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EVE Tag-lines.

MkilbrideMkilbride Member UncommonPosts: 643

My favorite is "EVE - The best MMORPG you are paying not to play."

 

Truly, I like EVE. I do. I only played it for a month, but I found it somewhat absorbing.  Until after my trial and the pretty graphics faded away, I started to think "What did I do during my entire first month of play?"

 

Ran security missions for minimal ISK. Lost a ship because no one told me or is it explained anywhere in the tutorial that Auto-pilot goes through High-risk sectors on purpose / default to make you not want to use it. Learned me lesson there.

 

Besides that...I quened skills, and read books or watched TV while I waited, because anything I wanted to do...such as industry, mining perhaps, or go out and combat, takes at a minimum, weeks to train the right skills. I was also vastly more fortunate than people, as I met someone who gave me the lump sum of 650M ISK, simply because they liked a joke I told. So I had alot of freedom to do as I wished, more so than most in their first month. Yet I realize, despite all this money, I have little to show for it.  I have all +4 Implants.

 

http://eveboard.com/pilot/Maxx_Kilbride

 

This is me.  So I got around 3200SP in my first month, with training 24/h quenes,  with that booster you get  from the Steam pack, so I had like 30+ in every stat for my first two or so weeks. I spent countless hours in EVEMon, trying to decide where I wanted to go. Countless more on the wiki, reading about the ups and downs of each ship. More hours reading Guides to ensure I didn't screw myself over after the first ship I lost.  I blew 110M on a Gnosis to store away because people told me "Based on all limited availability ships, in the past they rise in price immensely, it's a good investment." Over a year later, I watch the market on EVE Central and see it's lost half it's value.  I purchased expensive ships and read the best load outs for them, and started on the path to be able to use them effectively.

 

And I spent alot of time having missions bug out on me, causing me to have to restart them or contact an EVE GM who could "Fix the issue".  I kept myself mostly in Hi-sec and tried to keep safe as everyone wants to destroy noobs for funsies.   I got frustrated with really poor combat. I mean, if it all works, it's fun, but the amount of clicking involved to make combat fun, makes SC2 look like a game you could play one handed.

 

I started to think as the majesty and the intrigue of it all wore down, and I finished reading Hyperion Cantos.(Amazing Sci-fi book, got me really interested in EVE, despite that most of HC doesn't involve any space battles.)  I wanted a Sci-fi game. I knew what I was getting into, I've played almost every MMORPG by this point, I knew the reputation.

 

I started to think and realized I had spent more time not "playing", but researching so for the rare times I did play, I could do so without a headache. While I did have fun, it became apparent that EVE is much like a job.  A more interesting job than most, I imagine, but never the less, a job. That requires more work and hours put into it to have any fun than most 40/h week jobs do.  I realized all the fun things I had heard about people doing, were months away. So I had to sit through months of waiting for my ship to read areas, my skills to train, to earn ISK for some more expensive stuff.

 

So what is your EVE Tag-line?

Help get Camelot Unchained made, a old-school MMORPG, with no hand holding!

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/13861848/camelot-unchained

Comments

  • RamanadjinnRamanadjinn Member UncommonPosts: 1,365

     

    My favorite line ever uttered about EVE Online was from a zero punctuation review.  Linked below if you're interested.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VMK8ID4RLZQ

     

     

    So I would have to go with:

     

    "EVE Online - Where the players are to nerds what nerds are to normal people."

     

     

    Disclaimer:  I'm not a hater.  I consider EVE to be the #1 greatest MMORPG of all time.

  • MkilbrideMkilbride Member UncommonPosts: 643

    That's pretty good, and accurate.

     

    I have a friend who hardcore raids WoW. I dunno he does it, but yeah he does it, you know, like...a schedule...for a game.  And he looks at EVE players and is like "Damn nerds."

    Help get Camelot Unchained made, a old-school MMORPG, with no hand holding!

    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/13861848/camelot-unchained

  • IkedaIkeda Member RarePosts: 2,751

    I had to check the date to ensure I wasn't missing something.

    1 month, 30 days, worth of training is roughly 1.4million skill points.  Not sure where 3,200 came from.

    If you did the initial 5 tutorial missions, that's roughly 6 ships over the course of 2-3 days with 1 of those being a mining vessel, 1 a destroyer, and one a basic hauler.

    THEN you do the sisters of Eve arc.  Even if you don't finish (that last kill is hard as hell), you'll earn roughly 10-15 million ISK.  That's enough to equip some decent stuff.  Autopilot is NEVER a good idea as you jump into the zone WAY far away.  It's about 2-3x faster if you warp to 0, jump, warp to 0, jump.

