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PC Monitor VS TV Monitor

SinviperSinviper Member Posts: 169
Short and sweet.

My old monitor was giving me these really wierd faint horizontal lines in games.

Only in games. So I figured it was a videocard problem. Tried out my TV my screen and it's fine. My tv's bigger and it allows me to run at 1920x800.

Is there any problems I could run into such as wrong colours for photoshop or whatever?

Thanks in advanced, bye.

Originally posted by --Name edited out--


EX-PRO PLAYER IN WOW HERE.THIS GAME IS GOOD! TRUST ME IM USED TO BE THE BEST IN WOW BUT JUST A N00B IN AION. ITS CHALLENGEING , TRY IT!


[Sigh, watch out guys, this dude's pro.]

Comments

  • dfandfan Member Posts: 362

     For gaming, tvs suck ass thanks to huge input lag. Overall they are not very good for any computer use than movies thanks to huge pixel size.

  • thexratedthexrated Member UncommonPosts: 1,368

    With a good TV, the input lag is hardly noticiable. The problem I got with TVs is the 1920x1080 resolution. I prefer 1900x1200 for my computing needs.

    However, I do enjoy playing games with a large TV while, doing other stuff on my 28" monitor. Have to say Mass Effect 2 looked absolutely fantastic on my 46" TV.

    If you are looking to substitute your monitor to a LCD-TV, few tips:

    - Do not get over 32", the pixels get too big when looked from a typical viewing distance with the 1920*1080.

    - Get one with a good screen, not the cheapest option, but one with favorable reviews. There are many 32" LCD TVs that are suitable for gaming,

     

    "The person who experiences greatness must have a feeling for the myth he is in."

  • CleffyCleffy Member RarePosts: 6,254

    If you want accurate colors in Photoshop, you have to use an accurate monitor calibrater.  If you have one it should not matter if you are using a TV or a monitor, the calibrater should properly set the levels.  However for photoshop and digital work, it's prefered to use an IPS panel LED backlit LCD Monitor.  The reason being the picture quality is best, however they run up in the range of $1200.  The next best thing is a normal IPS Panel LCD Monitor, you can find some in the $150 range but usually over $300.  The difference between an LCD Monitor and a TV is the monitor has more pixels per inch, greater contrast ratio, and better response time.  Thats why the cost a premium to buy.

  • gatherisgatheris Member UncommonPosts: 1,016
    Originally posted by thexrated


    With a good TV, the input lag is hardly noticiable. The problem I got with TVs is the 1920x1080 resolution. I prefer 1900x1200 for my computing needs.
    However, I do enjoy playing games with a large TV while, doing other stuff on my 28" monitor. Have to say Mass Effect 2 looked absolutely fantastic on my 46" TV.
    If you are looking to substitute your monitor to a LCD-TV, few tips:
    - Do not get over 32", the pixels get too big when looked from a typical viewing distance with the 1920*1080.
    - Get one with a good screen, not the cheapest option, but one with favorable reviews. There are many 32" LCD TVs that are suitable for gaming,
     



     

    i use a 65" DLP and i don't have the pixel problem you write of  - - - only a problem with large LCD-TVs?  maybe the video card doesn't output to TV correctly?

    don't know but i couldn't be happier with my picture quality - - - 65" of gaming goodness - and don't forget that added bonus of the theatre surround the TV is hooked to

     

    funny thing when i had to go back to my 24" widescreen lcd while waiting for a replacement lamp that blew on the TV i actually felt claustrophobic

     

    image

  • thexratedthexrated Member UncommonPosts: 1,368
    Originally posted by gatheris

    Originally posted by thexrated


    With a good TV, the input lag is hardly noticiable. The problem I got with TVs is the 1920x1080 resolution. I prefer 1900x1200 for my computing needs.
    However, I do enjoy playing games with a large TV while, doing other stuff on my 28" monitor. Have to say Mass Effect 2 looked absolutely fantastic on my 46" TV.
    If you are looking to substitute your monitor to a LCD-TV, few tips:
    - Do not get over 32", the pixels get too big when looked from a typical viewing distance with the 1920*1080.
    - Get one with a good screen, not the cheapest option, but one with favorable reviews. There are many 32" LCD TVs that are suitable for gaming,
     



    i use a 65" DLP and i don't have the pixel problem you write of  - - - only a problem with large LCD-TVs?  maybe the video card doesn't output to TV correctly?

    don't know but i couldn't be happier with my picture quality - - - 65" of gaming goodness - and don't forget that added bonus of the theatre surround the TV is hooked to

    funny thing when i had to go back to my 24" widescreen lcd while waiting for a replacement lamp that blew on the TV i actually felt claustrophobic

     

    Well, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that the bigger your TV is larger the pixels will be. You only get 1,080 lines of vertical resolution regardless of the screen size. Now, if you sit far enough, it will not bother your, but if you sit at the typical monitor viewing distance you will notice it clearly.

