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Cliff Bleszinski is Done With Making Disc-Based Video Games and is Moving on to PC Steam

ElRenmazuoElRenmazuo Member RarePosts: 5,361

http://www.gametrailers.com/side-mission/69817/cliff-bleszinski-is-done-with-making-disc-based-video-games

In an interview with Gamasutra, former Epic developer Cliff Bleszinski says that he'll never make another disc-based game in his career while also offering a stance on the future of game reveals.

"The whole 'old guard,' where you get a Game Informer cover and an E3 reveal, is dead," Bleszinski said. "I'll never make another disc-based game for the rest of my career, and [at E3] they're trying to woo buyers from Target and Walmart?"

Right now, Bleszinski and his wife is hooked on Steam Early Access game Rust and explains why PC is where he wants to go.

"Your game is as good as how many YouTube videos it can yield. My wife and I are totally hooked on Rust right now. It's not about the 'new user experience'; in these games the new user experience is utter shit, and it's okay. There are two lessons people have not learned from Minecraft: Get the game out there and build it. Some kid will put out a video. Players will teach each other. You don't need the 'press A to jump.'

"PC is where I'm going to wind up. That's where the community is. The trend will always be the core. If I start a studio, I want a community manager there day one. I want weekly video or podcasts; I want task lists available on the subreddit. When my wife and I play Rust, before we play, we check the subreddit. Whenever you get a little bored with a game, someone issues an update. I feel like a game developer again, where I get to check out the build list."

Bleszinski is currently developing an unannounced game which he has teased with a few mysterious screenshots
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Comments

  • JJ82JJ82 Member UncommonPosts: 1,258

    Its ok, he hasn't made a game worth owning for a while now anyway so let him turn to leasing out his crap at full price, at least with steam we would only have to wait for it to come up for a discount so its worth the blandness that it is.

    And yeah, I was a major Unreal Tournament player. I have the ability to say good and bad about something/one. His last 5 games were blandfests, Shadow Complex, Fat Princess, Lost Planet 2, Bulletstorm and GoW 3.

    "People who tell you you’re awesome are useless. No, dangerous.

    They are worse than useless because you want to believe them. They will defend you against critiques that are valid. They will seduce you into believing you are done learning, or into thinking that your work is better than it actually is." ~Raph Koster
    http://www.raphkoster.com/2013/10/14/on-getting-criticism/

  • PrecusorPrecusor Member UncommonPosts: 3,589
    It took him almost a decade to figure that out..
  • goboygogoboygo Member RarePosts: 2,140
    Originally posted by Precusor
    It took him almost a decade to figure that out..

    Forest through the trees, I have never lost track of what I like even though the industry has.

  • DrakynnDrakynn Member Posts: 2,030
    Wait so the guy that has repeatedly insulted PC gaming and the PC Gaming community whilst suckling at the MS Xbox teat now says that's where it's at?
  • DalanonDalanon Member UncommonPosts: 126
    I saw this article today and all I could think is that this guy needs a public relations coach.  Instead of focusing on being free thinking and blazing his own path, he basically just insults people who liked his previous games and comes off sounding like an "epic" jerk....see what I did there.

    Not all who wander are lost...

  • TheLizardbonesTheLizardbones Member CommonPosts: 10,910

    I think there is some merit to what he's saying about Minecraft and Rust.  The games released to the public in an unfinished state, but are being worked on regularly.  Players are happy with this.  I don't think this is something that would work with MMORPGs, but for games that run at a smaller scale?  It seems to work great.

     

    I can not remember winning or losing a single debate on the internet.

  • ZagaZaga Member Posts: 23
    "Former epic developer" is right.
  • TheBigDRCTheBigDRC Member Posts: 162

    He goes from PC dev, to Xbox (screw everyone else) dev, and then back to PC dev? image

    I feel like his importance to the gaming scene in general has lost relevance over time. Wait for about 5 to 7 years, he'll likely hop back to being console exclusive.

    I will say, though, he's not the first to take on this whole "Gaming Messiah" attitude. And it's getting annoying.

    You know what's fun about chaos? I do, but I won't tell.

  • funyahnsfunyahns Member Posts: 315
     I don't like the guy from the stuff he has talked about. He is constantly defending the costs of AAA production and attacking consumers.  Well good luck to him. Whatever he is making I have very little interest in. Never even tried his game.
  • PrecusorPrecusor Member UncommonPosts: 3,589
    Originally posted by Dalanon
    I saw this article today and all I could think is that this guy needs a public relations coach.  Instead of focusing on being free thinking and blazing his own path, he basically just insults people who liked his previous games and comes off sounding like an "epic" jerk....see what I did there.

    He used to troll and trash PC gaming.

