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Are mmorpgs boring?

AmatheAmathe Member LegendaryPosts: 7,630
This may seem an odd question, since I have played many mmorpgs and thought I enjoyed them.

But did I?

Or did I just jump on a progression treadmill and keep going because it was vaguely satisfying?

 What I most wanted was the sense of awe and wonder I found in EQ. Every game had some of that, but increasingly less over time.

Mostly I ended up doing a bunch of tasks, expecting the fun would come later when I was higher level. And it mostly never did.

I am having some self doubt. I need a new and better fix.

EQ1, EQ2, SWG, SWTOR, GW, GW2 CoH, CoV, FFXI, WoW, CO, War,TSW and a slew of free trials and beta tests

blueturtle13AlBQuirkyAmaranthariixviiiixkitaradxpsynccameltosisMendelPhaserlight
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Comments

  • blueturtle13blueturtle13 Member LegendaryPosts: 12,788
    I was personally never in 'awe' of the genre.

    I felt the online component was a welcome change to being able to play RPGs in a new way than I did before Lineage. 
    Asheron's was a big shift for me, I played EQ2 for years and currently play FF14 because I have friends that wanted me to join them but nothing ever really took the place of the in person pen and paper sessions that many CRPGs/MMORPGs looked to replicate. (or supplant) 

    I feel the genre is just tired and needs a reimagining yet I really don't see that happening until we see a technological shift that allows for a role playing game to be experienced with others in a new way never before seen.

    There will be little bumps in playerbases in some games here and there but a real shift for the genre, I feel, will be driven by a technology and not a game. 


     
       
    Amathe[Deleted User]AlBQuirkyKyleranimmodiumxpsyncstrawhat0981Mendellaserit

    거북이는 목을 내밀 때 안 움직입니다












  • AlBQuirkyAlBQuirky Member EpicPosts: 6,707
    edited August 2020
    EQ was my intro to the genre, too. I was seeking something close to the pen and paper TTRPGs I enjoyed with my friends before we all went our separate ways. Sadly, MMORPGs never made that replacement, but I was enamored for awhile.

    With EQ, I was amazed that I was playing the game in Nebraska while another in my groups was in Denmark, and yet another player was in Japan.

    Looking back, though, none of the MMORPGs I played were exceptional games nor exciting, per se. I played because of the other players, not any mechanic or feature. EQ was fun in spite of being EQ. City of Heroes was fun in spite of being City of Heroes. It was the players that kept me playing and paying.

    If you break the games down, they are just one big treadmill. What they offer, though, is a huge variety in how your journey takes shape. This comes from the unpredictability of us human beings :)

    To be honest, what I look for now in an MMO is not a bunch of features, but how the game "encourages" playing with other people. This is where the genre is truly lacking right now.
    Amathe[Deleted User]AmaranthartzervoimmodiumkitaradSharnexpsyncTheocritusNyghthowlerand 1 other.

    - Al

    Personally the only modern MMORPG trend that annoys me is the idea that MMOs need to be designed in a way to attract people who don't actually like MMOs. Which to me makes about as much sense as someone trying to figure out a way to get vegetarians to eat at their steakhouse.
    - FARGIN_WAR


  • KyleranKyleran Member LegendaryPosts: 37,540
    AlBQuirky said:


    To be honest, what I look for now in an MMO is not a bunch of features, but how the game "encourages" playing with other people. This is where the genre is truly lacking right now.
    Believe it or not, Bethesda has done an awesome job turning FO76 into an extremely social experience where the rewards for being in a full group means players readily join in random teams.

    Coupled with great flexibility to chat in team, or in the world, or totally mute your team mates if desired there's no reason to ever be not in a group.

    I'm rolling nightly with a crew of 5 or 6 regulars  and we chat it up with random joiners on a regular basis.



    AmathexpsyncAlBQuirkyPhaserlight

    "See normal people, I'm not one of them" | G-Easy & Big Sean

    "I need to finish" - Christian Wolff: The Accountant

    Just trying to live long enough to play a new, released MMORPG, playing FO76 at the moment.

