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New rig

HorusraHorusra Member EpicPosts: 4,411
Time for a new rig...anyone spot any glaring issues?

  • ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Hero (WI-FI), AMD X570 Chipset, AM4, ATX Motherboard
  • AMD Ryzen™ 5 5600X 6-Core 3.7 - 4.6GHz Turbo, AM4, 65W TDP, Retail Processor
  • EVGA GeForce RTX™ 3080 XC3 GAMING, 1440 - 1710MHz, 10GB GDDR6X, Graphics Card
  • PATRIOT MEMORY 16GB Kit (2 x 8GB) Viper Steel DDR4 4000MHz, CL19, Grey, DIMM Memory
  • EVGA 1000 G5, 80 PLUS Gold 1000W, ECO Mode, Fully Modular, ATX Power Supply
  • NOCTUA NH-U12S chromax.black, 158mm Height, 140W TDP, Copper/Aluminum CPU Cooler
  • SAMSUNG 1TB 970 EVO Plus 2280, 3500 / 3300 MB/s, V-NAND 3-bit MLC, PCIe 3.0 x4 NVMe, M.2 SSD
  • SAMSUNG 500GB 860 EVO 7mm, 550 / 520 MB/s, V-NAND MLC, SATA 6Gb/s, 2.5-Inch SSD
  • SEAGATE 1TB BarraCuda ST1000DM010, 7200 RPM, SATA 6Gb/s NCQ, 64MB cache, 3.5-Inch HDD
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Comments

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 25,362
    edited December 2020
    The obvious problem is availability.  GeForce RTX 3000 series cards are very scarce.  Ryzen 5000 series CPUs are less scarce, but usually still out of stock.  If that's an OEM build, then make sure that they tell you when it will ship or if they have parts in stock right now.  Because if they have to wait until they can get the parts, the new computer might show up at your house in February.  Or April.

    4000 MHz memory on Zen 3 likely isn't the best idea.  You want the memory clock to match the infinity fabric clock, as if it doesn't, you'd likely increase performance by lowering the memory clock.  The CPUs officially only support up to 3200 MHz memory, though 3600 MHz memory seems to be a safe overclock.  4000 MHz is very hit and miss, and if this is an OEM build, they're probably not going to tinker with the infinity fabric clock speed and make sure it works right for you.

    Why are you getting two SSDs?  And why also a hard drive of the same capacity as an SSD?  If you've got some use case where that makes sense, fine, but it's a strange thing to do.  There's rarely much point to getting a desktop hard drive that is smaller than 2 TB anymore, as you can't make a working hard drive with fewer platters than one, and a smaller capacity platter doesn't make it much cheaper to build.  If you don't need that much capacity, just get an SSD of whatever size you need and be done with it.
    Sandmanjw[Deleted User]
  • CleffyCleffy Member RarePosts: 6,412
    Your PSU is rated about 200w more than you need, and even then I think 800w may still be too much. If you look at PSU efficiency curves, high watt PSUs are less efficient when drawing less power.
    [Deleted User]
  • HorusraHorusra Member EpicPosts: 4,411
    edited December 2020
    thanks for the insights...making modifications.   <3

