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hurriedcorgihurriedcorgi Member Posts: 16

I remember in the late 90's where I couldn't wait for every single new game to come out and they were all awesome and new and fun in some way or another. I feel like I've spent more time since the mid-2000's looking for a decent MMO to play than I have actually played one! I just don't know what to do anymore...

-Matt

Comments

  • RaysheRayshe Member UncommonPosts: 1,279

    I feel your pain matt, i've been feeling the same way for awhile. i have a grand total of 2 game (not MMO just in general) that i have any interest in playing right now, one is SSX the other is TSW.

    Because i can.
    I'm Hopeful For Every Game, Until the Fan Boys Attack My Games. Then the Knives Come Out.
    Logic every gamers worst enemy.

  • ZekiahZekiah Member UncommonPosts: 2,483

    Yep, you me both.

    I really don't have an answer other than save your money and hope developers get a clue.

    "Censorship is never over for those who have experienced it. It is a brand on the imagination that affects the individual who has suffered it, forever." - Noam Chomsky

  • TanonTanon Member UncommonPosts: 176

    Learn Korean, play the upcoming Korean MMOs. Done and done.

  • Larry145Larry145 Member Posts: 8

    Very cool!

  • WaldoCornWaldoCorn Member UncommonPosts: 235

    I think, that in the early days of gaming, many of those who created games, where creative people, who found game creation, the right outlet for their creativity. They did what they did, almost as an art form, on shoestring budgets, never dreaming of riches, and were doing the work, from passion.

    With the financial success of WoW, primarily, numbers became the focus, granted it took a few years for that to sink in. This I believe changed the focus, from passion, to yield. Rather than people doing the work from passion, they did it with hopes of riches.

    Not that there arent passionate creative teams, but rather, they are neutered  by the bottom line, and waves of worker bee's who have never had an orginal thought.

    This leaves the players, the most important factor of any game, un enthused, and well aware of the fact, they aren't playing, "their game," any more, but rather, being allowed to play someone elses, financial tool.

     

    See the world and all within it.
    Live a lifetime in every minute.

  • J2KhouriJ2Khouri Member UncommonPosts: 31

    Originally posted by WaldoCorn

    I think, that in the early days of gaming, many of those who created games, where creative people, who found game creation, the right outlet for their creativity. They did what they did, almost as an art form, on shoestring budgets, never dreaming of riches, and were doing the work, from passion.

    With the financial success of WoW, primarily, numbers became the focus, granted it took a few years for that to sink in. This I believe changed the focus, from passion, to yield. Rather than people doing the work from passion, they did it with hopes of riches.

    Not that there arent passionate creative teams, but rather, they are neutered  by the bottom line, and waves of worker bee's who have never had an orginal thought.

    This leaves the players, the most important factor of any game, un enthused, and well aware of the fact, they aren't playing, "their game," any more, but rather, being allowed to play someone elses, financial tool.

     

    Uh... d...damn dude. You just depressed me for the whole night, thanks a lot.

  • tazarconantazarconan Member Posts: 1,013

    Originally posted by hurriedcorgi

    I remember in the late 90's where I couldn't wait for every single new game to come out and they were all awesome and new and fun in some way or another. I feel like I've spent more time since the mid-2000's looking for a decent MMO to play than I have actually played one! I just don't know what to do anymore...

    -Matt

    I ve quitted mmorpg's last 9 months . Me and 2 other rl friends are burned with age of wonders shadow magic multiplayer 1v1v1 with 5 computer players on extra large maps and its a hell of a burning heh.Brings back some of the good old times of Heroes of might and magic memories back.

    Other than that there is always sid meyers pirates ,Sacred  alongside with moororwind+skyrim and baldur's gate2 and fifa manager 07 to fill the gasps ;P

    To your notification now. Games that are coming out nowdays are a complete crap and garbage in gameplay , design,imagination from the programmers side. I cant recall a game similar to gameplay and addiction to Pirates x-com series,baldur's gate list is real long. There are only very few exceptions from time to time  (Skyrim,Fallout vegas both from bethesda btw)   but other than that its all crap games illustrated with super graficks and impressing efrfects but with gameplay depth to zero lvl that matches the iq of the ppl that make it or the consumers if u prefer (thats us).