    Fools find no pleasure in understanding, but delight in airing their own opinions. Pvbs 18:2, NIV

    Don't just play games, inhabit virtual worlds™

    "This is the most intelligent, well qualified and articulate response to a post I have ever seen on these forums. It's a shame most people here won't have the attention span to read past the second line." - Anon






  • TwistedSister77TwistedSister77 Member RarePosts: 757
    Nah, join a good guild do what you enjoy.  PVP for me is particularly fun and challenging... as long as your doing it for fun and not grinding.
    AlBQuirkyPhaserlight
  • AmarantharAmaranthar Member EpicPosts: 4,387
    Maybe those of you who never played UO are at a disadvantage in understanding what's missing in MMORPGs these days. 
    I guess it's harder to explain than I thought, as much as I tried over the years. 

    Now don't get me wrong, the rampant PKing was very bad. But other than that...
    UO felt like a living world. 
    It was very social, and very much a simulated world. It had a lot of options that pretty much meant it had "something for everyone." 
    It allowed for your imagination to see it as a world, not a game with features. 

    My suggestion in your quest for a new fix is to explore what made UO that way. 

    Understand this, too. UO ran on less processing power than an Apple Watch. 
    Imagine what can be done today. 
    AlBQuirky

    Once upon a time....

  • iixviiiixiixviiiix Member RarePosts: 2,223
    For me , the best moments in MMORPG was when i used them as chat tool and not the game . Cause chat box and player drama is only thing that player are freely to create contents .

    New MMORPG offer us manything new that old MMORPG lacked but one thing "players interactive".

    Sometime , simple is the best . Nowaday , i hardly able to use all the features that new MMORPG offer , there are too many yet i only use the basic .


    AlBQuirkyPhaserlight
  • DeadSpockDeadSpock Member UncommonPosts: 403
    They are washed out compared to single player rpg, but FFXIV which has all the story and cutscenes and more what single player rpg offer. I was feeling the same like you until I decided to start 14 from scratch and watch all cutscenes read all text and I'm on the 2nd expac now having a ball. Secret is dont rush to endgame but enjoy the journey, and yes at endgame 14 is boring like all the other mmorpg.
    AmatheKyleraniixviiiixAlBQuirky
  • AmarantharAmaranthar Member EpicPosts: 4,387
    remsleep said:
    Maybe those of you who never played UO are at a disadvantage in understanding what's missing in MMORPGs these days. 
    I guess it's harder to explain than I thought, as much as I tried over the years. 

    Now don't get me wrong, the rampant PKing was very bad. But other than that...
    UO felt like a living world. 
    It was very social, and very much a simulated world. It had a lot of options that pretty much meant it had "something for everyone." 
    It allowed for your imagination to see it as a world, not a game with features. 

    My suggestion in your quest for a new fix is to explore what made UO that way. 

    Understand this, too. UO ran on less processing power than an Apple Watch. 
    Imagine what can be done today. 


    We can do a lot more with tech today - what we can't do is recreate the playerbase we had in 1998/99 - MMOs were pretty much only accessible to RPG loving PC geeks - that for the most part were awesome online people.

    So this made MMORPGs available to a very defined and unifed audience - there were no console players, no smartphones, internet access was still not widespread.

    Today MMORPGs are widely accessible to all - so with wide accessibility - you get a a very wide playerbase that is way more diverse and doesn't have a common identity like it was circa 1998-2004
    I don't believe that. 

    First of all, computers had already become widespread in use a couple of years before UO released. There were a lot more rural areas that didn't have service, but they were out there in the big boom of computers. 

    Secondly, people are people, and you have about the same percentages of this type and that type in every "class" of people. 

    I've heard this take (your post) before, too. It's just part of the PR that's tried to manage what games people think are viable. PR from the "Clone" companies that's been dished out and unfortunately accepted as truth. 
    Phaserlight

    Once upon a time....

  • lahnmirlahnmir Member LegendaryPosts: 4,244
    remsleep said:
    Maybe those of you who never played UO are at a disadvantage in understanding what's missing in MMORPGs these days. 
    I guess it's harder to explain than I thought, as much as I tried over the years. 

    Now don't get me wrong, the rampant PKing was very bad. But other than that...
    UO felt like a living world. 
    It was very social, and very much a simulated world. It had a lot of options that pretty much meant it had "something for everyone." 
    It allowed for your imagination to see it as a world, not a game with features. 

