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UO vs EQ

ZindaihasZindaihas Member UncommonPosts: 3,662

Ok folks, I apologize if this issue has been debated before, but if it has, I missed it, so I thought I would raise it myself (and if it hasn't, let the debate begin).  The reason I bring it up is because when someone starts a thread like, "What's your favorite MMO of all-time?", these two ground breaking games consistently appear more often than all the others (at least that's the way it seems to me).  So, I'm curious to hear from gamers, particularly those who have played both.  Which game is the better of the two?  If you want to break it down into different categories (graphics, community, etc.) that's fine, but what I'm really wondering is, overall, which game was the more fun to play.

From my perspective, EQ was the first and still the best MMORPG I ever played.  I never played UO, but I hear similiar sentiments from those who started with that game.  So I'm wondering is it's because it's the first that makes it the best, or is it because the devs of those games had something that others don't.  I'd appreciate if you would qualify your response instead of simply saying one was better than the other.  And if you happen to think both games sucked and something else is way better than either, feel free to say so as well.  Just make sure you back it up with an argument.

sacredcow4Eronakis
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Comments

  • zieenzieen Member, Newbie CommonPosts: 414

    There is no best of the two. They are the roots of the opposite extremes of MMORPG's.

    UO is for the people who can handle the mindless repetitiveness of PVP (Explosion, Energy Bolt. Explosion, Energy Bolt. Poison, Explosion, Energy Bolt, etc.). The players that prefer open-pvp and full looting.

    EQ is for the people who can handle the mindless repetiveness of raiding. The players that either despise PVP or prefer it in moderation. These are generally the folks that don't want to lose their gear -- and with good reason. Being force to raid for hours to get an item and then lose it in a 10 second gank is not fun.

    The other KEY difference is skill-based characters (UO) and level-based characters (EQ).

    PVP is much more balanced in the skill-based system, but this is at the cost of MUCH balancing. A relatively new character can stand up against a veteran. The issue here is that the hybrid/tank mage tends to be the ultimate PVPer.

    In EQ, PVP is dependent on level and gear. A new player wouldn't stand a chance against a veteran. The level difference results in the inability to even hit the higher player in most cases. The power of your gear also influences PVP, which leads back to the need to raid for hours on end.

    I am of course referring to old school UO -- pre-Trammel.

    Today, those who argue for graphical quality over all (or almost all) would more than likely say EQ is the better MMORPG. EQ has aged much better than UO, with substantial graphic upgrades.

    Also, EQ tends to be favored by the RPers, as look and character customization is a big issue with your average RPer.

    I'm speaking from personal experience here. I've went through my times as a powergaming PK as well as my times as a Powergaming RPer (despised by those unwilling to look past powergaming). I don't claim anything I've said to be the opinion of the majority, simply my opinion.

    AlBQuirkyTimukas

    The modern MMORPG is simply not worthy, of the acronym RPG. The straight grind and lack of atmosphere leave me with no choice. From this day forth, World of Warcraft, Everquest 2, and all the games like them shall be referred to as PIGCRAP. People In Guilds Constantly Raiding And Power-leveling

  • AngelboundAngelbound Member, Newbie CommonPosts: 1,437

    I agree eq was the best mmorpg that I ever played as well, as far as mindless raiding goes it isnt like your describing it in eq, it was alot of fun. Although I do not play any games with raiding anymore its a waste of my life unless its casual raiding, besides I dont care for gear atm im playing coh/cov to fix those things. But the game grew enormously and had alot to offer it was one game I never grew bored of.

  • AnofalyeAnofalye Member, Newbie CommonPosts: 7,433

    The 1st gen MMO = UO

    The 2nd gen MMO = WoW (used to be EQ)

    The 3rd gen MMO = Not release yet, and I don't see it coming soon...I wish I will be surprised.

    chrisapete123sacredcow4iixviiiixalkarionlog

    - "If I understand you well, you are telling me until next time. " - Ren

  • MacroPlanetMacroPlanet Member UncommonPosts: 1,088
    Anofalye said:

    The 1st gen MMO = UO

    The 2nd gen MMO = WoW (used to be EQ)

    The 3rd gen MMO = Not release yet, and I don't see it coming soon...I wish I will be surprised.