     

     

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,262

    I thought it was the other way around.  Not much in the way of great games in the early 80's because the hardware wasn't powerful enough, then some really good ones in the late 80s and early 90s once the hardware could handle more.  In the late 90s, too much was trying to hype 3D stuff that didn't look very good and didn't let you control things nearly as well as a 2D game, so there weren't any great games and not that many pretty good ones.  And then more recently, companies have figured out what to do with the Internet and there are some really good games out there.

  • Jaco1101Jaco1101 Member Posts: 37

    Let me first say that I have very fond memories of my very first MMO experience(es) just like the many of you who have been playing MMO's for years.

     

    For me, I have simply come to the conclusion that the reason the old days seem so great is that everything was new.  Things suprised me.  I did not know that these things were possible in an online multiplayer game.  I was shocked.  I was impressed.  I was astounded.  I was freaking loving it.

     

    I'm happy I was around to be able to experience it when I did.  I imagine that when "Jimmy Jr." plays his first MMO on his daddy's spare PC he has the same sort of bewilderment. 

     

    For all of us who have gone through that initial "rush", we will continue to look and look and look to try to satisfy that rush again although we will never achieve it.  Never tried it, but I think it could almost be descirbed as a Meth addiction even for the casual gamer.

     

    Just thoughts.

  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 6,855

    I am of the opinion that there is just as much, if not more, "good stuff" available today as there was 1/5/10/20 years ago.

    It's just that there has been an exponentially larger amount of crap to wade through to find it.

    I mean, back in 1985 - there was... Carmen Sandiego, Oregon Trail Jet Set Willy, and Starquake. And that was about it for new releases. The market was small, it didn't take much to saturate it. I loved Carmen Sandiego and Oregon Trail when I was in elementary school...

    The market is a lot larger now. There are still good games out there, but they get drowned out by a lot of marketing and lose shelf space to games that can afford it - not that necessarily deserve it. It's similar to Hollywood: there are still good movies that get made, they just aren't necessarily the ones that get TV ads and movie trailers plastered everywhere.

    So don't be afraid to try out off the wall or smaller games. It doesn't need to have a multi-million dollar budget to be fun (after all, Carmen Sandiego certainly didn't), it doesn't need state of the art graphics to be fun, it doesn't even need good reviews by critics: it just needs to be fun to you. There are literally hundreds of MMO titles out there, a lot of them niche titles that cater to specific interests. There is something out there for just about everyone; it's just a matter of finding it. Don't be afraid to go beyond your comfort zone: I know a lot of people that will just dismiss a game outright because of F2P, genre, titles without free trials or demos, poor/older graphics, etc... you may be dismissing an ideal game.

    When you find something you like, make sure you support it - not only by buying it (although money certainly helps), but by playing it, being active in forums for it, by talking about it, and promoting it. Become a part of the community within it. Not all developers take notice, but for a lot of smaller and indie devs this is what they are really after; the satisfaction of knowing that someone out there appreciates their baby. It doesn't take a lot of players to keep a game alive, it just takes passionate players.

  • J2KhouriJ2Khouri Member UncommonPosts: 31

    Originally posted by Ridelynn

    I am of the opinion that there is just as much, if not more, "good stuff" available today as there was 1/5/10/20 years ago.

    It's just that there has been an exponentially larger amount of crap to wade through to find it.

    I mean, back in 1985 - there was... Carmen Sandiego, Oregon Trail Jet Set Willy, and Starquake. And that was about it for new releases. The market was small, it didn't take much to saturate it. I loved Carmen Sandiego and Oregon Trail when I was in elementary school...

    The market is a lot larger now. There are still good games out there, but they get drowned out by a lot of marketing and lose shelf space to games that can afford it - not that necessarily deserve it. It's similar to Hollywood: there are still good movies that get made, they just aren't necessarily the ones that get TV ads and movie trailers plastered everywhere.