    As to the delivery date I am not in a rush to get the better parts.  Current 9 year old computer is still putting along with my upgrades, but it is starting to feel the age in what I can upgrade now days.
    [Deleted User]
  • HorusraHorusra Member EpicPosts: 4,411
    Anyone have a suggestion on an Nvidia card that is on par with the 3080
  • HorusraHorusra Member EpicPosts: 4,411
    edited December 2020
    • ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Hero (WI-FI), AMD X570 Chipset, AM4, ATX Motherboard
    • AMD Ryzen™ 5 5600X 6-Core 3.7 - 4.6GHz Turbo, AM4, 65W TDP, Retail Processor
    • EVGA GeForce RTX™ 3080 XC3 GAMING, 1440 - 1710MHz, 10GB GDDR6X, Graphics Card
    • PATRIOT MEMORY 32GB Kit (2 x 16GB) Viper Steel DDR4 3200MHz, CL16, Grey, DIMM Memory
    • EVGA 850 G5, 80 PLUS Gold 850W, ECO Mode, Fully Modular, ATX Power Supply
    • SAMSUNG 1TB 970 EVO Plus 2280, 3500 / 3300 MB/s, V-NAND 3-bit MLC, PCIe 3.0 x4 NVMe, M.2 SSD
    • SAMSUNG 500GB 860 EVO 7mm, 550 / 520 MB/s, V-NAND MLC, SATA 6Gb/s, 2.5-Inch SSD
    • SEAGATE 1TB BarraCuda ST1000DM010, 7200 RPM, SATA 6Gb/s NCQ, 64MB cache, 3.5-Inch HDD
    My reasoning for the HD's is the 500 for windows and wife's basic photo editing, office, etc programs, the 1TB for gaming, and the HDD for the storage of all her photos and video (there is a lot also stored on numerous removable drives....)


    [Deleted User]
  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,383
    edited December 2020
    Horusra said:
    Anyone have a suggestion on an Nvidia card that is on par with the 3080
    The RX 6800XT is the only thing on par, and it's even harder to get than a 3080.

    It's a really, really bad time to be building a computer, unfortunately.

    Your storage is a mess. I can understand trying to save some money and get some capacity. First off - your NVMe drive will almost certainly be your primary - so get your fastest drive here. You have a 1TB Samsung, which is a fine drive.

    But then... a 500G SATA SSD and a 1TB Spinnner? Why bother with either of those? Just get a 2TB NVMe and your almost at the same capacity, for almost the same cost. If you really need capacity, drop the SATA SSD and go for a 8 or 10TB HDD (shucked it would be cheaper than  your 2 drive setup). If you want extra capacity and extra speed on a budget, drop your NVMe down to 500G, and go for a 2TB SATA SSD.

    But your three drive solution right now is kind of all over the place and doesn't make a lot of sense, either price-wise or installation-wise.
    [Deleted User]
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 25,362
    Horusra said:
    Anyone have a suggestion on an Nvidia card that is on par with the 3080
    The Nvidia card on par with an RTX 3080 is the RTX 3080.  Where are you looking to buy stuff from?  Are you going to assemble your own parts?  Or are you looking at some particular site that will assemble it for you and choosing options from that site?
  • VrikaVrika Member LegendaryPosts: 7,892
    edited December 2020
    Horusra said:

    My reasoning for the HD's is the 500 for windows and wife's basic photo editing, office, etc programs, the 1TB for gaming, and the HDD for the storage of all her photos and video (there is a lot also stored on numerous removable drives....)
    Just get a single 2 TB SSD for everything. There are good 2TB NVMe SSDs starting from $200, for example:
      https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1437036-REG/intel_ssdpeknw020t8x1_660p_2tb_ssd_sata.html

    If you want you can then partition that SSD to multiple different drives depending on what you need. It's cheaper than buying 3 separate disks, and you'd get everything on a fast SSD.

    Or alternatively you could get one SSD for OS, games and programs, and then a HDD to store photos and videos. But based on how much money you're spending to the rest of the computer, I'd suggest that only if a single 2TB SSD isn't big enough.
    [Deleted User]Quizzical
     
  • VrikaVrika Member LegendaryPosts: 7,892
    Horusra said:
    Anyone have a suggestion on an Nvidia card that is on par with the 3080
    No GPU currently in stock is on par with RTX 3080. At the moment they're all sold out.