    Came across this post from 2006 and thought I'd revive it.

    Considering it's been 14 years since predicting this; what are your thoughts now?

    What would we consider the 3rd gen and the 4th, 5th?
    AlBQuirky
  • AlBQuirkyAlBQuirky Member EpicPosts: 6,158
    I can't compare as I played only EQ. Some of what I've heard about UO, though, makes me wonder if I missed out on something.

    Back in 2001 when I got into EQ, I did look into UO and basically the isometric graphics were not my cup of tea. I had played too many single player games with the same (or similar) graphics and found I was often "blinded" by obstacles like walls. UO also had PvP which was something I avoid. I'm not putting my gameplay in the hands of strangers and hope for the best :)

    What intrigued me about UO was the skill system: You use it, it improves. EQ's level up system was strange, at times. You still had to use the skills to level them up, but according to class specific guidelines, all skills in that class had a cap that improved with each level, whether you used them (or it) or not.

    As I said, I can't compare.

    - Al

    Personally the only modern MMORPG trend that annoys me is the idea that MMOs need to be designed in a way to attract people who don't actually like MMOs. Which to me makes about as much sense as someone trying to figure out a way to get vegetarians to eat at their steakhouse.
    - FARGIN_WAR


  • AmarantharAmaranthar Member EpicPosts: 4,113
    AlBQuirky said:
    I can't compare as I played only EQ. Some of what I've heard about UO, though, makes me wonder if I missed out on something.

    Back in 2001 when I got into EQ, I did look into UO and basically the isometric graphics were not my cup of tea. I had played too many single player games with the same (or similar) graphics and found I was often "blinded" by obstacles like walls. UO also had PvP which was something I avoid. I'm not putting my gameplay in the hands of strangers and hope for the best :)

    What intrigued me about UO was the skill system: You use it, it improves. EQ's level up system was strange, at times. You still had to use the skills to level them up, but according to class specific guidelines, all skills in that class had a cap that improved with each level, whether you used them (or it) or not.

    As I said, I can't compare.
    I'll try to describe UO for you and any others that don't know what it was like. 

    Keep in mind that it's been a long time since I played it at all. So I may get some things a little wrong. 

    +++++++++
    Skill system. 

    You could use any skill at any time. 
    When you did successfully, it went up a little. 
    You started at 15 in all skills (meaning a 15% chance to be successful using it) I think it was. 
    UO was very fast paced, so misses weren't aggravating, generally speaking.  

    Use it once, successfully, and it went up to 15.1. And so on, to a max of 100. 
    Skills went up faster early, slower as you got up in the skill. It didn't take long to get to 30 skill. Maybe a couple hours if you were playing intensely. I don't know for sure, most of us "just played" and time went by fast. 
    Max in a skill was 100 points.
    You had a max total of all skill points combined. I think it was 500 points. 
    So you had to choose which ones to use. 
    You could build your character with 5 skills at 100, or 3 at 100 and the other 200 points divided between 3 or 4 skills, or however you wanted it. 

    That became a problem as players ended up with unwanted points in skills, so they added a system where you could mark each skill to go up, down, or lock it. 
    If you wanted to drop one skill for another, you changed their settings how you wanted it. 
    As you skilled up in the desired skills, and if you were at the Max of 700 total, it robbed points from skills set to go down.
    So if you were dropping a skill, you still had it, it just went down as the other skills went up. 
    +++++++++++++++

    Stats. 

    There were only 3. Strength, Constitution, and Intelligence. 
    Strength added to physical damage.
    Constitution was HPs
    Intelligence was you Mana Pool for magic casting. 