    So don't be afraid to try out off the wall or smaller games. It doesn't need to have a multi-million dollar budget to be fun (after all, Carmen Sandiego certainly didn't), it doesn't need state of the art graphics to be fun, it doesn't even need good reviews by critics: it just needs to be fun to you. There are literally hundreds of MMO titles out there, a lot of them niche titles that cater to specific interests. There is something out there for just about everyone; it's just a matter of finding it. Don't be afraid to go beyond your comfort zone: I know a lot of people that will just dismiss a game outright because of F2P, genre, titles without free trials or demos, poor/older graphics, etc... you may be dismissing an ideal game.

    When you find something you like, make sure you support it - not only by buying it (although money certainly helps), but by playing it, being active in forums for it, by talking about it, and promoting it. Become a part of the community within it. Not all developers take notice, but for a lot of smaller and indie devs this is what they are really after; the satisfaction of knowing that someone out there appreciates their baby. It doesn't take a lot of players to keep a game alive, it just takes passionate players.

    no u!

  • WhiteLanternWhiteLantern Member RarePosts: 2,974

    Originally posted by Ridelynn

    I am of the opinion that there is just as much, if not more, "good stuff" available today as there was 1/5/10/20 years ago.

    It's just that there has been an exponentially larger amount of crap to wade through to find it.

    I mean, back in 1985 - there was... Carmen Sandiego, Oregon Trail Jet Set Willy, and Starquake. And that was about it for new releases. The market was small, it didn't take much to saturate it. I loved Carmen Sandiego and Oregon Trail when I was in elementary school...

    The market is a lot larger now. There are still good games out there, but they get drowned out by a lot of marketing and lose shelf space to games that can afford it - not that necessarily deserve it. It's similar to Hollywood: there are still good movies that get made, they just aren't necessarily the ones that get TV ads and movie trailers plastered everywhere.

    So don't be afraid to try out off the wall or smaller games. It doesn't need to have a multi-million dollar budget to be fun (after all, Carmen Sandiego certainly didn't), it doesn't need state of the art graphics to be fun, it doesn't even need good reviews by critics: it just needs to be fun to you. There are literally hundreds of MMO titles out there, a lot of them niche titles that cater to specific interests. There is something out there for just about everyone; it's just a matter of finding it. Don't be afraid to go beyond your comfort zone: I know a lot of people that will just dismiss a game outright because of F2P, genre, titles without free trials or demos, poor/older graphics, etc... you may be dismissing an ideal game.

    When you find something you like, make sure you support it - not only by buying it (although money certainly helps), but by playing it, being active in forums for it, by talking about it, and promoting it. Become a part of the community within it. Not all developers take notice, but for a lot of smaller and indie devs this is what they are really after; the satisfaction of knowing that someone out there appreciates their baby. It doesn't take a lot of players to keep a game alive, it just takes passionate players.

    Believe me, there was plenty of crap back then too. The OP's glasses, they are rose-colorred.

    Remember the days of PCGamer's demo disks packed into each issue? They were there to help you wade through the crap.

    Now we have betas for that. image

    I want a mmorpg where people have gone through misery, have gone through school stuff and actually have had sex even. -sagil

  • WaldoCornWaldoCorn Member UncommonPosts: 235

    Originally posted by J2Khouri

    Originally posted by WaldoCorn

    I think, that in the early days of gaming, many of those who created games, where creative people, who found game creation, the right outlet for their creativity. They did what they did, almost as an art form, on shoestring budgets, never dreaming of riches, and were doing the work, from passion.

    With the financial success of WoW, primarily, numbers became the focus, granted it took a few years for that to sink in. This I believe changed the focus, from passion, to yield. Rather than people doing the work from passion, they did it with hopes of riches.

    Not that there arent passionate creative teams, but rather, they are neutered  by the bottom line, and waves of worker bee's who have never had an orginal thought.

    This leaves the players, the most important factor of any game, un enthused, and well aware of the fact, they aren't playing, "their game," any more, but rather, being allowed to play someone elses, financial tool.

     

    Uh... d...damn dude. You just depressed me for the whole night, thanks a lot.

    Well the good news, in my theory, is that with the 08 financial crisis, and the economy going down the tubes, game company's now have to really get creative, theres that word again, and work harder for their money.

    I saw some numbers somewhere, that 2011 gamming revenues were through the roof.

    Is that a reflection of a bigger group of gamers than ever before? More new gamers, catching the rush?

