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Playable Worlds Talks Building A Cloud-Native MMO In New Interview | MMORPG.com

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Comments

  • TheocritusTheocritus Member EpicPosts: 8,333
    Second Life was just wierd...i couldn't get into that at all.....
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 23,119
    From what I've read from Raph before, and what he said in this article, "cloud-native" appears to be all about making use of cheap server power.


    Traditionally, MMORPGs run on bespoke server hardware and software. It's bloody expensive, very technical to get running properly, and slow to change.


    Raph and his team have identified that cloud hosting services like AWS or Azure offer extremely cheap server hosting that can be very easily scaled up and down. Raph wants to leverage that power. This is of course already possible in existing MMORPGs, its just very expensive and slow to scale up or down when ur running on bespoke software and hardware.



    I'll be interested to see what Playable Worlds ends up using the power for. Some interesting examples from the article, but the reality is what counts.



    Only thing that worries me from the article is the desire to play the game on multiple devices. I've yet to play a good game on a mobile phone, and I've yet to see a PC game that wasn't dramatically compromised by being ported or mobile.

    So, I've just gotta hope that any mobile access is restricted to just small parts of the game (e.g. guild chat, calendar, any micromanagement sort of stuff) and not to the main gameplay loops. If you can play the whole game from a mobile, then theres a very high chance of me hating it.
    A given amount of server power is vastly cheaper than it used to be.  For a given price tag today, you can get hundreds of times the processing power, memory, and storage space of what you could twenty years ago.  That's true even if you buy your own server, and isn't just about doing things in the cloud.

    What cloud compute providers like AWS provide is scalability.  If you need to handle 100k users online concurrently on launch day, but that drops to 10k within a month, if you buy your own servers, you're paying to effectively still have capacity for 100k concurrent users forever, even after the rush has come and gone.  On AWS, you can pay more during the brief spike then scale to whatever makes sense for the size of your playerbase quickly.  That can make the long run costs much cheaper.

    Of course, the other thing that AWS offers is the implicit threat that they might abruptly shut your game down if a bunch of trolls decide that they don't like you.
  • MendelMendel Member EpicPosts: 4,544
    The point from the article that worries me is that they are intending for the back-end to be blissfully aware of what device is using the service.  In practice, that has led to a lot of 'least common denominator' type games, where the almighty and versatile PC implementation is hampered by the necessity for compatibility with various console systems.  It is relatively easy to see in basic input systems; there's a big, noticeable difference between a 12 button controller and a 109+ button keyboard.  Let's hope this project finds a better solution to this issue.



    Torval

    Logic, my dear, merely enables one to be wrong with great authority.

  • laxielaxie Member RarePosts: 1,101
    Mendel said:
    The point from the article that worries me is that they are intending for the back-end to be blissfully aware of what device is using the service.  In practice, that has led to a lot of 'least common denominator' type games, where the almighty and versatile PC implementation is hampered by the necessity for compatibility with various console systems.  It is relatively easy to see in basic input systems; there's a big, noticeable difference between a 12 button controller and a 109+ button keyboard.  Let's hope this project finds a better solution to this issue.



    I wonder if restricting certain types of content to specific hardware would be an interesting solution or a bad design philosophy.

    This happened in Playstation Home as a byproduct - you could text chat / use voice, but text chatting in native PS3 was quite cumbersome, making voice chat the defacto only viable option.

    You could have a crafting system that works across all platforms, but logging in with a keyboard would unlock an advanced interface that lets you manage the nitty-gritty of an automated crafting pipeline (akin the EVE spreadsheet gameplay). Similarly, logging in using a smartphone with multiple front-facing cameras would unlock advanced facial animations.

    It would mean some fracturing of the community as a whole, but if the goal is a metaverse type space, it might be viable. Similar to the real world, where if you want to be a delivery driver, you need a car. The key distinction is that being a delivery driver is one of a million ways you can 'value'/express yourself as a person. If you lived on an island where everyone had a number of completed deliveries floating above their head, it would suck to not have a car. I wonder what the player perception would be on a design like this.
  • FunkyMunky42FunkyMunky42 Newbie CommonPosts: 6
    Meh, this is nothing new. Many games are already running on multiple platforms. Genshin Impact is a perfect example. This just sounds to me like a different spin on "we want to sell on mobile cause it's $$$ but we don't want to piss off our console or PC players" speech.
    Any game like this always end up inherently dumbed down to the lowest common denominator for complexity (a.k.a. simplified to play on a mobile platform). So were essentially getting a mobile game on PC or Console. Again, nothing new. only possible addition would be the issues with latency and server/client relationship, so again the game would be dumbed down to accommodate for that, so yeah...
    XodicGdemami
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