    You started at 15 points in each. 
    Each stat went up as you used a skill that corresponded to it. But much slower than Skills went up. 

    So your damage, HPs, and Mana Pool went up as you used skills associated with them. 

    They each had a max of 100 too. 
    I don't think there was a total max, as 300 served that well. 
    ++++++++++++++

    I'll continue in the next post....
    AlBQuirky

    Once upon a time....

  • AethaerynAethaeryn Member RarePosts: 3,092
    My experience would back yours up.  I was playing UO and got the beta for Everquest.  I tried it out for a bit but was still into UO.  I got lost easily and found the isometric view and skill based (not player skill) system more to my liking.  I would have LOVED both games but only had time for one.  For me it was the first.  It could be coincidence but I bet if I was heavily into EQ I would have not bothered much with UO.

    Interesting point.  Meridian actually had me so grabbed that I almost didn't try anything after that either :)
    AlBQuirky

    Wa min God! Se æx on min heafod is!

  • AmarantharAmaranthar Member EpicPosts: 4,113
    Continued from previous post......

    Gear and wearables.

    Slots

    You had slots for:
    - Head (helmet, hats, bandana, a variety of non armor headwear for Mages or those who wanted the look. 
    - Neck, (gorget armor or necklaces). (I think earrings fit here too. I remember you had to replace an armor piece to wear magical earrings)
    - Torso #1 (shirt)
    - Torso #2 (worn over #1) (Armor)
    - Torso #3 (over the others) (tunic, surcoat, or robe)
    - Torso #4 (Sash over top of all)
    - Arms (fit under Torsos #3 and 4 like the chest armor, but showed with a surcoat since they don't cover the arms) (Armor, shirt sleeves or bare arms showed if not covered)
    - Hands (Armor or rings, not both)
    - Waste (a kilt)
    - Legs #1 (Pants, long or those medieval type that ended below the knee)
    - Legs #2 (over top of #1) (armor)

    Since you could dye clothing items a wide range of colors, and with the choices above, players could have Guild Uniforms, or set a "look" for themselves. 

    Armor and Weapons

    There were no levels with huge Power Gaps, so there wasn't sets of gear designed for level groupings.
    However, there was a range of improvements based on the Blacksmith's Skill.
    AND there were 3 ways an item could improve. 
    Damage or armor, durability (items wore out, but could be repaired), and accuracy(/evasion?). 

    Basically, it was the basic item stats, plus 4 ranges of improvements.
    Basic, +1 (damage or armor rating), +2, +3, and +4. 

    Although those numbers seem small, you could really feel the difference.
    The top end weapons were call "Vanquishing", and they lived up to their name. 

    When a Blacksmith made an item, if I recall, there were chances that it could go up in any of those 3 ways, up to his Skill's ability. 
    So if his skill allows him to make a +4 item, it might turn out to be +3 instead. 
    So a sword made by a Grand Master Blacksmith (100 skill) might be +4 in each of the 3 ways of improvements, or +4, +3,  and +1 in any combination. There was a randomness that was more likely to hit the high marks with higher skill. 

    Continued.....




    AlBQuirky

    Once upon a time....

  • AmarantharAmaranthar Member EpicPosts: 4,113
    edited April 11
    The Sandbox World

    Very open to players.
    That didn't mean that some places were too dangerous for lower skilled characters. 
    Dungeons were more dangerous the deeper you went into them. 
    Some open sky areas were very dangerous.
    I think this is like EQ. But there was a huge difference in the Power gaps. 

    With the above, players weren't separated by levels like modern games. 
    Guilds often had a wide range of members with various total skill point advancement. 

    You single clicked something, anything, to "look" at it. 
    A description popped up in text. 

    You double clicked an item to "use" it. 

    If it was out of range (basically hitting the ground), you got a text message saying "you are out of range". Or you might hit something else. 

