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should i upgrade to a 460

sidfusidfu Member Posts: 170

right now im using a geforce 275 gtx i can get a geforce 460 gtx for a good price should i get it.

 

the 275 has higher polygon fill rate but the 460 has more cores and is faster

Comments

  • YalexyYalexy Member UncommonPosts: 1,058

    Depends on what you call a good price. If you can get a GTX460 1GB for some $100 or less then yes, I'd say it's worth it. The GTX460 is about 20-25% faster then the GTX275 if we go by the benchmarks and it's more silent aswell.

  • GezusGezus Member Posts: 10

    I bought a MSI GeForce GTX 460 Fermi Hawk OC 780MHZ 1GB GDDR5 Dual DVI Mini-HDMI DX11 PCI-E Video Card and I have a ton of friends with random 560's that are jealous of my card, it runs almost silent, cooler than 90% of the other cards out there, and laughs at almost ever game I throw at it. 

    I have a pretty sweet build atm, built around 4 months ago with a AMD Phenom II X6 1100T Black Edition, 8 gigs of ram, and that video card. and I can play the Witcher 2 on max settings VERY easily. and the Witcher 2 eats PC's for breakfast. 

     

    http://ncix.com/products/?sku=55409&vpn=N460GTX HAWK&manufacture=MSI/MicroStar

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 23,288

    What is a "good price" on a GTX 460?

    A GeForce GTX 460 1 GB will tend to be a little faster than a GeForce GTX 275.  But only a little, and we're talking about something like 10% here.  That's not enough to justify the upgrade unless you're getting the GTX 460 dirt cheap or really need DirectX 11 support.  A 768 MB or SE version won't be an upgrade at all.

  • GezusGezus Member Posts: 10

    Originally posted by Quizzical

    What is a "good price" on a GTX 460?

    A GeForce GTX 460 1 GB will tend to be a little faster than a GeForce GTX 275.  But only a little, and we're talking about something like 10% here.  That's not enough to justify the upgrade unless you're getting the GTX 460 dirt cheap or really need DirectX 11 support.  A 768 MB or SE version won't be an upgrade at all.

    I paid $110 for mine on special at NCIX. and it's Factory OC'd 

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 23,288

    The reason I had to ask what a "good price" is is that sometimes someone will see a $150 card available for $200, but claimed to be on sale from the "normal" price of $300, and think that's a good price.

    $110 for that card is a good price, though.  But I don't think it's worth $110 for a small increase in performance.  Usually if you're going to replace an old card by a new one, you want something that is a lot faster, not just al iittle bit faster.

    I don't see any reason why someone with a GTX 560 would be jealous of a GTX 460.  The former is basically a higher clocked version of the latter, though it's technically also a new stepping.  And even the GTX 560 itself is a cut down GeForce GTX 560 Ti, which is what people usually mean by a GTX 560.  So no, they're not jealous of your card's performance, though they might be jealous of the temperatures and noise level.

  • sidfusidfu Member Posts: 170

    i can get the 768 meg gtx 460 for 110$ and the 1gig gtx 460 se for 120$.

     

    so do u think it would be a worthwhile upgrade from a gtx 275

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 23,288

    Those won't perform any better than what you already have,  They won't be upgrades at all, let alone worthwhile.  Well, I guess you'd see the same performance with a little lower power consumption, and also DirectX 11 support, but that would be all that you gain.

  • nomssnomss Member UncommonPosts: 1,468
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 23,288

    Originally posted by nomss

    480

    The GeForce GTX 480 was a bad card, and doesn't make sense to buy new.  If that's the level of performance you want, then look into a GeForce GTX 570 or a Radeon HD 6970.

  • treyu86treyu86 Member UncommonPosts: 261

    I have a gtx 285 1Gb and was wondering the same, if getting a new card or not( a 460 or something like that, maybe a bit higher but I reas 560 are expensive now). Reading the answers here makes me doubt about it, I don't know if the investment will be worth it if I am going to get little performance improvements (if with a 275 you get less than 10% with a 460, mine will get less I suppose).

     

    : s ?

  • mrw0lfmrw0lf Member Posts: 2,269

    Originally posted by Quizzical

    Originally posted by nomss

    480

    The GeForce GTX 480 was a bad card, and doesn't make sense to buy new.  If that's the level of performance you want, then look into a GeForce GTX 570 or a Radeon HD 6970.

    Sorry for the slight ot but I have an asus gtx480 and I bow to your superior knowledge quiz, what made my card a bad buy? I have never had any problems with it and have been very happy with the performance.

