn said:
    Cleffy said:
    m2 SSDs are like any other SSD. They have a maximum number of writes, which takes a while to fill, They slow down a bit as you near maximum capacity. When an SSD fails it's sudden. I had an SSD fail on me, and it goes from working to not booting at all. You could hit the maximum number of writes sooner since it has a faster transfer rate, but that would be a stretch since even with an m2 interface you won't reach it for years reading and writing constantly.
    Things that fail slowly are the PSU and memory.
    I can't see a typical person hitting the write limit on a current SSD. It would take completely filling up and wiping the SSD several times a day for months.
    There's also more than one reason the SSD can fail. Reaching maximum writes would also be accompanied by a dramatic slowdown in performance. It could be that the internal controller failed, for whatever reason, and prevented access to the drive. It's not likely that maximum writes is the cause of the inability to read the drive at all.
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