    If you're not in a hurry to buy new computer I'd suggest either:
     a) Place an order for RTX 3080 to some shop that accepts orders on queue and wait patiently, but don't buy anything else until you actually get that GPU because you might end up having to wait for a couple of months. No sense in buying other parts before you can actually get that GPU, or:
     b) Delay building the whole computer for the time being. All the best GPUs are now sold out. You might want to check back in February to see if the stock situation's improved at all
    Horusra
     
  • HorusraHorusra Member EpicPosts: 4,411
    Quizzical said:
    Horusra said:
    Anyone have a suggestion on an Nvidia card that is on par with the 3080
    The Nvidia card on par with an RTX 3080 is the RTX 3080.  Where are you looking to buy stuff from?  Are you going to assemble your own parts?  Or are you looking at some particular site that will assemble it for you and choosing options from that site?
    With kids now days I use a company called AVADirect.  They have made me 2 other custom PC's in the past with no issues and they are good at contact with you about what they are doing and especially if any changes have to be made.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 25,362
    Horusra said:
    Quizzical said:
    Horusra said:
    Anyone have a suggestion on an Nvidia card that is on par with the 3080
    The Nvidia card on par with an RTX 3080 is the RTX 3080.  Where are you looking to buy stuff from?  Are you going to assemble your own parts?  Or are you looking at some particular site that will assemble it for you and choosing options from that site?
    With kids now days I use a company called AVADirect.  They have made me 2 other custom PC's in the past with no issues and they are good at contact with you about what they are doing and especially if any changes have to be made.
    AVA Direct usually has a ton of part choices, so you don't have the excuse of "I picked X because it was the least bad of the three choices they offered".  They list so many parts that I suspect that when you place an order, they go order parts off of New Egg or Amazon or something and then basically charge you to screw them together and ship it to you.  That's different from the common OEM model of offering three choices and commonly having a bunch of each on hand.

    You could contact them and see what availability on an RTX 3080 or Ryzen 5 5600X looks like.  If they tell you that they'll wait to assemble the system until they can find one for sale, but it could be months, then you might decide to wait or not.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 25,362
    Horusra said:
    My reasoning for the HD's is the 500 for windows and wife's basic photo editing, office, etc programs, the 1TB for gaming, and the HDD for the storage of all her photos and video (there is a lot also stored on numerous removable drives....)
    I recommend looking at how much space your wife uses for her photos and videos.  If it's only 100 GB, then just make things easier and stick it on an SSD.  If it's already over 1 TB, then you're not going to be happy with the results of trying to put it all on a 1 TB hard drive.  I think that if you're going to buy a hard drive at all, it should be at least 2 TB.

    For the SSD, I'd just get one SSD of whatever size you need.  That could be 1 TB or 2 TB, but SSDs are so fast that there's really no meaningful performance gains from having more than one.  Putting the OS and programs on different drives was an old hard drive trick to try to partially work around hard drives being really slow.  It's not really applicable to SSDs at all, let alone NVMe over PCI-E SSDs.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 25,362
    I think it's important to understand that Zen 3 and the RTX 3000 and RX 6000 series aren't just new generations of parts.  They're a major step forward on performance.  If you were to wait a year and then buy hardware, then at the high end, the only real difference that waiting a year will have made is that hardware will finally be in stock.  If you get older generation hardware, it will be a lot slower, as the new generations aren't just minor refreshes.

    If your old computer is dying and you absolutely must replace it right now, then go ahead and get older parts.  But if you think the old computer will be fine for a few more months, then I'd wait however long it takes to get the newer hardware.
  • HorusraHorusra Member EpicPosts: 4,411
    Quizzical said:
    Horusra said:
    My reasoning for the HD's is the 500 for windows and wife's basic photo editing, office, etc programs, the 1TB for gaming, and the HDD for the storage of all her photos and video (there is a lot also stored on numerous removable drives....)
    I recommend looking at how much space your wife uses for her photos and videos.  If it's only 100 GB, then just make things easier and stick it on an SSD.  If it's already over 1 TB, then you're not going to be happy with the results of trying to put it all on a 1 TB hard drive.  I think that if you're going to buy a hard drive at all, it should be at least 2 TB.