    Exploration, from scratch, takes about 2-3 days worth of skills to be USEFUL.  But during those times, you're still running around practicing.  Mining and industry do take longer.  Just wait until you get into all the different mineral processing skills.  I've never cared for mining, but I do like hauling stuff in my Badger II.  That did take quite a bit of time previously.

    Gnosis' were given away for free, they are attacked because they are unique, and honestly I bought one for about 50m.  So I can't see paying 100m for them.

    In 2 weeks back, I'm running around Amarr.  My typical exploration circle is .7, .6, .4, .6, .7.  Never ONCE in the 2 weeks had one ganker/hater/whatever.  I'm not saying they don't exist, I just haven't run across them.

    Finally,

    "I purchased expensive ships and read the best load outs for them, and started on the path to be able to use them effectively"

    That is EXACTLY what is wrong with people in Eve.  There isn't necessarily a "best" ship.  It's rock-paper-scissors.  Frigates can kill BC's if they're specc'd right.  It's true, I'm sorry, that you don't have a ton of SP's.  But I've been in noob chat and help chat with plenty of others playing and learning Eve.  You know how many people have said "Hey, I just got my ship, where can I go to kill other people?"  Hahah.  A new player, with no skills.  Right.

    If you're truly interested, I recommend Eve U.  Or the help channels.  They're fun, helpful, and help avoid issues.

     

    P.S.  Last night, I bought 5 exploration Heron's, fully loaded (with the exception that I bought Sisters of Eve probes and launcher), for under 12m.  I made back 60m on my first couple of explorations.  My ONE gripe is I keep finding wormholes/combat missions which I'm avoiding at the moment due to the Sansha "incident" from the other day.  (it's in a different thread)

  • RylahRylah Member UncommonPosts: 194

    The really fun things in EvE - you cannot do them alone or solo without reaching old age pension. EvE is a game where you specialize in something and then stick to it, or you have multiple accounts which you specialize in different things.

    So go join a decent corp and you will have fun. Simple as that. Even if you want to specialize in solo ganking it is better to be in a corp or like mined people and learn from others.

    Instead of a tagline: http://www.cad-comic.com/cad/20120625

  • KyleranKyleran Member LegendaryPosts: 37,030
    "Never fly what you can't afford to lose"

    So many tears would be avoided if people would just follow this simple rule.

    "See normal people, I'm not one of them" | G-Easy & Big Sean

    "I need to finish" - Christian Wolff: The Accountant

    Just trying to live long enough to play a new, released MMORPG, playing FO76 at the moment.

    Fools find no pleasure in understanding, but delight in airing their own opinions. Pvbs 18:2, NIV

    Don't just play games, inhabit virtual worlds™

    "This is the most intelligent, well qualified and articulate response to a post I have ever seen on these forums. It's a shame most people here won't have the attention span to read past the second line." - Anon






  • SoandsosoSoandsoso Member Posts: 533

    1) All that reading and research you have done...you are already ahead of the curve.

    2) If you are still interested in playing Eve I would suggest some notable corps.

     

    Brave Newbies - Have their hands in everything, very large corp and they are fun as hell. Very new pilot friendly.

    Eve University - Same as Brave Newbies, harder to get into. And have a very structured way of training new pilots

    Red vs Blue - They just love to blow stuff up in frigs and cruisers. Good for new pilots looking to pvp.

     

     

    One of the key things about Eve...The player has to decide what they want to do in game and stick to it.

     

    Oh ya, Not all Faction modules are better than Meta 4, and not all Meta 4 are better than Meta 3. But the price difference between them would lead you to think otherwise.

     

     

    1 year in Eve now, spent the first 3 months reading and watching youtube videos to learn as much as I could. Thought my head would explode. But now, as I explore and roam wormhole space (3 days in to this new path), I must say the excitement of finding an untouched wormhole with all that  potential isk and having to hit dscan constantly is worth the time invested.

     

  • CaldicotCaldicot Member UncommonPosts: 451
    What was the joke? image

    If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe. - Carl Sagan

  • hfztthfztt Member RarePosts: 1,393
  • DJProfKDJProfK Member Posts: 19
    Originally posted by Ikeda

    I had to check the date to ensure I wasn't missing something.

    1 month, 30 days, worth of training is roughly 1.4million skill points.  Not sure where 3,200 came from.

    If you did the initial 5 tutorial (...)

     

    Yeah, yeah and yeah and how is a normal player prone to know all this? 

    We know this because we play/played the game.

     

    New players are bound to get lost very, very quickly if they don't have a hand to point them in the correct way, and evan that hand pointing it can still lead them to their demise.

  • MukeMuke Member RarePosts: 2,614
    Originally posted by Mkilbride

    My favorite is "EVE - The best MMORPG you are paying not to play."