    My suggestion in your quest for a new fix is to explore what made UO that way. 

    Understand this, too. UO ran on less processing power than an Apple Watch. 
    Imagine what can be done today. 


    We can do a lot more with tech today - what we can't do is recreate the playerbase we had in 1998/99 - MMOs were pretty much only accessible to RPG loving PC geeks - that for the most part were awesome online people.

    So this made MMORPGs available to a very defined and unifed audience - there were no console players, no smartphones, internet access was still not widespread.

    Today MMORPGs are widely accessible to all - so with wide accessibility - you get a a very wide playerbase that is way more diverse and doesn't have a common identity like it was circa 1998-2004
    I don't believe that. 

    First of all, computers had already become widespread in use a couple of years before UO released. There were a lot more rural areas that didn't have service, but they were out there in the big boom of computers. 

    Secondly, people are people, and you have about the same percentages of this type and that type in every "class" of people. 

    I've heard this take (your post) before, too. It's just part of the PR that's tried to manage what games people think are viable. PR from the "Clone" companies that's been dished out and unfortunately accepted as truth. 
    Its only partly true. What is true is that that reasoning gave these players a sense of exclusiveness, of being and feeling special because they were experiencing something unique and niche. Then the doors blew wide open and every man and his dog started playing MMORPGs. And ”poof” gone was that special feeling. They were always a grind, they weren’t all that much better back in the day (although more original since the genre was new), they just made you feel more special.

    That is why people cry WoW ruined the genre, that they cater to dumb people etc. But in reality its not about others, its really about them.

    /Cheers,
    Lahnmir
    tzervoAlBQuirkyMendel
    'the only way he could nail it any better is if he used a cross.'

    Kyleran on yours sincerely 


    'But there are many. You can play them entirely solo, and even offline. Also, you are wrong by default.'

    Ikcin in response to yours sincerely debating whether or not single-player offline MMOs exist...



    'This does not apply just to ED but SC or any other game. What they will get is Rebirth/X4, likely prettier but equally underwhelming and pointless. 

    It is incredibly difficult to design some meaningfull leg content that would fit a space ship game - simply because it is not a leg game.

    It is just huge resource waste....'

    Gdemami absolutely not being an armchair developer

  • AmarantharAmaranthar Member EpicPosts: 4,387
    lahnmir said:
    remsleep said:
    Maybe those of you who never played UO are at a disadvantage in understanding what's missing in MMORPGs these days. 
    I guess it's harder to explain than I thought, as much as I tried over the years. 

    Now don't get me wrong, the rampant PKing was very bad. But other than that...
    UO felt like a living world. 
    It was very social, and very much a simulated world. It had a lot of options that pretty much meant it had "something for everyone." 
    It allowed for your imagination to see it as a world, not a game with features. 

    My suggestion in your quest for a new fix is to explore what made UO that way. 

    Understand this, too. UO ran on less processing power than an Apple Watch. 
    Imagine what can be done today. 


    We can do a lot more with tech today - what we can't do is recreate the playerbase we had in 1998/99 - MMOs were pretty much only accessible to RPG loving PC geeks - that for the most part were awesome online people.

    So this made MMORPGs available to a very defined and unifed audience - there were no console players, no smartphones, internet access was still not widespread.

    Today MMORPGs are widely accessible to all - so with wide accessibility - you get a a very wide playerbase that is way more diverse and doesn't have a common identity like it was circa 1998-2004
    I don't believe that. 

    First of all, computers had already become widespread in use a couple of years before UO released. There were a lot more rural areas that didn't have service, but they were out there in the big boom of computers. 

    Secondly, people are people, and you have about the same percentages of this type and that type in every "class" of people. 

    I've heard this take (your post) before, too. It's just part of the PR that's tried to manage what games people think are viable. PR from the "Clone" companies that's been dished out and unfortunately accepted as truth. 
    Its only partly true. What is true is that that reasoning gave these players a sense of exclusiveness, of being and feeling special because they were experiencing something unique and niche. Then the doors blew wide open and every man and his dog started playing MMORPGs. And ”poof” gone was that special feeling. They were always a grind, they weren’t all that much better back in the day (although more original since the genre was new), they just made you feel more special.