     

    "The person who experiences greatness must have a feeling for the myth he is in."

  • drbaltazardrbaltazar Member UncommonPosts: 7,856

    true HD is 19xx X10xx  right size is 23 or 24 inch if i recall.dont know about the 96 inch projector tho!you might have to google!

    but the other is right!at one point your screen might be too big for area your trying to vew it if you got a 96 inch screen and try to view it from 3 feet away you might not like the pixel.

  • gatherisgatheris Member UncommonPosts: 1,016
    Originally posted by thexrated

    Originally posted by gatheris

    Originally posted by thexrated


    With a good TV, the input lag is hardly noticiable. The problem I got with TVs is the 1920x1080 resolution. I prefer 1900x1200 for my computing needs.
    However, I do enjoy playing games with a large TV while, doing other stuff on my 28" monitor. Have to say Mass Effect 2 looked absolutely fantastic on my 46" TV.
    If you are looking to substitute your monitor to a LCD-TV, few tips:
    - Do not get over 32", the pixels get too big when looked from a typical viewing distance with the 1920*1080.
    - Get one with a good screen, not the cheapest option, but one with favorable reviews. There are many 32" LCD TVs that are suitable for gaming,
     



    i use a 65" DLP and i don't have the pixel problem you write of  - - - only a problem with large LCD-TVs?  maybe the video card doesn't output to TV correctly?

    don't know but i couldn't be happier with my picture quality - - - 65" of gaming goodness - and don't forget that added bonus of the theatre surround the TV is hooked to

    funny thing when i had to go back to my 24" widescreen lcd while waiting for a replacement lamp that blew on the TV i actually felt claustrophobic

     

    Well, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that the bigger your TV is larger the pixels will be. You only get 1,080 lines of vertical resolution regardless of the screen size. Now, if you sit far enough, it will not bother your, but if you sit at the typical monitor viewing distance you will notice it clearly.

     



     

    well, maybe it does take a rocket scientist - - - look into DLP

    and i sit probably less than six feet away from the screen - even less if i have my headphones on cause i'm on skype while playing (frikkin short cord)

     

    image

  • thexratedthexrated Member UncommonPosts: 1,368

    This thread was about monitors.

    "The person who experiences greatness must have a feeling for the myth he is in."

  • gatherisgatheris Member UncommonPosts: 1,016
    Originally posted by thexrated


    This thread was about monitors.



     

    despite your failed attempt to be a forum cop this thread IS still about TV vs Monitor

     

    image

  • Skatty2007Skatty2007 Member, Newbie CommonPosts: 231

    A while ago I bought a high quality 38" HDTV. Out of curiosity I hooked it up to my PC running 1920x1080 resolution, the native resolution of the the monitor.

    It wasn't very good.  I looked at it from a normal monitor-veiwing distance (3-4 feet) and the pixellation was readily apparant.  In my experience, it seems like HDTVs may work as good monitors but the larger it is, the less quality you will get due to the fact that the same pixel size now has to cover more surface area the larger the TV is.

    I would recommend not using an HDTV over 30" or so for PC gaming at max resolution when viewing at a normal monitor viewing distance.

    I'm not creative enough to have a signature

  • drbaltazardrbaltazar Member UncommonPosts: 7,856

    mm if i recall every foot of screen you got to be 3 feet or more away so for a 38 inch you should be around 10 feet or so away.

  • gatherisgatheris Member UncommonPosts: 1,016

    again

    this a dlp projection tv and it is the first TV that actually looks great hooked up to a computer - had tried 2 other HD televisions before this one (one was a 34" tube and the other was a 55" projection)

    now while the tv only has one of these DLP chips in it there are digital theatre systems with just 3 of these chips

    do you think that the humongous (comparably) theatre screen picture is pixelated?

    image

  • luckypotatoluckypotato Member Posts: 251

    Think about buying a plasma if your not worried about Burn-in.

    Burn-in is hardly a problem anymore actually..

     

    But anyway. with plasma's the difference between 720p and 1080p is almost undetectable unless your closer than 5 ft away and have a very good eye.

    Not to mention its .001m/s responce time

    2,000,000:1 contrast ratio

    and 600hz

    plus no input lag due to 1.3 HDMI

    With a glorious 42''

    All for $600

    Its a steal

    I seriously just bought one for myself. i cant wait for it to get home xD

     

     

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