     

    Truly, I like EVE. I do. I only played it for a month, but I found it somewhat absorbing.  Until after my trial and the pretty graphics faded away, I started to think "What did I do during my entire first month of play?"

     

    Ran security missions for minimal ISK. Lost a ship because no one told me or is it explained anywhere in the tutorial that Auto-pilot goes through High-risk sectors on purpose / default to make you not want to use it. Learned me lesson there.

     

    Besides that...I quened skills, and read books or watched TV while I waited, because anything I wanted to do...such as industry, mining perhaps, or go out and combat, takes at a minimum, weeks to train the right skills. I was also vastly more fortunate than people, as I met someone who gave me the lump sum of 650M ISK, simply because they liked a joke I told. So I had alot of freedom to do as I wished, more so than most in their first month. Yet I realize, despite all this money, I have little to show for it.  I have all +4 Implants.

     

    http://eveboard.com/pilot/Maxx_Kilbride

     

    This is me.  So I got around 3200SP in my first month, with training 24/h quenes,  with that booster you get  from the Steam pack, so I had like 30+ in every stat for my first two or so weeks. I spent countless hours in EVEMon, trying to decide where I wanted to go. Countless more on the wiki, reading about the ups and downs of each ship. More hours reading Guides to ensure I didn't screw myself over after the first ship I lost.  I blew 110M on a Gnosis to store away because people told me "Based on all limited availability ships, in the past they rise in price immensely, it's a good investment." Over a year later, I watch the market on EVE Central and see it's lost half it's value.  I purchased expensive ships and read the best load outs for them, and started on the path to be able to use them effectively.

     

    And I spent alot of time having missions bug out on me, causing me to have to restart them or contact an EVE GM who could "Fix the issue".  I kept myself mostly in Hi-sec and tried to keep safe as everyone wants to destroy noobs for funsies.   I got frustrated with really poor combat. I mean, if it all works, it's fun, but the amount of clicking involved to make combat fun, makes SC2 look like a game you could play one handed.

     

    I started to think as the majesty and the intrigue of it all wore down, and I finished reading Hyperion Cantos.(Amazing Sci-fi book, got me really interested in EVE, despite that most of HC doesn't involve any space battles.)  I wanted a Sci-fi game. I knew what I was getting into, I've played almost every MMORPG by this point, I knew the reputation.

     

    I started to think and realized I had spent more time not "playing", but researching so for the rare times I did play, I could do so without a headache. While I did have fun, it became apparent that EVE is much like a job.  A more interesting job than most, I imagine, but never the less, a job. That requires more work and hours put into it to have any fun than most 40/h week jobs do.  I realized all the fun things I had heard about people doing, were months away. So I had to sit through months of waiting for my ship to read areas, my skills to train, to earn ISK for some more expensive stuff.

     

    So what is your EVE Tag-line?

    So you spent a year in highsec doing PVE, and you complain about being bored?

    "going into arguments with idiots is a lost cause, it requires you to stoop down to their level and you can't win"

  • uplink4242uplink4242 Member UncommonPosts: 257

    Well as you found out by yourself, the game is rather boring if you don't set goals for yourself.

    It really helps if you find friends to do things with, or venture trying to learn the game by yourself (some people enjoy that). This was my progression during my first 2 months in the game:

    - I did low level missions until level 3s to raise standings and improve combat skills. 

    - I joined a corporation with a base on a wormhole system, so I learned a lot about how to stay safe in dangerous environments. I used to mine gas, perform the daily scanning for entrances and sites and sometimes scout the surroundings for friends to mine/haul safely.

    -I did some ninja looting and salvaging, finding other people's ships running missions and stealing loot. It was quite a good isk earner at that stage, and taught me a lot about combat/agression mechanics.

    - I did a lot of exploration sites, going around with an expedition frigate into nullsec dodging gatecamps and finding relic/hacking signatures for loot. This again taught me a lot about staying safe in hostile space

    - I did a lot of roaming into unknown wormhole systems, looking to find a good empty place that could sell to other players. Sometimes it would take me days witouth going back to known space. Made me a lot of isk when I was lucky, it was also interesting having to 'negociate' with other players about my findings. I even once managed to 'scam' a guy about paying me for a system that was already inhabited. :P

    - I learned how to do planetary interaction, which was another nice ISK source, especially on wormhole planets. It was pretty hazardous trying to get stuff on and off planets in wormhole space at times.

    - I made enough isk to confortably start plexing my account around 3 months into the game. 

    Sure, Eve can be boring when you start, but it can also be really interesting if you are willing to learn it. The secret to have fun in the game is to stop repeating the same things over and over again and instead look for opportunities for different kinds of gameplay. It's what the game really shines at, and if you aren't take advantage of it then you're better off playing something else. The game may be complex and intimidating to learn, but it's also extensively documented on the internet by now. 

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