    That is why people cry WoW ruined the genre, that they cater to dumb people etc. But in reality its not about others, its really about them.

    /Cheers,
    Lahnmir
    I don't know where you're coming from with this. Is it "Roleplayers", you don't like them? 
    Not everyone in UO was a RPer, most weren't. But it was a non-issue for most. 


    Once upon a time....

  • AmarantharAmaranthar Member EpicPosts: 4,387
    edited August 2020
    remsleep said:
    lahnmir said:
    remsleep said:
    Maybe those of you who never played UO are at a disadvantage in understanding what's missing in MMORPGs these days. 
    I guess it's harder to explain than I thought, as much as I tried over the years. 

    Now don't get me wrong, the rampant PKing was very bad. But other than that...
    UO felt like a living world. 
    It was very social, and very much a simulated world. It had a lot of options that pretty much meant it had "something for everyone." 
    It allowed for your imagination to see it as a world, not a game with features. 

    My suggestion in your quest for a new fix is to explore what made UO that way. 

    Understand this, too. UO ran on less processing power than an Apple Watch. 
    Imagine what can be done today. 


    We can do a lot more with tech today - what we can't do is recreate the playerbase we had in 1998/99 - MMOs were pretty much only accessible to RPG loving PC geeks - that for the most part were awesome online people.

    So this made MMORPGs available to a very defined and unifed audience - there were no console players, no smartphones, internet access was still not widespread.

    Today MMORPGs are widely accessible to all - so with wide accessibility - you get a a very wide playerbase that is way more diverse and doesn't have a common identity like it was circa 1998-2004
    I don't believe that. 

    First of all, computers had already become widespread in use a couple of years before UO released. There were a lot more rural areas that didn't have service, but they were out there in the big boom of computers. 

    Secondly, people are people, and you have about the same percentages of this type and that type in every "class" of people. 

    I've heard this take (your post) before, too. It's just part of the PR that's tried to manage what games people think are viable. PR from the "Clone" companies that's been dished out and unfortunately accepted as truth. 
    Its only partly true. What is true is that that reasoning gave these players a sense of exclusiveness, of being and feeling special because they were experiencing something unique and niche. Then the doors blew wide open and every man and his dog started playing MMORPGs. And ”poof” gone was that special feeling. They were always a grind, they weren’t all that much better back in the day (although more original since the genre was new), they just made you feel more special.

    That is why people cry WoW ruined the genre, that they cater to dumb people etc. But in reality its not about others, its really about them.

    /Cheers,
    Lahnmir

    While this is partially true (feeling special part) - that's a bit of a tangent and different point that was being discussed.

    The main point  that I brought up is  - early mmorpg playerbase was comprised of players that shared a lot more common interests and a lot more common identity than your general playerbase today, which is a lot more diverse.


    You mean like today's gamers who loved the LOTR's movies? 
    Do you think they are really different than D&Ders were? 
    I don't think so, and I stick to my point that people are people and not really any different than anyone else, in the overall scheme of things. 

    By the way, from my little corner of the D&D experience, I see much in common with today's gamers. 
    Reference the "Monte Hall" campaigns.  B)
    AlBQuirky

    Once upon a time....

  • lahnmirlahnmir Member LegendaryPosts: 4,244
    lahnmir said:
    remsleep said:
    Maybe those of you who never played UO are at a disadvantage in understanding what's missing in MMORPGs these days. 
    I guess it's harder to explain than I thought, as much as I tried over the years. 

    Now don't get me wrong, the rampant PKing was very bad. But other than that...
    UO felt like a living world. 
    It was very social, and very much a simulated world. It had a lot of options that pretty much meant it had "something for everyone." 
    It allowed for your imagination to see it as a world, not a game with features. 

    My suggestion in your quest for a new fix is to explore what made UO that way. 

    Understand this, too. UO ran on less processing power than an Apple Watch. 
    Imagine what can be done today. 


    We can do a lot more with tech today - what we can't do is recreate the playerbase we had in 1998/99 - MMOs were pretty much only accessible to RPG loving PC geeks - that for the most part were awesome online people.