    You double clicked a tool to use it. 
    Blacksmith hammers, sewing kits, etc. 
    This included things like doors or chests. 

    UO had interesting things in the world, I think EQ like from what I've read. 
    Players would click or double click on items to see if there was anything unusual about them. They often were obviously different, sometime they "just looked a little different." 

    The end? lol There's so much about the worldly aspects that I'm leaving out. 
    Writing books in-game, as an example. Chess boards, as another. 
    Pouring wine from a bottle into a glass, drinking it, and doing that 5 times before the bottle was empty, as another example. 
    Building furniture and placing it in the world, as another. 

    I think that'll do for now. 
    AlBQuirky

    Once upon a time....

  • AmarantharAmaranthar Member EpicPosts: 4,113
    Aethaeryn said:
    My experience would back yours up.  I was playing UO and got the beta for Everquest.  I tried it out for a bit but was still into UO.  I got lost easily and found the isometric view and skill based (not player skill) system more to my liking.  I would have LOVED both games but only had time for one.  For me it was the first.  It could be coincidence but I bet if I was heavily into EQ I would have not bothered much with UO.

    Interesting point.  Meridian actually had me so grabbed that I almost didn't try anything after that either :)

    For me, I had a background on online games from deep discussions with my D&D friends, years before computer gaming was feasible. I mean Pong era. 

    We loved D&D, but realized that that system wouldn't work for a whole world full of players. Too much division of ability in levels. 

    UO was exactly the way we envisioned an online, massively populated world would have to be. 
    But of course others didn't see it that way and producers built D&D into their games. 


    Once upon a time....

  • ScorchienScorchien Member LegendaryPosts: 7,342
    Ive played UO 23 years now there is not even a VS imo .. UO is superior virtual world in every way , There are literally 4x the player activities in UO , and its a much more challenging game imo ..

     I had some friends i jumped into EQ with and when i started playing it definitley felt like care bear game ... coming from UO .. very easy also imo without the threat of player interference/interaction  it was boring .. Played to lvl 60 was the cap at the time andnever went back as did none of my friends .. ..
    blueturtle13
  • AmarantharAmaranthar Member EpicPosts: 4,113
    edited April 11
    Oops. One more post.

    Strategies. 

    UO didn't have special attacks like modern games.
    It was very fast combat action, so strategies were important. Timing was everything, sometimes. 

    Potions. Heals, Cures (had to cure poisons before you could heal), Invisibility, were used a lot. 
    There were potions that boosted your Stats, and the associated points (HP.s Damage, Mana). 

    There were rings, necklaces, and earrings that boosted you stats too. They had charges that wore off as you wore them, 1 point per second. So you didn't want to wear them longer than needed. 

    When in trouble, and trying to run vs. a spell casting MOB, sometimes a player would use teleport to "jump" away, then hit "Hide". If done right, you'd be hidden. If not, you might take a dirt nap. 

    Teleporting to ledges was an easy way to avoid physical attacks. 

    The typical tag teaming, training, etc. 

    There wasn't near as many options like modern games. But the fast pace meant you had to really stay on your toes. It was, perhaps, more exciting because of that. 

    Also, in UO, there was Blocking. You didn't want to get surrounded and outclassed by MOBs. This wasn't a real problem as most MOBs were slow. But still, don't sleep at the wheel. 



    AlBQuirky

    Once upon a time....

  • UngoodUngood Member EpicPosts: 4,138
    UO was an Isometric game. It was Open World PvP, and on that alone, I gave it a hard pass. I have noticed that very few MMO's today use this setting, those that do, tend to either be nostalgia driven games, like Albion, or because it was just easier to make a what amounted to a 8bit, 2D Iso world, like Runescape.

    EQ was a 3rd person view, fully 3D world, that was primary a hack/slash PvE MMO, that paved the way for a future of 3D world MMO's, and is noted for spawning the Juggernaut WoW.

