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Windows 11 needs TPM 2.0

TillerTiller Member LegendaryPosts: 9,656
Quick F.Y.I. for those that don't know...

Apparently you need TPM 2.0 for Windows 11 (if you want to make the jump). Most newer cpu have the functionality already.

This might save you a click.



Only thing from here is to look up specific MB or PC and enable it in Bios /or use buy a HW version and find the TPM header and install.

SWG Bloodfin vet
Elder Jedi/Elder Bounty Hunter
 
Torval

Comments

  • maskedweaselmaskedweasel Member EpicPosts: 11,096
    What's also important is there are a ton of processors that "aren't supported" even some older ryzen processors,  so keep that in mind. 



  • TorvalTorval Member LegendaryPosts: 21,555
    What's also important is there are a ton of processors that "aren't supported" even some older ryzen processors,  so keep that in mind. 
    Most CPUs in the last 3 - 4 years have TPM integrated so it isn't too uncommon. Most motherboards also have a TPM slot that support TPM 2.0 modules. These tend to cost between $15 - $35 depending on the motherboard and the module it supports. This support goes back several years beyond current gen CPU so a lot of people can install a TPM even if their CPU is too old to have it integrated. Even my newish ASUS TUF has a TPM slot, but I don't nee done because my 3700X has it integrated.

    Since Win10 will be supported for 4+ years it isn't that big a deal if people can upgrade older hardware. There is always some Linux distro for really old stuff so there is that option too.
    traveller, interloper, anomaly, iteration


  • maskedweaselmaskedweasel Member EpicPosts: 11,096
    Torval said:
    What's also important is there are a ton of processors that "aren't supported" even some older ryzen processors,  so keep that in mind. 
    Most CPUs in the last 3 - 4 years have TPM integrated so it isn't too uncommon. Most motherboards also have a TPM slot that support TPM 2.0 modules. These tend to cost between $15 - $35 depending on the motherboard and the module it supports. This support goes back several years beyond current gen CPU so a lot of people can install a TPM even if their CPU is too old to have it integrated. Even my newish ASUS TUF has a TPM slot, but I don't nee done because my 3700X has it integrated.

    Since Win10 will be supported for 4+ years it isn't that big a deal if people can upgrade older hardware. There is always some Linux distro for really old stuff so there is that option too.
    Oh not just the TPM thing, some CPUs "aren't supported", most notably first gen Ryzen CPU's and they are around 4 years old or so, and first and second gen are very close. 

    Windows 11 will still technically run on it, but it isn't supported and they won't support drivers for it. Same with 7th gen intel. So just something to keep in mind. 

    But you're right windows 10 will be supported for a while still. 



  • TorvalTorval Member LegendaryPosts: 21,555
    Yes, that's true and it isn't just a CPU thing. Motherboards need to support UEFI bootloaders. Microsoft is looking to drop support for older hardware period and want to set a baseline for AVX, FMA, and SSE. https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=28852484
    Iselin
    traveller, interloper, anomaly, iteration


  • IselinIselin Member LegendaryPosts: 16,305
    Torval said:
    Yes, that's true and it isn't just a CPU thing. Motherboards need to support UEFI bootloaders. Microsoft is looking to drop support for older hardware period and want to set a baseline for AVX, FMA, and SSE. https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=28852484
    UEFI secure boot and TPM are the two main things. On my PC they were both off by default in the BIOS but they were there. It was just a matter of flipping both of those things on and then I was Windows 11 upgrade eligible.

    I actually did that several months back when I was curious and ran their checking tool since Win10 also supports both of those things.

    When I upgraded a couple of days ago it was no fuss, no muss. It was actually the smoothest and fastest Windows update ever for me since a lot of it happens in the background in Win10 while you keep using your PC. The restart part with several reboots before you're back in Windows took 15 minutes at most.
    Torval
    "Social media gives legions of idiots the right to speak when they once only spoke at a bar after a glass of wine, without harming the community ... but now they have the same right to speak as a Nobel Prize winner. It's the invasion of the idiots”

    ― Umberto Eco

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  • Mylan12Mylan12 Member UncommonPosts: 286
    Torval said:
    What's also important is there are a ton of processors that "aren't supported" even some older ryzen processors,  so keep that in mind. 
    Most CPUs in the last 3 - 4 years have TPM integrated so it isn't too uncommon. Most motherboards also have a TPM slot that support TPM 2.0 modules. These tend to cost between $15 - $35 depending on the motherboard and the module it supports. This support goes back several years beyond current gen CPU so a lot of people can install a TPM even if their CPU is too old to have it integrated. Even my newish ASUS TUF has a TPM slot, but I don't nee done because my 3700X has it integrated.

    Since Win10 will be supported for 4+ years it isn't that big a deal if people can upgrade older hardware. There is always some Linux distro for really old stuff so there is that option too.
    Oh not just the TPM thing, some CPUs "aren't supported", most notably first gen Ryzen CPU's and they are around 4 years old or so, and first and second gen are very close. 

    Windows 11 will still technically run on it, but it isn't supported and they won't support drivers for it. Same with 7th gen intel. So just something to keep in mind. 