    For the SSD, I'd just get one SSD of whatever size you need.  That could be 1 TB or 2 TB, but SSDs are so fast that there's really no meaningful performance gains from having more than one.  Putting the OS and programs on different drives was an old hard drive trick to try to partially work around hard drives being really slow.  It's not really applicable to SSDs at all, let alone NVMe over PCI-E SSDs.
    Right now the wife has 380 GB of photos and video..that cover 3 years or her work...plus ~3 TB on about 6 external drives.  She has a problem not removing stuff she does not need, but I lost that argument a long time ago so I just need enough space for her current projects before they get moved to externals for storage.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 25,362
    Horusra said:
    Quizzical said:
    Horusra said:
    My reasoning for the HD's is the 500 for windows and wife's basic photo editing, office, etc programs, the 1TB for gaming, and the HDD for the storage of all her photos and video (there is a lot also stored on numerous removable drives....)
    I recommend looking at how much space your wife uses for her photos and videos.  If it's only 100 GB, then just make things easier and stick it on an SSD.  If it's already over 1 TB, then you're not going to be happy with the results of trying to put it all on a 1 TB hard drive.  I think that if you're going to buy a hard drive at all, it should be at least 2 TB.

    For the SSD, I'd just get one SSD of whatever size you need.  That could be 1 TB or 2 TB, but SSDs are so fast that there's really no meaningful performance gains from having more than one.  Putting the OS and programs on different drives was an old hard drive trick to try to partially work around hard drives being really slow.  It's not really applicable to SSDs at all, let alone NVMe over PCI-E SSDs.
    Right now the wife has 380 GB of photos and video..that cover 3 years or her work...plus ~3 TB on about 6 external drives.  She has a problem not removing stuff she does not need, but I lost that argument a long time ago so I just need enough space for her current projects before they get moved to externals for storage.
    Then get a 4 TB hard drive for her and stop needing to mess with a ton of external drives, at least beyond maybe having one external drive for backup purposes.  Or maybe even a 6 TB hard drive if you want room for her capacity to grow in the future.  A 4 TB hard drive costs under $100, and isn't even all that much more expensive than a 1 TB hard drive.
  • HorusraHorusra Member EpicPosts: 4,411
    Quizzical said:
    Horusra said:
    Quizzical said:
    Horusra said:
    My reasoning for the HD's is the 500 for windows and wife's basic photo editing, office, etc programs, the 1TB for gaming, and the HDD for the storage of all her photos and video (there is a lot also stored on numerous removable drives....)
    I recommend looking at how much space your wife uses for her photos and videos.  If it's only 100 GB, then just make things easier and stick it on an SSD.  If it's already over 1 TB, then you're not going to be happy with the results of trying to put it all on a 1 TB hard drive.  I think that if you're going to buy a hard drive at all, it should be at least 2 TB.

    For the SSD, I'd just get one SSD of whatever size you need.  That could be 1 TB or 2 TB, but SSDs are so fast that there's really no meaningful performance gains from having more than one.  Putting the OS and programs on different drives was an old hard drive trick to try to partially work around hard drives being really slow.  It's not really applicable to SSDs at all, let alone NVMe over PCI-E SSDs.
    Right now the wife has 380 GB of photos and video..that cover 3 years or her work...plus ~3 TB on about 6 external drives.  She has a problem not removing stuff she does not need, but I lost that argument a long time ago so I just need enough space for her current projects before they get moved to externals for storage.
    Then get a 4 TB hard drive for her and stop needing to mess with a ton of external drives, at least beyond maybe having one external drive for backup purposes.  Or maybe even a 6 TB hard drive if you want room for her capacity to grow in the future.  A 4 TB hard drive costs under $100, and isn't even all that much more expensive than a 1 TB hard drive.
    Now you are causing me problems.  >:).  I prefer her using my comp for some more professional editing and her crappy laptop she loves for her sorting and reviewing of her stuff.  If I told her she could have access to all her stuff on my comp I would never get to use it.
  • HorusraHorusra Member EpicPosts: 4,411
    bigmilk said:
    Horusra said:
    Now you are causing me problems.  >:).  I prefer her using my comp for some more professional editing and her crappy laptop she loves for her sorting and reviewing of her stuff.  If I told her she could have access to all her stuff on my comp I would never get to use it.
    Honestly, all your stories sound ridiculous. 