    As for better, while that will always be a matter of personal taste, I would say as far as influence goes, given that almost all modern MMO's feel more akin to EQ then UO, that should give us an answer to that question.
    AlBQuirkyVengeSunsoar
    Egotism is the anesthetic that dullens the pain of stupidity, this is why when I try to beat my head against the stupidity of other people, I only hurt myself.
  • TokkenTokken Member RarePosts: 2,475
    No comparison. two totally different games. 
    AlBQuirky
    Make PvE GREAT Again!
  • AethaerynAethaeryn Member RarePosts: 3,092
    Aethaeryn said:
    My experience would back yours up.  I was playing UO and got the beta for Everquest.  I tried it out for a bit but was still into UO.  I got lost easily and found the isometric view and skill based (not player skill) system more to my liking.  I would have LOVED both games but only had time for one.  For me it was the first.  It could be coincidence but I bet if I was heavily into EQ I would have not bothered much with UO.

    Interesting point.  Meridian actually had me so grabbed that I almost didn't try anything after that either :)

    For me, I had a background on online games from deep discussions with my D&D friends, years before computer gaming was feasible. I mean Pong era. 

    We loved D&D, but realized that that system wouldn't work for a whole world full of players. Too much division of ability in levels. 

    UO was exactly the way we envisioned an online, massively populated world would have to be. 
    But of course others didn't see it that way and producers built D&D into their games. 


    For sure. . Too bad it didn't end up the way I had envisioned it.  It was the closest thing though.     Before Beta we all made guilds etc and decided where we would be based out of (not realizing the easy of travel and small size of the world.  The ecology also failed (great video by Lord Brittish on that).  Still great.  MUDS might have been close but I agree.  Everyone can't be an adventurer etc.     I think they had an awesome design team and awesome ideas.  It worked out fairly well.  I just go back to table top for D&D needs. . trying to anyway :)
    AlBQuirky

    Wa min God! Se æx on min heafod is!

  • Viper482Viper482 Member EpicPosts: 3,096
    Very different games, UO was more sandbox where EQ was the beginning of the theme park era, just not to the extent you see today. 

    UO was my first, and it was amazing not just because of that. The first time you set out into the woods to hunt and chop wood or whatever the tension was unforgiving, as a red name, who is such for murdering too many innocents, could pop out at any moment to kill you and take all your stuff. It happened to me a few times lol.

    So I joined an RP guild called Defenders of Justice (DOJ), it was RP and an anti-pk guild which meant we hunted down red names. Not only that, but there were Orc guilds who wore all orc armor and orc masks and roleplayed orcs, we were at war with them and would have really cool fights. They would strictly wear only orc armor, which wasn't that good, just to stay in character. They even hung out in the orc areas in game. The whole thing was just an amazing experience. I have memories from EQ, but nothing like that. 
    AlBQuirky
    Make MMORPG's Great Again!
  • AmarantharAmaranthar Member EpicPosts: 4,113
    Aethaeryn said:
    Aethaeryn said:
    My experience would back yours up.  I was playing UO and got the beta for Everquest.  I tried it out for a bit but was still into UO.  I got lost easily and found the isometric view and skill based (not player skill) system more to my liking.  I would have LOVED both games but only had time for one.  For me it was the first.  It could be coincidence but I bet if I was heavily into EQ I would have not bothered much with UO.

    Interesting point.  Meridian actually had me so grabbed that I almost didn't try anything after that either :)

    For me, I had a background on online games from deep discussions with my D&D friends, years before computer gaming was feasible. I mean Pong era. 

    We loved D&D, but realized that that system wouldn't work for a whole world full of players. Too much division of ability in levels. 

    UO was exactly the way we envisioned an online, massively populated world would have to be. 
    But of course others didn't see it that way and producers built D&D into their games. 