     

    example

    Cliff Bleszinski Says PC Gaming in "Disarray"

    http://voices.yahoo.com/cliff-bleszinski-says-pc-gaming-disarray-1038715.html

  • TorvalTorval Member LegendaryPosts: 20,291

    Development culture is changing. I think we'll see a lot of changes this direction. We'll see more digital releases and I think Microsoft and Sony will head this direction as well with XB1 and PS4. That's not the only changes we're going to see, but it's a big one.

    He's not the only one making changes. Irrational games shut down. The Ken Levine and the core dev team want to make different games a different way.

    Fedora - A modern, free, and open source Operating System. https://getfedora.org/

    traveller, interloper, anomaly, iteration


  • DamonVileDamonVile Member CommonPosts: 4,818
    Originally posted by lizardbones

    I think there is some merit to what he's saying about Minecraft and Rust.  The games released to the public in an unfinished state, but are being worked on regularly.  Players are happy with this.  I don't think this is something that would work with MMORPGs, but for games that run at a smaller scale?  It seems to work great.

     

    It seems to be working for landmark. Well they call it an alpha with a $60 buy in....I call that an unfinished game they took money for. As far as I can tell the people I know who like that style of game have been enjoying a 40% finished mmo.

  • Kevyne-ShandrisKevyne-Shandris Member UncommonPosts: 2,077

    Those comments are going to sound outdated and so premature when another tech emerges.

     

    A cartridge/protected disk that can hold TBs of data? Moving local data will always be faster than the internet.

     

    Yeah, very outdated.

  • stevebombsquadstevebombsquad Member UncommonPosts: 884
    Originally posted by Kevyne-Shandris

    Those comments are going to sound outdated and so premature when another tech emerges.

     

    A cartridge/protected disk that can hold TBs of data? Moving local data will always be faster than the internet.

     

    Yeah, very outdated.

    It reality, it isn't about what is faster. It is about what is "fast enough."

    James T. Kirk: All she's got isn't good enough! What else ya got?

  • Kevyne-ShandrisKevyne-Shandris Member UncommonPosts: 2,077
    Originally posted by stevebombsquad
    Originally posted by Kevyne-Shandris

    Those comments are going to sound outdated and so premature when another tech emerges.

     

    A cartridge/protected disk that can hold TBs of data? Moving local data will always be faster than the internet.

     

    Yeah, very outdated.

    It reality, it isn't about what is faster. It is about what is "fast enough."

    What wisdom is that, when we can't predict the future?

     

    By your standard 300 baud internet would be "fast enough", because anyone can say this or that speed is acceptable. I have 100Mb internet today, but 14 years ago 3Mb was blazing (faster than a T1 line). I don't consider 3Mb internet fast today at all...and the internet isn't portable. DNS server goes down...no Steam to even worry about.

     

    Tech changes things rather quickly, in a blink of the eye in time.

  • PhryPhry Member LegendaryPosts: 11,004
    Originally posted by Kevyne-Shandris
    Originally posted by stevebombsquad
    Originally posted by Kevyne-Shandris

    Those comments are going to sound outdated and so premature when another tech emerges.

     

    A cartridge/protected disk that can hold TBs of data? Moving local data will always be faster than the internet.

     

    Yeah, very outdated.

    It reality, it isn't about what is faster. It is about what is "fast enough."

    What wisdom is that, when we can't predict the future?

     

    By your standard 300 baud internet would be "fast enough", because anyone can say this or that speed is acceptable. I have 100Mb internet today, but 14 years ago 3Mb was blazing (faster than a T1 line). I don't consider 3Mb internet fast today at all...and the internet isn't portable. DNS server goes down...no Steam to even worry about.

     

    Tech changes things rather quickly, in a blink of the eye in time.

    its unlikely that a cartridge system would really work, too expensive, and with the cost of HD being really cheap, it is far more convenient to just download things, even if we're talking a few 100gb of data (which we aren't!) but downloading 30 - 50 gb is really nothing, that the PC has been moving away from physical discs for the last few years, is no surprise, it would also be no surprise if consoles do the same thing, even the WII supports that after all and you can even expand the memory with SD cards, and thats just the Wii!

    While i would agree that improvements to tech will continue and who knows what storage mediums will be available in the future, but the medium by which data is transported is in all probability going to be increasingly through the internet or its equivalent, because while the storage media increases in size/capacity, so will the transport medium increase in bandwidth/speed, as has already been demonstrated.image

  • MindTriggerMindTrigger Member Posts: 2,596
    How avant garde of him....   

    A sure sign that you are in an old, dying paradigm/mindset, is when you are scared of new ideas and new technology. Don't feel bad. The world is moving on without you, and you are welcome to yell "Get Off My Lawn!" all you want while it happens. You cannot, however, stop an idea whose time has come.