    Why don't you just solve her problem now (she seems to be the one who needs a new computer/laptop, not you) and accept the fact that you probably aren't getting an RTX 3080 any time soon. 

    I do not have to accept the fact...I already stated I am fine with waiting.  Probably take Vrika's advice to wait till Feb and look then.  Now step the fuck off.  How I use my PC and what you do with yours is your business.  I take most people's advice on hardware here seriously, but I also know what options I would like in it. People that can give me a good reason to switch things up I will.  I get the chance at a whole new PC build about every 8 or so years I like to get all the input I can.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 25,362
    Horusra said:
    Quizzical said:
    Horusra said:
    Quizzical said:
    Horusra said:
    My reasoning for the HD's is the 500 for windows and wife's basic photo editing, office, etc programs, the 1TB for gaming, and the HDD for the storage of all her photos and video (there is a lot also stored on numerous removable drives....)
    I recommend looking at how much space your wife uses for her photos and videos.  If it's only 100 GB, then just make things easier and stick it on an SSD.  If it's already over 1 TB, then you're not going to be happy with the results of trying to put it all on a 1 TB hard drive.  I think that if you're going to buy a hard drive at all, it should be at least 2 TB.

    For the SSD, I'd just get one SSD of whatever size you need.  That could be 1 TB or 2 TB, but SSDs are so fast that there's really no meaningful performance gains from having more than one.  Putting the OS and programs on different drives was an old hard drive trick to try to partially work around hard drives being really slow.  It's not really applicable to SSDs at all, let alone NVMe over PCI-E SSDs.
    Right now the wife has 380 GB of photos and video..that cover 3 years or her work...plus ~3 TB on about 6 external drives.  She has a problem not removing stuff she does not need, but I lost that argument a long time ago so I just need enough space for her current projects before they get moved to externals for storage.
    Then get a 4 TB hard drive for her and stop needing to mess with a ton of external drives, at least beyond maybe having one external drive for backup purposes.  Or maybe even a 6 TB hard drive if you want room for her capacity to grow in the future.  A 4 TB hard drive costs under $100, and isn't even all that much more expensive than a 1 TB hard drive.
    Now you are causing me problems.  >:).  I prefer her using my comp for some more professional editing and her crappy laptop she loves for her sorting and reviewing of her stuff.  If I told her she could have access to all her stuff on my comp I would never get to use it.
    It sounds like what she really needs is a NAS.  Get a 2-bay NAS and put two 6 TB hard drives in there in RAID 1 and now all her stuff is readily accessible from either computer, without having to manually copy it back and forth.  That means no more messing with external media.  RAID 1 even means you have automatic backup, so that if a hard drive dies entirely, she still has all her files.
  • HorusraHorusra Member EpicPosts: 4,411
    Quizzical said:
    Horusra said:
    Quizzical said:
    Horusra said:
    Quizzical said:
    Horusra said:
    My reasoning for the HD's is the 500 for windows and wife's basic photo editing, office, etc programs, the 1TB for gaming, and the HDD for the storage of all her photos and video (there is a lot also stored on numerous removable drives....)
    I recommend looking at how much space your wife uses for her photos and videos.  If it's only 100 GB, then just make things easier and stick it on an SSD.  If it's already over 1 TB, then you're not going to be happy with the results of trying to put it all on a 1 TB hard drive.  I think that if you're going to buy a hard drive at all, it should be at least 2 TB.