    So this made MMORPGs available to a very defined and unifed audience - there were no console players, no smartphones, internet access was still not widespread.

    Today MMORPGs are widely accessible to all - so with wide accessibility - you get a a very wide playerbase that is way more diverse and doesn't have a common identity like it was circa 1998-2004
    I don't believe that. 

    First of all, computers had already become widespread in use a couple of years before UO released. There were a lot more rural areas that didn't have service, but they were out there in the big boom of computers. 

    Secondly, people are people, and you have about the same percentages of this type and that type in every "class" of people. 

    I've heard this take (your post) before, too. It's just part of the PR that's tried to manage what games people think are viable. PR from the "Clone" companies that's been dished out and unfortunately accepted as truth. 
    Its only partly true. What is true is that that reasoning gave these players a sense of exclusiveness, of being and feeling special because they were experiencing something unique and niche. Then the doors blew wide open and every man and his dog started playing MMORPGs. And ”poof” gone was that special feeling. They were always a grind, they weren’t all that much better back in the day (although more original since the genre was new), they just made you feel more special.

    That is why people cry WoW ruined the genre, that they cater to dumb people etc. But in reality its not about others, its really about them.

    /Cheers,
    Lahnmir
    I don't know where you're coming from with this. Is it "Roleplayers", you don't like them? 
    Not everyone in UO was a RPer, most weren't. But it was a non-issue for most. 


    No, not at all. What I am saying is that it was the players, not the games, that made the difference. I love RP btw.

    The players were a close knitted bunch and felt special in the niche genre. Then the genre became mainstream and older players blamed newer games while the real change was in the population. Not because it became worse, but because it became normal instead of niche and took that special feeling away.

    Remsleep has a good point about more diversity in the playerbase too, it is a side effect of a genre blowing up. 

    And yes, it wad a bit of a side comment, I know;)

    /Cheers,
    Lahnmir
    AlBQuirky
    'the only way he could nail it any better is if he used a cross.'

    Kyleran on yours sincerely 


    'But there are many. You can play them entirely solo, and even offline. Also, you are wrong by default.'

    Ikcin in response to yours sincerely debating whether or not single-player offline MMOs exist...



    'This does not apply just to ED but SC or any other game. What they will get is Rebirth/X4, likely prettier but equally underwhelming and pointless. 

    It is incredibly difficult to design some meaningfull leg content that would fit a space ship game - simply because it is not a leg game.

    It is just huge resource waste....'

    Gdemami absolutely not being an armchair developer

  • AmarantharAmaranthar Member EpicPosts: 4,387
    edited August 2020
    lahnmir said:
    lahnmir said:
    remsleep said:
    Maybe those of you who never played UO are at a disadvantage in understanding what's missing in MMORPGs these days. 
    I guess it's harder to explain than I thought, as much as I tried over the years. 

    Now don't get me wrong, the rampant PKing was very bad. But other than that...
    UO felt like a living world. 
    It was very social, and very much a simulated world. It had a lot of options that pretty much meant it had "something for everyone." 
    It allowed for your imagination to see it as a world, not a game with features. 

    My suggestion in your quest for a new fix is to explore what made UO that way. 

    Understand this, too. UO ran on less processing power than an Apple Watch. 
    Imagine what can be done today. 


    We can do a lot more with tech today - what we can't do is recreate the playerbase we had in 1998/99 - MMOs were pretty much only accessible to RPG loving PC geeks - that for the most part were awesome online people.

    So this made MMORPGs available to a very defined and unifed audience - there were no console players, no smartphones, internet access was still not widespread.

    Today MMORPGs are widely accessible to all - so with wide accessibility - you get a a very wide playerbase that is way more diverse and doesn't have a common identity like it was circa 1998-2004
    I don't believe that. 

    First of all, computers had already become widespread in use a couple of years before UO released. There were a lot more rural areas that didn't have service, but they were out there in the big boom of computers. 

    Secondly, people are people, and you have about the same percentages of this type and that type in every "class" of people. 

