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Bash and eMacs Coming to Windows 10 Natively [UPDATE] It's Ubuntu on Windows!

TorvalTorval Member LegendaryPosts: 20,018
edited March 2016 in Hardware
According to TechCrunch Microsoft will bring the Bash (bourne again shell) natively to Windows 10 as part of the summer update. This will allow Windows 10 users to use Bash commands, and more importantly, Bash shell scripts (.sh files) in Win10.

http://techcrunch.com/2016/03/30/be-very-afraid-hell-has-frozen-over-bash-is-coming-to-windows-10/

From the article:

Here is an announcement from Microsoft Build you probably didn’t see coming: Microsoft today announced that it is bringing the GNU project’s Bash shell to Windows. Bash (Bourne Again SHell) has long been a standard on OS X and many Linux distribution systems, while the default terminal for developers on Windows is Microsoft’s own PowerShell.

More importantly than bringing the shell over to Windows, developers will now be able to write their .sh Bash scripts on Windows, as well (or use Emacs to edit their code). Microsoft noted that this will work through a new Linux subsystem in Windows 10 that Microsoft worked on with Canonical.


Read the rest at the link provided.


This opens up a whole new world. I told my co-workers who sent me the article that my fantasy of a Windows UI and app environment on a posix framework really might come true one day.


UPDATE: Here is a very interesting and detailed blog by Canonical developer Dustin Kirkland: http://blog.dustinkirkland.com/2016/03/ubuntu-on-windows.html

He explains in better detail how it's working and what is going on.

Fedora - A modern, free, and open source Operating System. https://getfedora.org/

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Comments

  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,061
    Seems like you've been able to do this third party for a while now, but hardly anyone did, because... Windows.
  • AthisarAthisar Member UncommonPosts: 666
    It's aimed squarely at developers rather than Windows desktop users. At the moment you can do pretty much all of it via Cygwin (I use it to use bash, ssh, and other tools already), but this integration into the Windows kernel will make things far simpler, as you can use an unmodified Ubuntu base and use it more or less identically.
  • SEANMCADSEANMCAD Member EpicPosts: 16,775
    I used to be a huge Microsoft Fan boy to the point of annoyance to some.

    what changed I wonder

    Please do not respond to me, even if I ask you a question, its rhetorical.

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  • FlyByKnightFlyByKnight Member EpicPosts: 3,967
    ^ VR
    "As far as the forum code of conduct, I would think it's a bit outdated and in need of a refre *CLOSED*" 

    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • SEANMCADSEANMCAD Member EpicPosts: 16,775
    ^ VR
    I think failed smart phone market and Xbox One reveal being all about sports is what did it in for me..

    yeah and VR

    Please do not respond to me, even if I ask you a question, its rhetorical.

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  • TorvalTorval Member LegendaryPosts: 20,018
    edited March 2016
    Ridelynn said:
    Seems like you've been able to do this third party for a while now, but hardly anyone did, because... Windows.
    Like Athisar said this will be far simpler. Cygwin and MSYS, and MSYS2 are Linux binaries recompiled to run on Windows. This has always been a huge pain in the butt and a massive kludge. The Ubuntu binaries are the same files (same checksum) that run through a compatibility layer, think WINE in reverse.

    Whereas in Cygwin you still access the file system through native Windows syntax "C:\path\to\my\stuff\" in the native Ubuntu integration you access the file system through /mnt/c/path/to/my/stuff. This is actually pretty huge for ease of syntax and scripting.

    The native Ubuntu user space means access to apt, wget, python, gcc, pgp, grep, awk, find, sed, and all the other powerful tools.

    This is definitely targeted squarely at developers in a Windows environment that need to target other platforms.

    For me personally, as a data analyst, it means I have access to all the power of file manipulation and scripting tools in Linux while still being able to work directly on SQLServer and Oracle with access to Office, remote access (citrix and cisco), and other Windows programs and ecosystem.
    Fedora - A modern, free, and open source Operating System. https://getfedora.org/

    traveller, interloper, anomaly, iteration


  • LuidenLuiden Member UncommonPosts: 275
    This is pretty exciting, I've spent no time looking at Windows 10 though.  I've been around long enough to know not to touch something new from Microsoft until a few years in... as a OS does it seem 'business stable'?
  • AthisarAthisar Member UncommonPosts: 666
    edited March 2016
    Torval said:
    Whereas in Cygwin you still access the file system through native Windows syntax "C:\path\to\my\stuff\" in the native Ubuntu integration you access the file system through /mnt/c/path/to/my/stuff. This is actually pretty huge for ease of syntax and scripting.

    You can use '/cygdrive/c/' in Cygwin. It automatically creates directories for each drive.

    You're right of course that all the programs have to be recompiled for Windows, but the project does include a huge amount of up to date stuff packaged and pre-compiled. Not anywhere near as convenient as running a real Linux base, but it's very good as things stand.


  • TorvalTorval Member LegendaryPosts: 20,018
    We were talking about this in the break room this morning while making our coffees. I think this is more of a key victory and step of progress for Linux / Open Source / GNU.

    It was a positive step forward for Azure to work so well with Linux. It is great that .NET works on Linux and the source is mostly open. That is Microsoft making some things work on a niche ecosystem.

    But this is huge because it's Microsoft bringing Linux into its native desktop Windows environment. It's an acknowledgement, at least on some level, that it's relevant and significant.

    I've mostly been an MSYS user over the years, when I needed it, but, like cygwin, it's always been very bolted on. It feels bolted on. I'm hoping this will feel native and will affect the entire ecosystem for the better.
    Fedora - A modern, free, and open source Operating System. https://getfedora.org/

    traveller, interloper, anomaly, iteration


  • maskedweaselmaskedweasel Member EpicPosts: 10,647
    Luiden said:
    This is pretty exciting, I've spent no time looking at Windows 10 though.  I've been around long enough to know not to touch something new from Microsoft until a few years in... as a OS does it seem 'business stable'?
    Yes.  I've rolled it out across our business and it's been much more stable than windows 8.



  • TorvalTorval Member LegendaryPosts: 20,018
    Luiden said:
    This is pretty exciting, I've spent no time looking at Windows 10 though.  I've been around long enough to know not to touch something new from Microsoft until a few years in... as a OS does it seem 'business stable'?
    Yes.  I've rolled it out across our business and it's been much more stable than windows 8.
    Same. I use it at work and home. Not to say it's perfect, but it's good.
    Fedora - A modern, free, and open source Operating System. https://getfedora.org/

    traveller, interloper, anomaly, iteration


  • Jean-Luc_PicardJean-Luc_Picard Member LegendaryPosts: 8,347
    I'm already using a Linux VM for development, but this sounds interesting.
    "The ability to speak doesn't make you intelligent" - Qui-gon Jinn in Star Wars.
    After many years of reading Internet forums, there's no doubt that nor does the ability to write.
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  • CleffyCleffy Member RarePosts: 6,254
    edited April 2016
    That's not the big news in my opinion. There are only a couple developers who are Mac exclusive and do so out of spite. The Linux exclusive developers are purely on Linux due to the scope of their work, like servers. As a person who wants to sell software to the most amount of people, it really doesn't make sense to ignore 90% of the potential audience.
    The big news is a Win32 to Windows Unified Platform converter. The plethora of Win32 applications can be moved over to WinRT with little effort. So for a developer its an easy couple bucks. It also means you can bring your work related software to a continuum supported device relatively easily. This will be key to getting businesses to pickup Windows Phone to replace the traditional desktop.
    Post edited by Cleffy on
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