    For sure. . Too bad it didn't end up the way I had envisioned it.  It was the closest thing though.     Before Beta we all made guilds etc and decided where we would be based out of (not realizing the easy of travel and small size of the world.  The ecology also failed (great video by Lord Brittish on that).  Still great.  MUDS might have been close but I agree.  Everyone can't be an adventurer etc.     I think they had an awesome design team and awesome ideas.  It worked out fairly well.  I just go back to table top for D&D needs. . trying to anyway :)
    LOL, I had plans on going to Oclo(?) because of the large bay in the island, and making a fortune selling Black Pearl. 

    Once upon a time....

  • AmarantharAmaranthar Member EpicPosts: 4,113
    Viper482 said:
    Very different games, UO was more sandbox where EQ was the beginning of the theme park era, just not to the extent you see today. 

    UO was my first, and it was amazing not just because of that. The first time you set out into the woods to hunt and chop wood or whatever the tension was unforgiving, as a red name, who is such for murdering too many innocents, could pop out at any moment to kill you and take all your stuff. It happened to me a few times lol.

    So I joined an RP guild called Defenders of Justice (DOJ), it was RP and an anti-pk guild which meant we hunted down red names. Not only that, but there were Orc guilds who wore all orc armor and orc masks and roleplayed orcs, we were at war with them and would have really cool fights. They would strictly wear only orc armor, which wasn't that good, just to stay in character. They even hung out in the orc areas in game. The whole thing was just an amazing experience. I have memories from EQ, but nothing like that. 

    Yub (yes in Orc), they even had their own language. Fun group. They extended onto my shard after they got established. 

    I joined a RP guild that was anti-PK too. We defended Rat Valley (later Orc Valley) and the spawn there against PKers and looters. 
    Viper482

    Once upon a time....

  • AmarantharAmaranthar Member EpicPosts: 4,113
    edited April 12
    Any of you old UO beta folks remember on the forums ...now I can't remember the name of the forum site. Not the one Spectre and the Mage Tower was on, the other one. 
    But do you remember the Blade and Barbasol events? 

    Blade was your typical boasting "going to kill you all" type. Barbasol was an extreme RPer who just wanted to visit all the Shrines, a true monk type character. 
    And after a fairly long while, it was discovered they were the same poster when he slipped up and posted under the wrong name. (possibly intentionally, as a stunt, just for fun)

    "Barbasol" is a shaving cream, to go along with "Blade."


    Fun stuff, even before the game released. 
    blueturtle13

    Once upon a time....

  • Viper482Viper482 Member EpicPosts: 3,096
    Viper482 said:
    Very different games, UO was more sandbox where EQ was the beginning of the theme park era, just not to the extent you see today. 

    UO was my first, and it was amazing not just because of that. The first time you set out into the woods to hunt and chop wood or whatever the tension was unforgiving, as a red name, who is such for murdering too many innocents, could pop out at any moment to kill you and take all your stuff. It happened to me a few times lol.

    So I joined an RP guild called Defenders of Justice (DOJ), it was RP and an anti-pk guild which meant we hunted down red names. Not only that, but there were Orc guilds who wore all orc armor and orc masks and roleplayed orcs, we were at war with them and would have really cool fights. They would strictly wear only orc armor, which wasn't that good, just to stay in character. They even hung out in the orc areas in game. The whole thing was just an amazing experience. I have memories from EQ, but nothing like that. 

    Yub (yes in Orc), they even had their own language. Fun group. They extended onto my shard after they got established. 

    I joined a RP guild that was anti-PK too. We defended Rat Valley (later Orc Valley) and the spawn there against PKers and looters. 
    They sure did talk like that lol. I was Catskills. 

    We used to dress in peasant (nub) clothes with deadly poisoned katanas and walk along the road outside the starter area to bait pk'ers, when chunks of their health would start to go bye bye they would freak out and hurry and portal out before they died, if they were lucky lol. Good times.
    Amaranthar
    Make MMORPG's Great Again!
  • MacroPlanetMacroPlanet Member UncommonPosts: 1,088
    edited April 12
    I can appreciate both games as the 'founding fathers' of the MMORPG world.