    I've heard this take (your post) before, too. It's just part of the PR that's tried to manage what games people think are viable. PR from the "Clone" companies that's been dished out and unfortunately accepted as truth. 
    Its only partly true. What is true is that that reasoning gave these players a sense of exclusiveness, of being and feeling special because they were experiencing something unique and niche. Then the doors blew wide open and every man and his dog started playing MMORPGs. And ”poof” gone was that special feeling. They were always a grind, they weren’t all that much better back in the day (although more original since the genre was new), they just made you feel more special.

    That is why people cry WoW ruined the genre, that they cater to dumb people etc. But in reality its not about others, its really about them.

    /Cheers,
    Lahnmir
    I don't know where you're coming from with this. Is it "Roleplayers", you don't like them? 
    Not everyone in UO was a RPer, most weren't. But it was a non-issue for most. 


    No, not at all. What I am saying is that it was the players, not the games, that made the difference. I love RP btw.

    The players were a close knitted bunch and felt special in the niche genre. Then the genre became mainstream and older players blamed newer games while the real change was in the population. Not because it became worse, but because it became normal instead of niche and took that special feeling away.

    Remsleep has a good point about more diversity in the playerbase too, it is a side effect of a genre blowing up. 

    And yes, it wad a bit of a side comment, I know;)

    /Cheers,
    Lahnmir
    Ok, so lets take a look at that. 

    In UO, the Power Gaps were much lower. 
    So Guilds stayed together, because there was nothing, design wise, to cause players to leave. Players got to know each other because of this consistency. 
    Add to that an assortment of Player-Cooperative efforts, like fairs, because there were no auction houses, and in the earliest days there weren't even the Player Vendors at their houses. So players organized fairs where things could be sold (players also hawked their goods at the banks), offer gear repairs, and even set up trade deals.
    -"Get me all the reagents you can get, I'll pay you 3 gold each, meet me every Friday night at Brit Bank." 
    --or--
    -"Make me 3 full sets of plate armor of power rank, and meet me at Trinsic Bank West." 

    And loosely, trade associations (for lack of a better word) formed. Even among guilds, as they ran joint efforts. 

    Players often helped others out in dungeons, resing them and helping them get their gear and loot back (even the MOBs looted you). People tend to remember people who do that for you. 

    And players got to know each other, even if not in a guild together. 


    In the Clones of Level Grinds, it's a different story for most players, and this is why the "solo effect" has taken hold. 
    In those games, the Power Gaps divide players. Unless you are in a guild with the same players playing together all the time, where no one falls behind in the level groupings. Mostly players have no one to play with most of the time because they fell into a level range with no one else to play with, so they leave said guild. 
    No bonds are formed. No friendships made. No associations, no glue. 

    But then there's LFG, grouping on the fly. And again, unless you play equally with a group of the same players, which is uncommon (I offer the "solo effect" as evidence), the same thing happens. No bonds formed. 

    I noticed that most players that I ran a few quests with on one night, didn't even remember me the next. Why bother when you're going to be separated anyways. 

    So it is, most definitely, the games and not the players. 

    Once upon a time....

  • ScotScot Member LegendaryPosts: 14,881
    edited August 2020
    Not everyone back then was into roleplaying, many just liked the idea of a multiplayer game. In the same way multiplayer FPS were all about the multiplayer.

    So I am not sure about the idea of enjoying the exclusivity; for the role players yes, but remember they were trying to get any roleplayers they knew online. For those who were just there for multiplayer, the more the merrier.

    That became a side show once the solo gamers, then the console players then the smartphone "players" became the biggest player base. Now mobile players are the biggest player base in gaming, the baulk of whom had never bothered with a game before, well I am not sure gaming let alone MMO's can ever recover from that. But the ££'s and $$'s keep coming in so everything must be alright. :p
    tzervoxpsyncAlBQuirky

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  • kitaradkitarad Member LegendaryPosts: 6,465
    I don't know @Amathe but it feels that many games are not engaging enough and I have to make an effort and sometimes Herculean at that to get interested. However once it gets going and I have to confess I have forced it sometimes, it becomes a little better.

    You must think I am a being silly trying so hard but a lot of games cannot grab me like Everquest and the last game that did that was FFXI. 