    Maybe those of us who have gamed for a while need to take a break (speaking of myself here) come back and see.

    Perhaps it was , MY perceptions, of gaming that were un reallistic, or at the very least, different now .

    Change being the one constant in the universe, perhaps it's me, us, after all.

    Then again it might have been LOTROL. lol

    See the world and all within it.
    Live a lifetime in every minute.

  • KhaerosKhaeros Member Posts: 452

    Are you really looking for a game?

  • DjildjameshDjildjamesh Member UncommonPosts: 406

    Originally posted by WhiteLantern

    Originally posted by Ridelynn

    I am of the opinion that there is just as much, if not more, "good stuff" available today as there was 1/5/10/20 years ago.

    It's just that there has been an exponentially larger amount of crap to wade through to find it.

    I mean, back in 1985 - there was... Carmen Sandiego, Oregon Trail Jet Set Willy, and Starquake. And that was about it for new releases. The market was small, it didn't take much to saturate it. I loved Carmen Sandiego and Oregon Trail when I was in elementary school...

    The market is a lot larger now. There are still good games out there, but they get drowned out by a lot of marketing and lose shelf space to games that can afford it - not that necessarily deserve it. It's similar to Hollywood: there are still good movies that get made, they just aren't necessarily the ones that get TV ads and movie trailers plastered everywhere.

    So don't be afraid to try out off the wall or smaller games. It doesn't need to have a multi-million dollar budget to be fun (after all, Carmen Sandiego certainly didn't), it doesn't need state of the art graphics to be fun, it doesn't even need good reviews by critics: it just needs to be fun to you. There are literally hundreds of MMO titles out there, a lot of them niche titles that cater to specific interests. There is something out there for just about everyone; it's just a matter of finding it. Don't be afraid to go beyond your comfort zone: I know a lot of people that will just dismiss a game outright because of F2P, genre, titles without free trials or demos, poor/older graphics, etc... you may be dismissing an ideal game.

    When you find something you like, make sure you support it - not only by buying it (although money certainly helps), but by playing it, being active in forums for it, by talking about it, and promoting it. Become a part of the community within it. Not all developers take notice, but for a lot of smaller and indie devs this is what they are really after; the satisfaction of knowing that someone out there appreciates their baby. It doesn't take a lot of players to keep a game alive, it just takes passionate players.

    Believe me, there was plenty of crap back then too. The OP's glasses, they are rose-colorred.

    Remember the days of PCGamer's demo disks packed into each issue? They were there to help you wade through the crap.

    Now we have betas for that. image

    Beta's are not free game demo's dude :(

  • GeeTeeEffOhGeeTeeEffOh Member Posts: 731

    Originally posted by Djildjamesh

    Originally posted by WhiteLantern


    Originally posted by Ridelynn

    I am of the opinion that there is just as much, if not more, "good stuff" available today as there was 1/5/10/20 years ago.

    It's just that there has been an exponentially larger amount of crap to wade through to find it.

    I mean, back in 1985 - there was... Carmen Sandiego, Oregon Trail Jet Set Willy, and Starquake. And that was about it for new releases. The market was small, it didn't take much to saturate it. I loved Carmen Sandiego and Oregon Trail when I was in elementary school...

    The market is a lot larger now. There are still good games out there, but they get drowned out by a lot of marketing and lose shelf space to games that can afford it - not that necessarily deserve it. It's similar to Hollywood: there are still good movies that get made, they just aren't necessarily the ones that get TV ads and movie trailers plastered everywhere.

    So don't be afraid to try out off the wall or smaller games. It doesn't need to have a multi-million dollar budget to be fun (after all, Carmen Sandiego certainly didn't), it doesn't need state of the art graphics to be fun, it doesn't even need good reviews by critics: it just needs to be fun to you. There are literally hundreds of MMO titles out there, a lot of them niche titles that cater to specific interests. There is something out there for just about everyone; it's just a matter of finding it. Don't be afraid to go beyond your comfort zone: I know a lot of people that will just dismiss a game outright because of F2P, genre, titles without free trials or demos, poor/older graphics, etc... you may be dismissing an ideal game.