    Ultima Online definitely was a complete virtual world. What I mean by that is that there was no order or guide telling you what you had to do or when to do it. You simply logged on and started doing whatever interest you the most. This is a game, unlike what newer "MMORPG"'s claim to have, where the world was a truly living place. Most games these days are just well designed games that you log in and do some tasks and come back tomorrow to do the same thing.

    Everquest has so much charm too. I recently just started playing Project 1999 just because I never got the chance to play EQ back in the day. I was so consumed by UO and WoW that I didn't really look back.  Going into EQ now though, I can feel the nostalgia for the old genre wash through me. It makes me want so badly the way MMORPG's used to be. 

    The reason why I 'resurrected' this thread, though, was because it has been 14 years since the last person posted on what the 3rd generation of MMORPG's would look like and I was curious what it ended up being as well as other games that pushed the genre forward.

    Anofalye said:

    The 1st gen MMO = UO

    The 2nd gen MMO = WoW (used to be EQ)

    The 3rd gen MMO = Not release yet, and I don't see it coming soon...I wish I will be surprised.


    The 1st Gen I would give it to both Ultima Online and to Everquest just because they were both extremely successful games that gave fuel to the new genre of MMORPG.

    The 2nd Gen. Could be World of Warcraft on it's own just because after that, every game tried so hard to follow suit, but could never capture the charm and magic that Blizzard had in it's MMORPG.

    So that leads us to the 3rd Gen. It would have to be the next game that help push the genre forward. To me, that game could possibly be Age of Conan. Even though it didn't really boom like WoW. To me it was the first massive MMORPG that took the combat a step forward and lead the way to 'Action Combat' that seems to be popular today. Plus the starting area's story was very well crafted, Tortage.

    Then there's the 4th Gen. What was the next game that push the industry forward even further? I feel like at this point it would have to be a title that push F2P, or B2P like GW2 or BDO. What about Elder Scrolls for bringing the game onto all consoles?


    Here's the list so far. Let me know what you think or if you'd change something:

    1st Generation MMORPG = UO & EQ

    2nd Generation MMORPG = World of Warcraft

    3rd Generation MMORPG = Age of Conan

    4th Generation MMORPG = Guild Wars 2? Black Desert Online? Elder Scrolls Online?

    5th Generation MMORPG = Probably Camelot Unchained, Crowfall, New World?


    UngoodAlBQuirkyAmaranthar
  • LuidenLuiden Member UncommonPosts: 275

    Here's the list so far. Let me know what you think or if you'd change something:

    1st Generation MMORPG = UO & EQ

    2nd Generation MMORPG = World of Warcraft

    3rd Generation MMORPG = Age of Conan

    4th Generation MMORPG = Guild Wars 2? Black Desert Online? Elder Scrolls Online?

    5th Generation MMORPG = Probably Camelot Unchained, Crowfall, New World?


    I think it's a bit off, you have to take into account what these games brought to the table from a technology perspective.  I think it probably looks something more like this:

    1st Gen: UO - Really the only MMORPG (2D) of it's time and was earth shattering for those who played MUDs before.

    2nd Gen: EQ, DAOC - This is where we saw 3D introduced to MMORPGs.  EQ was obviously first and the most popular, DAOC came out afterwards as an answer to those who hated aspects of EQ.  Both of these games were brutal to the players though from a death perspective/grind etc.

    3rd Gen: EQ2, WoW, Eve Online - Both EQ2 and WoW were released the same month and they changed MMORPGs forever.  They were basically the answer to all the pain that players went through with Gen 2 games.  No more harsh death penalties, no more brutal grind etc.  Actually EQ2 brought some of the old EQ1 crap into it which is partly why WoW destroyed it.  WoW would continue to dominate for a long time.