    -----
    “The person who is certain, and who claims divine warrant for his certainty, belongs now to the infancy of our species.”

  • ShodanasShodanas Member RarePosts: 1,933

    I replaced my GTX 280 with an Asus GTX 460 and i am quite pleased. The 460 is faster, cooler, less noisy plus it has quite high o/c limits with temperatures still remaining low.

  • sidfusidfu Member Posts: 170

    guess ill just keep to my gtx 275 for now since looking on nvidia website the 275 can process 50billion polygons where the 460 can only do 35billion

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 23,288

    Originally posted by mrw0lf

    Originally posted by Quizzical


    Originally posted by nomss

    480

    The GeForce GTX 480 was a bad card, and doesn't make sense to buy new.  If that's the level of performance you want, then look into a GeForce GTX 570 or a Radeon HD 6970.

    Sorry for the slight ot but I have an asus gtx480 and I bow to your superior knowledge quiz, what made my card a bad buy? I have never had any problems with it and have been very happy with the performance.

    Too hot, too noisy, too power-hungry, too expensive, and not enough performance to justify those.  If you attach a second monitor, you end up with idle power consumption well over 100 W for just the video card, which is simply obscene.

    When the GeForce GTX 480 first launched, someone who cares about frame rates above all else could kind of justify one and put up with the heat, noise, power consumption, and price tag.  Today, you can get basically the same performance from a GeForce GTX 570 with much lower power consumption, much cooler temperatures, and much less noise.

    -------

    If you've got a GeForce GTX 285, then I see no need to upgrade it just yet, unless you're looking for DirectX 11 support.  For how much those cost new, you'd probably hope to keep it longer than just one generation of cards.  AMD actually intended to vacate the high end, apart from CrossFire, and is only competitive at the high end because Nvidia wasn't able to fill it, as the Fermi architecture was a disaster.

    Southern Islands and Kepler should launch around the end of this year, and then there will be some worthy upgrades out.  Southern Islands will be two full node die shrinks as compared to GT200b (and two and a half as compared to GT200), so that will offer room for huge performance improvements even without going with all that large of a die.  Southern Islands will basically be a die shrink of the Cayman GPU that you can get today, with some tweaks, and scaled up and down for various performance segments.

    I'm expecting Kepler to be a huge advance over Fermi, because it's much easier to improve on your last effort if your last effort was quite bad.  The reason why Conroe was so much better than Presler (and on the same process node!) isn't just that Conroe was good, but also that Presler was quite bad.

  • nomssnomss Member UncommonPosts: 1,468

    Originally posted by Quizzical

    Originally posted by mrw0lf


    Originally posted by Quizzical


    Originally posted by nomss

    480

    The GeForce GTX 480 was a bad card, and doesn't make sense to buy new.  If that's the level of performance you want, then look into a GeForce GTX 570 or a Radeon HD 6970.

    Sorry for the slight ot but I have an asus gtx480 and I bow to your superior knowledge quiz, what made my card a bad buy? I have never had any problems with it and have been very happy with the performance.

    Too hot, too noisy, too power-hungry, too expensive, and not enough performance to justify those.  If you attach a second monitor, you end up with idle power consumption well over 100 W for just the video card, which is simply obscene.

    When the GeForce GTX 480 first launched, someone who cares about frame rates above all else could kind of justify one and put up with the heat, noise, power consumption, and price tag.  Today, you can get basically the same performance from a GeForce GTX 570 with much lower power consumption, much cooler temperatures, and much less noise.

    -------

    If you've got a GeForce GTX 285, then I see no need to upgrade it just yet, unless you're looking for DirectX 11 support.  For how much those cost new, you'd probably hope to keep it longer than just one generation of cards.  AMD actually intended to vacate the high end, apart from CrossFire, and is only competitive at the high end because Nvidia wasn't able to fill it, as the Fermi architecture was a disaster.

    Southern Islands and Kepler should launch around the end of this year, and then there will be some worthy upgrades out.  Southern Islands will be two full node die shrinks as compared to GT200b (and two and a half as compared to GT200), so that will offer room for huge performance improvements even without going with all that large of a die.  Southern Islands will basically be a die shrink of the Cayman GPU that you can get today, with some tweaks, and scaled up and down for various performance segments.

    I'm expecting Kepler to be a huge advance over Fermi, because it's much easier to improve on your last effort if your last effort was quite bad.  The reason why Conroe was so much better than Presler (and on the same process node!) isn't just that Conroe was good, but also that Presler was quite bad.