    But you're right windows 10 will be supported for a while still. 
    Yeah my PC has TPM, UEFI secure boot and most everything else they require except for the CPU which is an 7th gen intel so guess I stay with windows 10 and probably go back to linux when they drop win 10 support.

    Hopefully they will not require Win 11 for some of the government sites I have to access. 
    maskedweasel
  • TorvalTorval Member LegendaryPosts: 21,555
    Iselin said:
    Torval said:
    Yes, that's true and it isn't just a CPU thing. Motherboards need to support UEFI bootloaders. Microsoft is looking to drop support for older hardware period and want to set a baseline for AVX, FMA, and SSE. https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=28852484
    UEFI secure boot and TPM are the two main things. On my PC they were both off by default in the BIOS but they were there. It was just a matter of flipping both of those things on and then I was Windows 11 upgrade eligible.

    I actually did that several months back when I was curious and ran their checking tool since Win10 also supports both of those things.

    When I upgraded a couple of days ago it was no fuss, no muss. It was actually the smoothest and fastest Windows update ever for me since a lot of it happens in the background in Win10 while you keep using your PC. The restart part with several reboots before you're back in Windows took 15 minutes at most.
    I ran the update around the end of August or beginning of September. It's been pretty smooth so far. I just had to enable AMD TPM in the bootloader because I had it off because Fedora and GRUB didn't support it at the time.

    Widgets, Search, and Chat buttons got disabled. I don't want them there. I left the task bar buttons in the middle and kept Virtual Desktops on the task bar as well.

    Since I use Task Manager a bit I pinned it to my Start Menu. That was really the only change that threw me off a bit and was an easy fix.

    traveller, interloper, anomaly, iteration


  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,258
    Torval said:
    Iselin said:
    Torval said:
    Yes, that's true and it isn't just a CPU thing. Motherboards need to support UEFI bootloaders. Microsoft is looking to drop support for older hardware period and want to set a baseline for AVX, FMA, and SSE. https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=28852484
    UEFI secure boot and TPM are the two main things. On my PC they were both off by default in the BIOS but they were there. It was just a matter of flipping both of those things on and then I was Windows 11 upgrade eligible.

    I actually did that several months back when I was curious and ran their checking tool since Win10 also supports both of those things.

    When I upgraded a couple of days ago it was no fuss, no muss. It was actually the smoothest and fastest Windows update ever for me since a lot of it happens in the background in Win10 while you keep using your PC. The restart part with several reboots before you're back in Windows took 15 minutes at most.
    I ran the update around the end of August or beginning of September. It's been pretty smooth so far. I just had to enable AMD TPM in the bootloader because I had it off because Fedora and GRUB didn't support it at the time.

    Widgets, Search, and Chat buttons got disabled. I don't want them there. I left the task bar buttons in the middle and kept Virtual Desktops on the task bar as well.

    Since I use Task Manager a bit I pinned it to my Start Menu. That was really the only change that threw me off a bit and was an easy fix.

    Yeah, apart from the Start menu looking a bit different and some of the Control Panels / Settings things getting yet another redesign, I can't really notice a huge difference.

    There have been Win10 Updates that have changed more than going to Win11 has. I think it just got a number release so they would have a good break point to enforce the new security requirements.
    Torval
  • EldrachEldrach Member UncommonPosts: 255
    None of the gaming features that will come with Windows 11 is ready yet - I’ll just wait for Direct Storage before i bother upgrading
    Ridelynn
  • TorvalTorval Member LegendaryPosts: 21,555
    Updated gaming features will be nice, but a lack of direct storage didn't seem like a good reason not to update the OS. I've really not hit a bandwidth wall using just SATA SSDs so I'm not sure how much real world performance I'm going to squeeze out of Direct Storage that I'm not seeing now.

    The most important gaming feature that has been hinted at is how they're installed. Currently they use a very locked down system via the Windows Store which makes modding or manually editing config files a nightmare if that works at all. Microsoft has hinted they want to move to a saner more traditional install model that will allow easier modding and game updates. This is probably the number one gaming oriented feature I hope makes it to release.

    I'd like to see much better and more aggressive Windows Store curation but at this point that's a pipe dream.
    traveller, interloper, anomaly, iteration


  • Jean-Luc_PicardJean-Luc_Picard Member LegendaryPosts: 9,126
    If it's not broken, don't fix it.
    Sticking to Windows 10 for now... I'll upgrade once the issues have been ironed out.
    ScotMendelKyleran
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  • MendelMendel Member EpicPosts: 4,693
    If it's not broken, don't fix it.
    Sticking to Windows 10 for now... I'll upgrade once the issues have been ironed out.

    I'm probably in the same boat.  Already it is looking like a new PC in order to upgrade.  Given an option, I'd rather downgrade to Win XP.  It does everything I want.  Maybe some newer games wouldn't run, but that still leaves me with a pile of classic, older games.  Sticking with tried and true older games is a boon to my finances, so there's that.



    Logic, my dear, merely enables one to be wrong with great authority.

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