    For the SSD, I'd just get one SSD of whatever size you need.  That could be 1 TB or 2 TB, but SSDs are so fast that there's really no meaningful performance gains from having more than one.  Putting the OS and programs on different drives was an old hard drive trick to try to partially work around hard drives being really slow.  It's not really applicable to SSDs at all, let alone NVMe over PCI-E SSDs.
    Right now the wife has 380 GB of photos and video..that cover 3 years or her work...plus ~3 TB on about 6 external drives.  She has a problem not removing stuff she does not need, but I lost that argument a long time ago so I just need enough space for her current projects before they get moved to externals for storage.
    Then get a 4 TB hard drive for her and stop needing to mess with a ton of external drives, at least beyond maybe having one external drive for backup purposes.  Or maybe even a 6 TB hard drive if you want room for her capacity to grow in the future.  A 4 TB hard drive costs under $100, and isn't even all that much more expensive than a 1 TB hard drive.
    Now you are causing me problems.  >:).  I prefer her using my comp for some more professional editing and her crappy laptop she loves for her sorting and reviewing of her stuff.  If I told her she could have access to all her stuff on my comp I would never get to use it.
    It sounds like what she really needs is a NAS.  Get a 2-bay NAS and put two 6 TB hard drives in there in RAID 1 and now all her stuff is readily accessible from either computer, without having to manually copy it back and forth.  That means no more messing with external media.  RAID 1 even means you have automatic backup, so that if a hard drive dies entirely, she still has all her files.
    Not familiar with those.  This is old school but are those like old data tape reader slots for storage?
  • HorusraHorusra Member EpicPosts: 4,411
    Is there any good reason besides having to possibly having to reinstall windows and possibly wipe a drive if I get a card with two M.2 slot to have a 250 one for the operating system and another larger for gaming?
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 25,362
    Horusra said:
    Is there any good reason besides having to possibly having to reinstall windows and possibly wipe a drive if I get a card with two M.2 slot to have a 250 one for the operating system and another larger for gaming?
    For consumer use, there is rarely any good reason to buy a desktop or laptop with two SSDs in it.  The main reason to end up with two SSDs is that you buy a computer with one, then later decide you need more storage and add the other.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 25,362
    Horusra said:
    Quizzical said:
    Horusra said:
    Now you are causing me problems.  >:).  I prefer her using my comp for some more professional editing and her crappy laptop she loves for her sorting and reviewing of her stuff.  If I told her she could have access to all her stuff on my comp I would never get to use it.
    It sounds like what she really needs is a NAS.  Get a 2-bay NAS and put two 6 TB hard drives in there in RAID 1 and now all her stuff is readily accessible from either computer, without having to manually copy it back and forth.  That means no more messing with external media.  RAID 1 even means you have automatic backup, so that if a hard drive dies entirely, she still has all her files.
    Not familiar with those.  This is old school but are those like old data tape reader slots for storage?
    A NAS is Network Attached Storage, and does what the name says.  The idea of a NAS is that it's a box with hard drives in it that you plug in to your router, probably via an ethernet cable.  Any computer on your network can then freely access the files stored on the hard drives in the NAS.  Rather than putting the data in your computer or in her computer, you put it in a place that both can easily access it.  Files written by one computer can be read by the other, without having to manually transfer data, as both have access to the hard drives where the files are physically stored.

    Since the NAS is attached to your network, you can only access it at the speed of your network, likely around 100 MB/s for gigabit ethernet, or likely slower over WiFi.  But for bulk data storage, that's plenty fast enough.

    You can get a NAS with a single bay, and then if the hard drive dies, the data is gone.  That's fine for things where you wouldn't be particularly upset if you lost the data.  But if your wife is using it for professional purposes, you probably don't want to lose the data.  The idea of a 2-bay NAS in RAID 1 is that whenever you write some data to the NAS, it gets physically written to both of the drives.  That way, if either drive fails, you still have all of the data on the other drive.  You only lose data if the second drive also fails before you replace the first--which means that if one drive fails, you should get a replacement quickly, even if from your wife's perspective, it looks like it's still working just fine.