  • TheLizardbonesTheLizardbones Member CommonPosts: 10,910
    Originally posted by DamonVile
    Originally posted by lizardbones

    I think there is some merit to what he's saying about Minecraft and Rust.  The games released to the public in an unfinished state, but are being worked on regularly.  Players are happy with this.  I don't think this is something that would work with MMORPGs, but for games that run at a smaller scale?  It seems to work great.

     

    It seems to be working for landmark. Well they call it an alpha with a $60 buy in....I call that an unfinished game they took money for. As far as I can tell the people I know who like that style of game have been enjoying a 40% finished mmo.

     

    I think the difference is the speed of updates to the games, and type of updates to the games. 

     

    MMORPGs introduce new content at a slow pace.  One update a month would be a phenomenally fast update cycle for an MMORPG.  The content introduced in an MMORPG doesn't usually make dramatic changes to the game's mechanics, and doesn't usually introduce brand new mechanics  or remove existing mechanics.  It certainly doesn't happen on a monthly basis.

     

    Games like Rust or Minecraft, small scale MMORPG-like games can introduce content at a fast pace.  Minecraft has been introducing updates monthly, with some breaks and some faster updates for a couple of years that I'm aware of.  The type of updates include new content, but also changes to game mechanics.  New mechanics that globally affect game play are introduced on a regular basis, and mechanics that eliminate existing mechanics are introduced as well on a regular basis.

     

    There are a couple of reasons why there are differences like this.  One is scope of the projects involved.  MMORPGs involve a wider range of disciplines to develop and maintain.  Additional content is more costly to an MMORPG developer than to a MMORPG-like game developer.  The teams involved in MMORPGs are generally larger, sometimes much larger than the teams involved in MMORPG-like development.  The second reason is the players themselves.  MMORPG players get really p!ssy about small changes to class balance, never mind a global game change that might affect everyone in different ways.  Players of the MMORPG-like games (in my experience, I could be wrong since I'm generalizing here) seem to not only adapt to the changes, they seem to want the changes that MMORPG players would not want. 

     

    Landmark has built their core mechanic.  People can log in and build things, Minecraft style.  That is most of the game play.  For some people, it's 100% of the game play.  The other stuff that will come later is just an extra, and I bet many of the people playing don't even care.  Landmark is an MMORPG-like game right now, and people have a different set of expectations for it.  If it ever becomes an MMORPG, the player expectations will probably be very different.  Something that changes how long it takes to acquire new building tools would not be accepted nearly as quickly as it is right now.  Just wait and watch the uproar when they add fast travel options and take away the ability to fly outside of each player's Landmark area.

     

    I can not remember winning or losing a single debate on the internet.

  • FoomerangFoomerang Member UncommonPosts: 5,627

    Dude loves to burn bridges. Thought never occurred to him that he could release console games without a disc as well?

  • iridescenceiridescence Member UncommonPosts: 1,552
    Originally posted by lizardbones

    I think there is some merit to what he's saying about Minecraft and Rust.  The games released to the public in an unfinished state, but are being worked on regularly.  

    For every success story you can find 10 "early access" games cluttering up Steam which are unfinished and have no concrete plans to ever be finished.  You have to also imagine what incentive devs have to even finish the games also when it appears many people are just as happy buying them when they're half done.

     

    As a life long PC gamer I think this trend is a bigger threat to the games I enjoy than consoles ever were.

     

  • Kevyne-ShandrisKevyne-Shandris Member UncommonPosts: 2,077
    Originally posted by Phry
    Originally posted by Kevyne-Shandris
    Originally posted by stevebombsquad
    Originally posted by Kevyne-Shandris

    Those comments are going to sound outdated and so premature when another tech emerges.

     

    A cartridge/protected disk that can hold TBs of data? Moving local data will always be faster than the internet.

     

    Yeah, very outdated.

    It reality, it isn't about what is faster. It is about what is "fast enough."

    What wisdom is that, when we can't predict the future?

     

    By your standard 300 baud internet would be "fast enough", because anyone can say this or that speed is acceptable. I have 100Mb internet today, but 14 years ago 3Mb was blazing (faster than a T1 line). I don't consider 3Mb internet fast today at all...and the internet isn't portable. DNS server goes down...no Steam to even worry about.

     

    Tech changes things rather quickly, in a blink of the eye in time.

    its unlikely that a cartridge system would really work, too expensive, and with the cost of HD being really cheap, it is far more convenient to just download things, even if we're talking a few 100gb of data (which we aren't!) but downloading 30 - 50 gb is really nothing, that the PC has been moving away from physical discs for the last few years, is no surprise, it would also be no surprise if consoles do the same thing, even the WII supports that after all and you can even expand the memory with SD cards, and thats just the Wii!

    While i would agree that improvements to tech will continue and who knows what storage mediums will be available in the future, but the medium by which data is transported is in all probability going to be increasingly through the internet or its equivalent, because while the storage media increases in size/capacity, so will the transport medium increase in bandwidth/speed, as has already been demonstrated.image

    All that is conventional thinking.