    When you find something you like, make sure you support it - not only by buying it (although money certainly helps), but by playing it, being active in forums for it, by talking about it, and promoting it. Become a part of the community within it. Not all developers take notice, but for a lot of smaller and indie devs this is what they are really after; the satisfaction of knowing that someone out there appreciates their baby. It doesn't take a lot of players to keep a game alive, it just takes passionate players.

    Believe me, there was plenty of crap back then too. The OP's glasses, they are rose-colorred.

    Remember the days of PCGamer's demo disks packed into each issue? They were there to help you wade through the crap.

    Now we have betas for that. image

    Beta's are not free game demo's dude :(

    Yeah, 1st you have to go to the store and purchase the boxed edition within the 1st few weeks of release. Then you have to come home and plunk your credit card down on the company's website. Only THEN, are you allowed to beta test.

  • kastakasta Member Posts: 512

    Originally posted by Djildjamesh

    Originally posted by WhiteLantern


    Originally posted by Ridelynn

    I am of the opinion that there is just as much, if not more, "good stuff" available today as there was 1/5/10/20 years ago.

    It's just that there has been an exponentially larger amount of crap to wade through to find it.

    I mean, back in 1985 - there was... Carmen Sandiego, Oregon Trail Jet Set Willy, and Starquake. And that was about it for new releases. The market was small, it didn't take much to saturate it. I loved Carmen Sandiego and Oregon Trail when I was in elementary school...

    The market is a lot larger now. There are still good games out there, but they get drowned out by a lot of marketing and lose shelf space to games that can afford it - not that necessarily deserve it. It's similar to Hollywood: there are still good movies that get made, they just aren't necessarily the ones that get TV ads and movie trailers plastered everywhere.

    So don't be afraid to try out off the wall or smaller games. It doesn't need to have a multi-million dollar budget to be fun (after all, Carmen Sandiego certainly didn't), it doesn't need state of the art graphics to be fun, it doesn't even need good reviews by critics: it just needs to be fun to you. There are literally hundreds of MMO titles out there, a lot of them niche titles that cater to specific interests. There is something out there for just about everyone; it's just a matter of finding it. Don't be afraid to go beyond your comfort zone: I know a lot of people that will just dismiss a game outright because of F2P, genre, titles without free trials or demos, poor/older graphics, etc... you may be dismissing an ideal game.

    When you find something you like, make sure you support it - not only by buying it (although money certainly helps), but by playing it, being active in forums for it, by talking about it, and promoting it. Become a part of the community within it. Not all developers take notice, but for a lot of smaller and indie devs this is what they are really after; the satisfaction of knowing that someone out there appreciates their baby. It doesn't take a lot of players to keep a game alive, it just takes passionate players.

    Believe me, there was plenty of crap back then too. The OP's glasses, they are rose-colorred.

    Remember the days of PCGamer's demo disks packed into each issue? They were there to help you wade through the crap.

    Now we have betas for that. image

    Beta's are not free game demo's dude :(

    Yes, they are now.  The only thing that the companies are 'testing' is their ability to get your money.

  • SignusMSignusM Member Posts: 2,225

    Originally posted by Ridelynn

    I am of the opinion that there is just as much, if not more, "good stuff" available today as there was 1/5/10/20 years ago.

    It's just that there has been an exponentially larger amount of crap to wade through to find it.

    I mean, back in 1985 - there was... Carmen Sandiego, Oregon Trail Jet Set Willy, and Starquake. And that was about it for new releases. The market was small, it didn't take much to saturate it. I loved Carmen Sandiego and Oregon Trail when I was in elementary school...

    Er.. what warped version of the 80s did you live in? That's not even remotely true. The Ultima Games? The text adventures? The Goldbox games? The MUDs?

    The difference is, the "good stuff" of this generation is usually not nearly as well made as the "good stuff" of the old generations.