    4th Gen: Here is where innovation starts to die, we see many WoW clones and companies stop exploring new ways to play a MMORPG.  Let's call it the crap generation filled with many crap MMORPGs that were focused more on getting your money than building a fun game.  This is where all the F2P, P2W scams etc come in. 

    5th Gen:  I believe this Gen will represent the next scam in MMORPGs, and that's the Go Fund Me games.. Star Citizen, Camelot Unchained.  Basically here is where we see huge wastes of money as we find out what happens when there isn't a publisher to pressure the game devs to get the game out.  Star Citizen was the poster child of this, but recent announcements by Camelot Unchained make it the bigger crook.
    AlBQuirkycheyanealkarionlog
  • AlBQuirkyAlBQuirky Member EpicPosts: 6,158
    The reason why I 'resurrected' this thread, though, was because it has been 14 years since the last person posted on what the 3rd generation of MMORPG's would look like and I was curious what it ended up being as well as other games that pushed the genre forward.

    Anofalye said:

    The 1st gen MMO = UO

    The 2nd gen MMO = WoW (used to be EQ)

    The 3rd gen MMO = Not release yet, and I don't see it coming soon...I wish I will be surprised.


    And I went and screwed it all up! YAY me! :lol:

    UO was the pinnacle of first gen, as many were around before UO.

    EQ and others brought 3D into the genre.

    Wow & EQ 2 made quests number one.

    Action combat comes next, but I'm not sure who to blame award for that.

    I haven't seen any "genre defining" features since then, unless one counts monetization schemes.

    - Al

    Personally the only modern MMORPG trend that annoys me is the idea that MMOs need to be designed in a way to attract people who don't actually like MMOs. Which to me makes about as much sense as someone trying to figure out a way to get vegetarians to eat at their steakhouse.
    - FARGIN_WAR


  • cheyanecheyane Member EpicPosts: 7,116
    edited April 12
    It was full loot PvP in UO then. I avoided it at all costs and stayed with Everquest so no idea sorry.

    Also the OP has been gone since January of 2019 he may never get to read this.
    Martens: "With all due respect, madam, where are you going with this?"
    Avasarala: "Wherever I goddamn like."
  • AmarantharAmaranthar Member EpicPosts: 4,113
    Viper482 said:
    Viper482 said:
    Very different games, UO was more sandbox where EQ was the beginning of the theme park era, just not to the extent you see today. 

    UO was my first, and it was amazing not just because of that. The first time you set out into the woods to hunt and chop wood or whatever the tension was unforgiving, as a red name, who is such for murdering too many innocents, could pop out at any moment to kill you and take all your stuff. It happened to me a few times lol.

    So I joined an RP guild called Defenders of Justice (DOJ), it was RP and an anti-pk guild which meant we hunted down red names. Not only that, but there were Orc guilds who wore all orc armor and orc masks and roleplayed orcs, we were at war with them and would have really cool fights. They would strictly wear only orc armor, which wasn't that good, just to stay in character. They even hung out in the orc areas in game. The whole thing was just an amazing experience. I have memories from EQ, but nothing like that. 

    Yub (yes in Orc), they even had their own language. Fun group. They extended onto my shard after they got established. 

    I joined a RP guild that was anti-PK too. We defended Rat Valley (later Orc Valley) and the spawn there against PKers and looters. 
    They sure did talk like that lol. I was Catskills. 

    We used to dress in peasant (nub) clothes with deadly poisoned katanas and walk along the road outside the starter area to bait pk'ers, when chunks of their health would start to go bye bye they would freak out and hurry and portal out before they died, if they were lucky lol. Good times.
    Yes, players had some good responses to the PKers. It's too bad that that didn't take off more, everything might be different. 

    I met a guy from Catskills once who told me that used archers. Naked archers. They offered nothing for reward if killed and looted. 

    They'd hide around the crossroads where PKers went, and all of a sudden a whole bunch of arrows would bring down some and send the rest fleeing back to momma. lol
    Viper482

    Once upon a time....

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