     

    But what happens if a medium comes available, be it disk or protected media, that can hold enough data that a publisher can put a huge chunk of data on it and cheaper than the internet structure to serve downloads?

     

    Steam et. al. could become buggy whip makers.

  • MindTriggerMindTrigger Member Posts: 2,596
    Originally posted by Kevyne-Shandris
    Originally posted by Phry
    Originally posted by Kevyne-Shandris
    Originally posted by stevebombsquad
    Originally posted by Kevyne-Shandris

    Those comments are going to sound outdated and so premature when another tech emerges.

     

    A cartridge/protected disk that can hold TBs of data? Moving local data will always be faster than the internet.

     

    Yeah, very outdated.

    It reality, it isn't about what is faster. It is about what is "fast enough."

    What wisdom is that, when we can't predict the future?

     

    By your standard 300 baud internet would be "fast enough", because anyone can say this or that speed is acceptable. I have 100Mb internet today, but 14 years ago 3Mb was blazing (faster than a T1 line). I don't consider 3Mb internet fast today at all...and the internet isn't portable. DNS server goes down...no Steam to even worry about.

     

    Tech changes things rather quickly, in a blink of the eye in time.

    its unlikely that a cartridge system would really work, too expensive, and with the cost of HD being really cheap, it is far more convenient to just download things, even if we're talking a few 100gb of data (which we aren't!) but downloading 30 - 50 gb is really nothing, that the PC has been moving away from physical discs for the last few years, is no surprise, it would also be no surprise if consoles do the same thing, even the WII supports that after all and you can even expand the memory with SD cards, and thats just the Wii!

    While i would agree that improvements to tech will continue and who knows what storage mediums will be available in the future, but the medium by which data is transported is in all probability going to be increasingly through the internet or its equivalent, because while the storage media increases in size/capacity, so will the transport medium increase in bandwidth/speed, as has already been demonstrated.image

    All that is conventional thinking.

     

    But what happens if a medium comes available, be it disk or protected media, that can hold enough data that a publisher can put a huge chunk of data on it and cheaper than the internet structure to serve downloads?

     

    Steam et. al. could become buggy whip makers.

    Never going to happen.  I'm a 21 year IT professional, and physical media is nothing but a nightmare.  Doesn't matter what form factor it is. I consider it extremely archaic if a vendor delivers anything software via physical media rather than download.  On the logistics side, you also have to deal with design, manufacturing, packaging, shipping and everything else related to physical media.  

    Computing in general is going to be increasingly cloud oriented in the coming years.  Most people will end up with the equivalent of 'dumb terminal' computer in the future, with storage, processing, etc. being done in the cloud (think Chromebook but much better).  Of course until the internet rivals bus speeds, people who need on-demand power with low latency will continue to use conventional computers.

     

    A sure sign that you are in an old, dying paradigm/mindset, is when you are scared of new ideas and new technology. Don't feel bad. The world is moving on without you, and you are welcome to yell "Get Off My Lawn!" all you want while it happens. You cannot, however, stop an idea whose time has come.

  • TheLizardbonesTheLizardbones Member CommonPosts: 10,910
    Originally posted by iridescence
    Originally posted by lizardbones

    I think there is some merit to what he's saying about Minecraft and Rust.  The games released to the public in an unfinished state, but are being worked on regularly.  

    For every success story you can find 10 "early access" games cluttering up Steam which are unfinished and have no concrete plans to ever be finished.  You have to also imagine what incentive devs have to even finish the games also when it appears many people are just as happy buying them when they're half done.

     

    As a life long PC gamer I think this trend is a bigger threat to the games I enjoy than consoles ever were.

     

     

    For every finished game that doesn't suck, there are ten that do, except they tend to be more expensive until they go on sale.  The buyer should always be careful about what they are buying into or they risk wasting their money.  Early access doesn't change that rule.

     

    I can not remember winning or losing a single debate on the internet.

  • SpottyGekkoSpottyGekko Member EpicPosts: 6,916

    Sounds like none of his former "console buddies" want to finance his new game venture, so suddenly the PC platform is "where it's at" ?

    In 2 months' time someone will ask him about Rust in an interview and he'll say "What's that ?"

  • Kevyne-ShandrisKevyne-Shandris Member UncommonPosts: 2,077
    Originally posted by MindTrigger
    Never going to happen.  I'm a 21 year IT professional, and physical media is nothing but a nightmare.
     

    A tech in 5 years can make those statements moot, and you'll a be a wiser 26 IT professional (what  IT "professional" is 21 years-old?).

     

    Here's a question for you: do you think "clouds" are diskless?

     

    Physical media will always exist. We sure didn't get rid of paper with the computer, despite all the promises.

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