  • EduardoASGEduardoASG Member Posts: 832

    the reason for todays crap is, in my opinion, simple: ---> 3D

    before the dx 3d the creative people could produce art in a computer.. could make a game from start to finnish wihtout the need for big teams or big budgets.

    you had an idea, you implemented it. You had a dream, the dream was shared in digital bytes. and people love to dream, so the players got immersed in someone elses dream and rejoiced.

    today is diferent. You need a team for making the graphics, another to make the scripts to animate those graphics, another for this another for that.. its a total mess. The creative element is almost gone, burried under the weight of marketing and cash. Ironically, that will lead to the end of this industry.. since players will gradually stop buying and move to other forms of entretainment.

    is there a light at the end of the tunnel? Sure is.. games beeing produced by smal companies ( the ones we call independent ) sometimes can surprise you.

    Games like Starfarer bringing back good memories from when games were fun and addictive.. simple jewels here and there.

    New game engines beeing made to help the creatives to code their dreams in the 21 st century, like Gamemaker, like scratch/ByoB/Panther projets bringing the production of digital dreams to the masses, calling the creator back into the dream production.

    Those engines will bring back good software in the long run, far away from the greedy corps selling 3d rendered sceneries full of flashy lights and weird effects but void of content.

    there is hope.

    the other issue with 3d is hardware:

    Before the dx 3d era you didnt need to have an expensive rig to run games, you didnt have to worry about drivers for graphics cards, and all the costs associated with upgrading and maintainning hardware that could run your games properly. Now you do.. and that is a big issue too.

    Aion, AoC, AC, AO, DDO, Eve, Eq2, GW, MW3, L1&2, RF, RIFT, SWG, SWTOR, TR, UO, WOW, WAR
  • WhiteLanternWhiteLantern Member RarePosts: 2,974

    Originally posted by Djildjamesh

    Originally posted by WhiteLantern


    Originally posted by Ridelynn

    I am of the opinion that there is just as much, if not more, "good stuff" available today as there was 1/5/10/20 years ago.

    It's just that there has been an exponentially larger amount of crap to wade through to find it.

    I mean, back in 1985 - there was... Carmen Sandiego, Oregon Trail Jet Set Willy, and Starquake. And that was about it for new releases. The market was small, it didn't take much to saturate it. I loved Carmen Sandiego and Oregon Trail when I was in elementary school...

    The market is a lot larger now. There are still good games out there, but they get drowned out by a lot of marketing and lose shelf space to games that can afford it - not that necessarily deserve it. It's similar to Hollywood: there are still good movies that get made, they just aren't necessarily the ones that get TV ads and movie trailers plastered everywhere.

    So don't be afraid to try out off the wall or smaller games. It doesn't need to have a multi-million dollar budget to be fun (after all, Carmen Sandiego certainly didn't), it doesn't need state of the art graphics to be fun, it doesn't even need good reviews by critics: it just needs to be fun to you. There are literally hundreds of MMO titles out there, a lot of them niche titles that cater to specific interests. There is something out there for just about everyone; it's just a matter of finding it. Don't be afraid to go beyond your comfort zone: I know a lot of people that will just dismiss a game outright because of F2P, genre, titles without free trials or demos, poor/older graphics, etc... you may be dismissing an ideal game.

    When you find something you like, make sure you support it - not only by buying it (although money certainly helps), but by playing it, being active in forums for it, by talking about it, and promoting it. Become a part of the community within it. Not all developers take notice, but for a lot of smaller and indie devs this is what they are really after; the satisfaction of knowing that someone out there appreciates their baby. It doesn't take a lot of players to keep a game alive, it just takes passionate players.

    Believe me, there was plenty of crap back then too. The OP's glasses, they are rose-colorred.

    Remember the days of PCGamer's demo disks packed into each issue? They were there to help you wade through the crap.

    Now we have betas for that. image

    Beta's are not free game demo's dude :(

    Your sarcasm detector is not turned up high enough.

    I want a mmorpg where people have gone through misery, have gone through school stuff and actually have had sex even. -sagil

  • WaldoCornWaldoCorn Member UncommonPosts: 235

    Originally posted by EduardoASG

    the reason for todays crap is, in my opinion, simple: ---> 3D

    before the dx 3d the creative people could produce art in a computer.. could make a game from start to finnish wihtout the need for big teams or big budgets.

    you had an idea, you implemented it. You had a dream, the dream was shared in digital bytes. and people love to dream, so the players got immersed in someone elses dream and rejoiced.

    today is diferent. You need a team for making the graphics, another to make the scripts to animate those graphics, another for this another for that.. its a total mess. The creative element is almost gone, burried under the weight of marketing and cash. Ironically, that will lead to the end of this industry.. since players will gradually stop buying and move to other forms of entretainment.

    is there a light at the end of the tunnel? Sure is.. games beeing produced by smal companies ( the ones we call independent ) sometimes can surprise you.

