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Will this 600w PS run my new system?

djnexusdjnexus Member Posts: 677

Greetings, I just ordered and put together a new system but currently waiting on a new power supply because it was DOA. What I was wandering is could this 600 watt power supply that I ordered run this system. Also if a motherboard supports PCI-E 2.0 and I get a video card thats 2.1 PCI-E will it still work and be compatible with the MB? Thanks

Athlon II X3 445 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103872

Hex Xpower Pro 600 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817339025

MSI 880GM-E41 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813130295

Western Digital Caviar 500GB HD http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136358

Gskill 4gigs ddr3 1600 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231193

Sapphire Radeon HD 5830 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102878

Comments

  • ShinamiShinami Member UncommonPosts: 825

    Hello,

     

    According to the specifications on the newegg site you have Two Rails which are 12v which add up to 52A. 52A x 12v = 624W. 3.3v @ 24A = 79.2W, 5v x 15A = 75w. You wont have 100% draw and it claims to have 600W continous,  Please read below. Its a long read, but I was thinking of your post.

     

    Your Radeon HD5830 has two 6 Pin Power Connectors. I will define below what that means. First FORGET everything you know about the "power consumption" battles between Nvidia and ATI for a second and judge by PURE ELECTRONICS only.

     

    When a video card is placed on a motherboard, the PCI-Express slot can supply 75W on power to the card. However, cards consume more power than the PCI-Express can draw from the supply, so PEG connectors are included on the card. These are these BLACK connectors which are either 6 PIN or 8 PIN. 6-PEG Pins draw 75W, 8-PEG Pin can draw on 150w as a maximum. Your card has two 75w Connectors. This means at full load your power consumption is between 150 - 225w on that card itself (by the electronics) and you have some good headroom to overclock. They wouldn't put a second connector on the card itself if One PEG + PCI EXPRESS slot draw weren't maxed out. The Second 6 PIN PEG really is for Maximum or heavy load Draws, like when playing Crysis or some SUPER HEAVY GAME out there that maxes out that card.

     

    Your processor will use 95W at full load. We are talking about 320W of power between processor using "maximum" Load. Basically the card won't use 225w of power, but by electronics I am just factoring in the maximum possible current draw by the onboard electronics and connects to be simple. This is assumed that system is at 100% load on stock settings.

     

    Adding in your motherboard and memory is another 50 - 60W...Lets use 60W. So now we are up to 380W. Add your hard drive in and we can reach around 400W. Please be advised this is your consumption at 100% load on everything (which you WILL not see)....However, If you PLAN on OVERCLOCKING, your processor easilly will go from 95W to 140 - 150W (I've overclocked many things before) and that video card will reach the 200W - 225W threshhold.

     

    The power supply reads "84% Efficiency" as a maximum. This is on regular draw, but efficiency is measured by Voltage and it tends to be averaged out...chances are your efficiency is around 80%. It sound like nothing, but if we apply mathematics, we know that 80% itself is the same as saying Four-Fifths. ^_^ 4/5. This means if you need to draw 400w of power, the power supply will consume 500W, and burn 100W as heat upon the supply itself. Its not 100% efficient ^^ Hell, nothing ever is! Don't forget optical drives and sound card! ^_^

     

    The supply is Good if and only if you do not plan to overclock anything on that system AND if you are not planning on doing heavy upgrades in the future. I do not trust that supply on running a 5830 Crossfire. Doing (150 + 150 + 95 + 50 + 30 + 20) = 495w (if its 100% efficient), lets factor an 80% efficiency. 495/.8 = 618.75 mostly on the 12v rail and since you don't have 100% integrity or efficiency on the actual rail itself, we are talking about blowing out the supply before entering FULL LOAD which easilly will raise both cards from 150 to around 180 - 200w each...

     

    If you want a system without heavy upgrades, sure that supply can work well...But if you plan on upgrading processors, video cards or even running crossfire...I higher rated supply will work better and actually have LESS wear on the 12v line. In fact it can help in making things future-proof too. $40 is great for the supply and it has a high efficiency rating too.

     

     

     

  • CatamountCatamount Member Posts: 773

    Everything Shinami has said is completely spot on, and I agree with his conclusion (kind of hard to argue with simple math :P).

    While you won't ever have every component simultaneously under 100% load, unless of course you decide to run Prime95, Furmark, and SiSSandra memory tests, while transfering 50GB of files around on your HDD, 600W is still a little closer than I'd cut it for a system like this.