    To get a 2-bay NAS and two 6 GB hard drives, you'd be looking at around $400-$500.  Because the same data gets written to both hard drives, you'd have 6 GB of storage available, not 12 GB.  But it's not just for the convenience of being able to access the data from either computer.  It's also important to consider what happens if a hard drive fails.  How much would it cost you to lose all of that data?  A 1-bay NAS and a single hard drive would be a lot cheaper, but give you no redundancy.
    Horusra
  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,383
    edited December 2020
    Horusra said:
    Is there any good reason besides having to possibly having to reinstall windows and possibly wipe a drive if I get a card with two M.2 slot to have a 250 one for the operating system and another larger for gaming?
    I like having my OS one one drive, and my games on a second. My "games" drive has migrated across three or four builds now -- it's not the same physical drive, but through upgrades on various things, I've kept it physically separate from my OS drive.

    Are there advantages to that? With SSDs, not a lot apart from mostly habit for me. With HDDs it made a noticeable difference in load times, and it makes it easy for things like installing Windows -- the Games drive is mostly ready to go once Windows is back up. But re-installing Windows is now a once-per-computer-build event, not the once-a-year maintenance chore it used to be.

    Also, just to be contrary...  I am in the process of building a computer with 2 SSDs. The OS is going on a NVMe 1 TB, the "games" on a SATA 2TB. I wanted a bit more cushion than 2TB, but didn't need a massive amount of storage on this build. The reason I went with 2 SSDs it was much cheaper than a single 4TB drive (they don't really have 3TB SSDs), and the SATA drive was about $20 less than a NVMe for what I'm using as semi-bulk storage. The budget worked let me squeeze in a bit of an upgrade elsewhere over the cost of a 4TB NVMe. I could have gotten a 6TB HDD for about the same price as the 2 TB SATA... but decided to go all solid state in this build, and if/when it runs out of room, I can re-evaluate at that time and see what makes sense then.

    The only bad thing about that new build is... I have to recycle an older video card for the time being, since I am not playing the race-the-bot game on GPU, it's like the old days of camping a rare spawn in EQ. I'll just wait until I can find one on sale, and the computer will run with an older GPU I happen to already have until then.

    Also - NAS... godlike piece of hardware to have around the house. I have an older 4-bay Synology and use mine for cross-system storage (like Quiz describes), as well as acting as my Plex server, Time Machine backups for my work computer, a server for my IP Cameras, and a few other odds and ends. It's basically a stripped down Linux computer that just holds hard drives, with a pretty slick web-based interface that lets you do stuff with it without needing to learn Linux.

    Get a two-bay NAS (I recommend Synology or QNAP) and be a hero to the Wife.
    Horusra
  • HorusraHorusra Member EpicPosts: 4,411
    Well NAS Is a must it seems.  

    Last question is the life span of the new M.2 SSD the same as the standard ones?  Besides higher price any reason, like them not seeming to be a tech going forward, to stay way from them?
  • VrikaVrika Member LegendaryPosts: 7,892
    edited December 2020
    Horusra said:
    Well NAS Is a must it seems.  

    Last question is the life span of the new M.2 SSD the same as the standard ones?  Besides higher price any reason, like them not seeming to be a tech going forward, to stay way from them?
    The difference is that M.2 slot supports both NVMe transfer protocol and SATA tranfer protocol. The old large form factor SSDs are always using SATA for transfer, and SATA can't transfer more than 560 MB/s. Whereas those new small M.2 drives that use NVMe transfer can sometimes reach much higher speeds - for example the 1 TB Samsung you were thinking about was rated up to 3 500 MB/s.

    I don't know if that Samsung's 3 500 MB/s is worth the extra price, but there are NVMe drives that offer around 2 000 MB/s available at around $100 for 1 TB or $200 for 2 TB, and the price difference between those and cheapest SATA drivers is so small that you should pay the small extra for the extra speed they offer.

    There's no difference in life span between M.2/NVMe/SATA.

    EDIT: As long as you have free M.2 slots available on the motherboard there's no reason why you should stay away from them. 
    Horusra
     
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