    Um... no. I can not hear a thing out of my computer. IDK what temp it's running at. As for being too power hungry, shouldn't matter?

    I have not tried another card so IDK.

  • AntariousAntarious Member UncommonPosts: 2,820

    Originally posted by nomss

    Originally posted by Quizzical


    Originally posted by mrw0lf


    Originally posted by Quizzical


    Originally posted by nomss

    480

    The GeForce GTX 480 was a bad card, and doesn't make sense to buy new.  If that's the level of performance you want, then look into a GeForce GTX 570 or a Radeon HD 6970.

    Sorry for the slight ot but I have an asus gtx480 and I bow to your superior knowledge quiz, what made my card a bad buy? I have never had any problems with it and have been very happy with the performance.

    Too hot, too noisy, too power-hungry, too expensive, and not enough performance to justify those.  If you attach a second monitor, you end up with idle power consumption well over 100 W for just the video card, which is simply obscene.

    When the GeForce GTX 480 first launched, someone who cares about frame rates above all else could kind of justify one and put up with the heat, noise, power consumption, and price tag.  Today, you can get basically the same performance from a GeForce GTX 570 with much lower power consumption, much cooler temperatures, and much less noise.

    -------

    If you've got a GeForce GTX 285, then I see no need to upgrade it just yet, unless you're looking for DirectX 11 support.  For how much those cost new, you'd probably hope to keep it longer than just one generation of cards.  AMD actually intended to vacate the high end, apart from CrossFire, and is only competitive at the high end because Nvidia wasn't able to fill it, as the Fermi architecture was a disaster.

    Southern Islands and Kepler should launch around the end of this year, and then there will be some worthy upgrades out.  Southern Islands will be two full node die shrinks as compared to GT200b (and two and a half as compared to GT200), so that will offer room for huge performance improvements even without going with all that large of a die.  Southern Islands will basically be a die shrink of the Cayman GPU that you can get today, with some tweaks, and scaled up and down for various performance segments.

    I'm expecting Kepler to be a huge advance over Fermi, because it's much easier to improve on your last effort if your last effort was quite bad.  The reason why Conroe was so much better than Presler (and on the same process node!) isn't just that Conroe was good, but also that Presler was quite bad.

    Um... no. I can not hear a thing out of my computer. IDK what temp it's running at. As for being too power hungry, shouldn't matter?

    I have not tried another card so IDK.

     

    I guess I would say because if I was going to buy a video card right now I don't know why I would buy a 480.    The 480 costs relatively the same as both of the cards the other poster replied to you about.   Power, heat.. noise etc are simply other advantages of the newer cards.   It doesn't make what you have bad.. its just relative to if you were going to buy right now..

     

    If the 480 was a lot cheaper then.. sure.

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 23,288

    Originally posted by nomss

    Originally posted by Quizzical

    Too hot, too noisy, too power-hungry, too expensive, and not enough performance to justify those.  If you attach a second monitor, you end up with idle power consumption well over 100 W for just the video card, which is simply obscene.

    When the GeForce GTX 480 first launched, someone who cares about frame rates above all else could kind of justify one and put up with the heat, noise, power consumption, and price tag.  Today, you can get basically the same performance from a GeForce GTX 570 with much lower power consumption, much cooler temperatures, and much less noise.

    Um... no. I can not hear a thing out of my computer. IDK what temp it's running at. As for being too power hungry, shouldn't matter?

    I have not tried another card so IDK.

    It might be that you've just never picked up a game that pushed the card very hard.  If the card has always been at least half idle, then it might well seem fine.

    The reference GeForce GTX 480 is probably the loudest single GPU reference card to launch in the last eight years.  Noise bothers some people more than others.  If you're of the view that no cards on the market are loud enough to be a problem, then you'll also conclude that the GTX 480 isn't, either.

    If temperatures are too high, then you don't necessarily notice until the card fries.  The reference GeForce GTX 470 and 480 run much hotter than any other reference cards at stock speeds on TSMC's 40 nm bulk silicon process--and that process node doesn't handle high temperatures as well as some older ones.  It is highly probable that the cards will have much higher than normal failure rates, though we don't really know, as data on that is hard to come by.

    As for power hungry, it's a question of how high of an electricity bill you want, and hot you want your room to be, and how much airflow you need to get for your case.  For a given level of performance, less power is always better than more power consumption.  It's only a question of how much better, and to some desktop users, the answer is, not that much.

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