    What you're talking about is an effortless transition in playing where you are immediately in the world. I don't know whether it will ever happen again. Have we played too many games for it to happen?
    AmatheAlBQuirky

  • cheyanecheyane Member LegendaryPosts: 7,848
    AlBQuirky said:
    EQ was my intro to the genre, too. I was seeking something close to the pen and paper TTRPGs I enjoyed with my friends before we all went our separate ways. Sadly, MMORPGs never made that replacement, but I was enamored for awhile.

    With EQ, I was amazed that I was playing the game in Nebraska while another in my groups was in Denmark, and yet another player was in Japan.

    Looking back, though, none of the MMORPGs I played were exceptional games nor exciting, per se. I played because of the other players, not any mechanic or feature. EQ was fun in spite of being EQ. City of Heroes was fun in spite of being City of Heroes. It was the players that kept me playing and paying.

    If you break the games down, they are just one big treadmill. What they offer, though, is a huge variety in how your journey takes shape. This comes from the unpredictability of us human beings :)

    To be honest, what I look for now in an MMO is not a bunch of features, but how the game "encourages" playing with other people. This is where the genre is truly lacking right now.
    I had a different experience in Everquest because I only started grouping seriously at around level 9 and basically never stopped after that.

    Initially since it was essentially my second PC game so I was totally green to PC gaming I was completely overwhelmed and lost. I made several characters and I lost a few to the brutal world and even gave up and started in other starting areas after Toxxulia swallowed a few corpses to never give them up again. I drowned in that well in Qeynos trying to find my guild. I got completely lost in that tunnel in Surefall Glade, I was convinced I was never going to find my way out (human blind as a bat). The list goes on and compounded by the fact that I didn't know how to chat at all. Someone finally realised that and sent me a tell explaining how to step by step.

    I chose really, really bad places and then I landed outside Felwithe. Then things changed and I began to enjoy myself. Probably because I was finally getting the hang of the world after a few lost characters and experiences.

    I do agree grouping was fabulously fun once I started doing it and I become so invested in my character and doing my best. I fell in love with people and they became my focus and my whole gaming world in Everquest revolved around them. Grouping was truly what saved me. I might have left the game had I not discovered it but I won't know that for sure though.

    All the other MMORPGs I played after Everquest that I played happily and had fun all involved a lot of grouping like City of Heroes, Anarchy Online and FFXI.

    I didn't really answer the topic though. I guess it depends on the game. 
    AmatheScotxpsyncAlBQuirky
    Chamber of Chains
  • kitaradkitarad Member LegendaryPosts: 6,465
    I think when raiding becomes routine is when things become boring. When there isn't much excitement left.

    However if you have some other aspect of the game that keeps you engaged it can mean that you would log on for that too. Like housing or collecting something, can be anything but something that is engaging enough to keep you coming back. 

    It's based on personal interests in the end. Some people hate housing and others play a game solely for that. So what overcomes the usual boredom that sets in inevitably can be cured.
    AmathexpsyncAmarantharAlBQuirky

  • UngoodUngood Member LegendaryPosts: 5,563
    For me, the more on rails the game is, the less it is attractive.

    I like a game that I can just "Go and Do" and not need to follow a direct story, or have to follow the predefined script to the end.

    In fact, if the Tutorial can't be done in about an hour, I get really just so done with the game.

    This is what made games like EQ, so great. You had freedom to progress as you want. You could get involved in the story, you could do the side quests, you could work favor, you could just camp a spot and grind levels, you could quest after gear, there was no one telling you how you had to play the game.

    That same level of freedom was also in GW2, after the Opening Story, you were free to do whatever you wanted at that point. Want to just explore, craft, follow the story, run dungeons, fram gear, or any of the many various things in the game, and it was there for you.. play how you like.

    I loved games like Trove and DDO for the same reasons. No one told me that I HAD to do specific things. or that I had to do any or all quests, I was free to do what I wanted to do, and not do what I didn't want to do.

    Personally, I think when WoW became just a juggernaut, that was when people who only knew how to design Single Player games thought they could make an MMO, and that is why so many MMO's feel like a single player game and players get bored and burned out fast.

    Where GW2, allowed a player to solo and play their own pace, the game itself, never felt like a single player game, other players being there around you, able to help you, and players could work together organically, really made it feel like a world.