    Games like Starfarer bringing back good memories from when games were fun and addictive.. simple jewels here and there.

    New game engines beeing made to help the creatives to code their dreams in the 21 st century, like Gamemaker, like scratch/ByoB/Panther projets bringing the production of digital dreams to the masses, calling the creator back into the dream production.

    Those engines will bring back good software in the long run, far away from the greedy corps selling 3d rendered sceneries full of flashy lights and weird effects but void of content.

    there is hope.

    the other issue with 3d is hardware:

    Before the dx 3d era you didnt need to have an expensive rig to run games, you didnt have to worry about drivers for graphics cards, and all the costs associated with upgrading and maintainning hardware that could run your games properly. Now you do.. and that is a big issue too.

    Yeah man this.

    If bf 1942 and the mods, was still as active as it was even a couple years ago, thats all I'd need. Indeed it was, "My Game," basically, until the pop died during the game spy/punk buster, snafu.

    Ive no love for GS or PB, but the dropped support and the the GS move hurt the population so much, just couldn't find much action. And Bad Company2 release happened around that time also.

    Granted it's a mmo pvp shooter, with no rpg to it, but I loved it like no other.

    See the world and all within it.
    Live a lifetime in every minute.

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,262

    Originally posted by WhiteLantern

    Believe me, there was plenty of crap back then too. The OP's glasses, they are rose-colorred.

    Remember the days of PCGamer's demo disks packed into each issue? They were there to help you wade through the crap.

    Now we have betas for that. image

    I don't care how many bad games launch in a given year.  Just how many good ones that I like.

  • It's all about the bottom line, accountants love predictability.

    MMOs are just going through what all other entertainment goes through - first there is a cycle of creativity followed by a cycle of sequels and formulas (basically exact same plot/mechanics as something popular with the names changed).  It's happened with movies, books, music, single player games and now with MMOs.

    Just look at the solo game market right now - it's been swamped with casual/social stuff.

    As far as good MMOs to play - are you just bored with same old mechanics?  Or do you need a new world to explore?  If you're bored with same old mechanics your best bet is probably to jump into one of the much older games or one of the indie games.  There again in both cases their games will suffer in the looks department.  If you want a new world to explore jump into EQ2, LOTRO, WOW, SWTOR, Lineage 2, Rift or any other MMO out in last 5 years that you haven't played.  Mechanics are very similar but each of these games have their own lore, different landscapes, different art styles, etc.

  • SlukjanSlukjan Member UncommonPosts: 265

    Originally posted by SignusM

    Originally posted by Ridelynn

    I am of the opinion that there is just as much, if not more, "good stuff" available today as there was 1/5/10/20 years ago.

    It's just that there has been an exponentially larger amount of crap to wade through to find it.

    I mean, back in 1985 - there was... Carmen Sandiego, Oregon Trail Jet Set Willy, and Starquake. And that was about it for new releases. The market was small, it didn't take much to saturate it. I loved Carmen Sandiego and Oregon Trail when I was in elementary school...

    Er.. what warped version of the 80s did you live in? That's not even remotely true. The Ultima Games? The text adventures? The Goldbox games? The MUDs?

    The difference is, the "good stuff" of this generation is usually not nearly as well made as the "good stuff" of the old generations.

    What about the Quest for Glory series by Sierra?  I remember those being quite fun back in the early 90s.

  • hurriedcorgihurriedcorgi Member Posts: 16
    I personally just don't feel the excitement and reward I used to get from games (mmo's in particular)... I still play FiranMUX speaking of MUDs. The mmo's out not just feel hollow to me - like why am I even playing this?

    Lots of people tend to just answer that it is my fault and I should just quit looking but I don't feel like it was me that left the genre but more the genre that left me so I just keep looking and hoping something will come a long for me I guess...
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