    Unfotunately, $40-$50 is just not going to cut it for your PSU budget for this system, unless of course you wanted to give this one a try (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182173). In my experience, Rosewill has vastly cleaned up their act on power supplies, and doesn't sell the expensive paperweights they used to. Most of their PSUs are very well rated on Newegg these days. That said, that is not one of their higher end lines there (it says "value" for a reason), and I, myself, just wouldn't be inclined to trust a $40-$50 PSU at these levels of power unless it was simply on some kind of incredible sale (and that one's normally only $50).

    It's up to you. Personally, I'd go for something more along these lines (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182067), or more like this (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817152042). Really, you don't want to skimp on the PSU, ever. Get something with good continuous power, and

  • djnexusdjnexus Member Posts: 677

    Thanks for the input and explaining everything in detail. Im not getting the 5830 right away so ill go with the original power supply regardless for now. And maybe go with that Rosewill 700w later. And if im not mistaken I think newegg will only do a replacement on original PS I got.

  • ShinamiShinami Member UncommonPosts: 825

    Catamount is correct.

     

    The thing is that your PSU not only supplies power to all devices, It also regulates and protects them. A cheap PSU can have an Overvoltage Protection of +/- 10%. This is horrible in todays age because...voltage is variable, not static. It won't stay at 12v always. It will go up from 12.0 to 13.2v or fall to 10.8v.

     

    What this means is that sometimes your components will be operating at 10% higher voltage which is like having an Overclock, other times it will go below 12v causing instability due to components not getting enough current and juice. Its better to buy the higher power supplies simply because this wear is worse at large power loads, at around 25 - 50% power load, its fair...while 75% power load or higher means a lot of heat, and the greatest stress ever.

     

    The thing you wish to avoid is getting a cheap supply that while it may have a warranty and replacement plan, you don't want the supply to blow out and kill half your system or more. The reason that supply is so cheap is because newegg wants to get rid of them.

     

    One thing I do not do is buy modular power supplies. The thing is that when connecting the connectors...Its like connecting a line that can get frayed and the contacts can wear out over time. Non modular supplies are like this:

     

    (Rail) ---->Connector ---------------> Device

     

    Modular supplies are like this:

     

    PSU Int.---------------------------------------------------------PSU ext. ----- Case int.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------|

    (Rail) ---> Interior connector ---> interior Controller| <--Input---> <----Connector ---> Device

     ------------------------------------------------------------------|

    The thing is that, although they are popular and they don't fail as they used to...and modular supplies in this matter is all about Resistance....None of the specifications list or test this resistance for the public to see or read....so one never knows how good or bad the resistance really is in the inputs...as well as leakage (if any), which I feel that to play it safe, I prefer a direct line to the rail even though there will be cables all over the case.

     

    Edit: I wanted to simplify the drawing and be more detailed to clarify.

  • MehveMehve Member Posts: 487

    Originally posted by Shinami

    One thing I do not do is buy modular power supplies. The thing is that when connecting the connectors...Its like connecting a line that can get frayed and the contacts can wear out over time. Non modular supplies are like this:

    (Diagram)

    The thing is that, although they are popular and they don't fail as they used to...and modular supplies in this matter is all about Resistance....None of the specifications list or test this resistance for the public to see or read....so one never knows how good or bad the resistance really is in the inputs...as well as leakage (if any), which I feel that to play it safe, I prefer a direct line to the rail even though there will be cables all over the case.

     

    Edit: I wanted to simplify the drawing and be more detailed to clarify.

    Agreed on the first part, but not buying modular PSU's is a personal choice/preferance.

    Connector wear is pretty close to a complete non-issue, and is only going to arise from an obscene number of disconnect/reconnects. You're far more likey to see it on the cable->hardware end, which is an issue that modular/non-modular supplies see equally.

    Connection resistance is 1) negligible in the first place, which results in a negligible voltage drop across the connectors, and 2) what little there still is, is compensated for in a good PSU. As such, there really isn't a need to formalize and measure it the way other ATX/EPS electrical specs currently are. And really, if it was such a crucial issue, what about the connector resistance on the hardware end of things? That was around long before the modular ATX PSU ever showed up.

    Leakage? It's straight DC current so there won't be any fluctuating magnetic leakage, and direct metal-metal contact which means no arcing of any sort... Not quite sure what you're worried about there.

    A Modest Proposal for MMORPGs:
    That the means of progression would not be mutually exclusive from the means of enjoyment.

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