    Such a good game, too bad they buckled to the WoW trolls and pissed all over their own flagship till it stunk.
    SovrathAmathexpsyncAlBQuirky
    Egotism is the anesthetic that dullens the pain of stupidity, this is why when I try to beat my head against the stupidity of other people, I only hurt myself.
  • WizardryWizardry Member LegendaryPosts: 18,805
    "Boring" is a good term to use,better than the typically FUN word.

    Boring means the game has to offer ideas that cover many topics like interesting,challenging,problem solving,tactics,collecting,scary,risky the list can go on and on.

    So if a game offers lots of ideas that keep the player's satisfied then i guess it is not boring.IMO there is however a line to be crossed,if you are going to call your game a MMO and a RPG it had better stick to those two ideas and NOT cross the line into something else that is silly and NOT supporting the mmorpg theme.

    Example ? and ! over npc heads is absolutely a dumbass idea.A Super Mario map is a dumb idea,jump puzzle maps do NOT fit either a MMO or RPG.Giving experience to your character because they went from point A to point B is again such a dumb idea i want to eliminate that developer from ever making games again.

    I have yet in all these years seen one mmorpg that constantly makes sense,usually just random off topic ideas and always to attain two things,levels and loot.So then the argument begins,to some those dumb ideas might not be boring but to others the idea of ruining a mmorpg ,turning it into something else makes it boring.

    I feel 95+% of mmorpg gamer's don't CARE,they are playing a mmorpg or if the game revolves around being an MMO or a RPG,all they care about is having something to do,some goals.
    xpsyncAlBQuirky

    Never forget 3 mile Island and never trust a government official or company spokesman.

  • xpsyncxpsync Member EpicPosts: 1,715
    edited August 2020
    I'm as hooked on mmorpg's again as i was back in early 2k era.

    Reflecting back i remember three very memorable times, and several other ones ofc.

    The very memorable ones were when i met the right peeps, loved the game, and in the moment didn't realize how memorable it was until it became a memory.

    EQ2 - 4 years, took that game to the limit with a guild from EQ. SWL - took that game to the extreme with a guild from TSW, and again with classic - with a guild from private servers.

    Many as exciting times but didn't fall in with peeps that way, sure joined guilds made friends but never rocked them as hard as those three, SWG was just mind = blown pretty much was a hermit moisture farmed out in the middle of nowhere on tat, Rift riding that wave of new players to the game, the shire omfg right, tabula rasa the list goes on.

    EQ2 and SWG was all i wanted to play back then until wow appeared and all anyone saw in the genre was $ signs.

    Sure a new mmorpg every other week was somewhat exciting but kinda just always missed dedicated to two worlds, they are my homes, ebb and flow comes with that too.

    My new homes are SWG:L and wow c/r i mean i'm looking at years and years of stuff to do, and i already know i'm not that interested anymore in playing anything else, you gotta know when you're there, and what to make of it.

    Sure there are less than exciting times to playing this way as well, but every single thing i do is always under the same umbrella. Take retail i started fresh on an RP server and remember when i had one warlock i played the chit out of, then classic hit played that very hard for many  months.

    Now mixing but mainly retail atm and now i have basically 10 120's and i love looking at that list and i select each character and omg i didn't realize but each character i have very different yet very fond experience memories i seriously didn't expect to have. Warlock was when i came back after a 10 year hiatus, and yeah omg i was green af, man the stuff i just didn't know lol, and then this toon omg remember just ripping through dungeons with the guild on that one, oh hell yeah this one and raiding, and f yes mythic + crazy on this one, solo questing on this guy.

    It's nice to know you will have fond memories under one umbrella, and know many more are still to come.
    Amatheblueturtle13UngoodKyleranAlBQuirky
    Your legend ends here and now! - (Battles Won Long Ago)

    Remember your ABC's, Always Be Casting! - Preheat 2021

    Currently Playing; WOW, SWG:L

  • KnightFalzKnightFalz Member EpicPosts: 1,677
    MMORPGs are boring if you play them in a way that bores you.

    Don't do that and you should be fine.

    For example, doing tedious things now in the hope of fun then sounds pretty boring to me, especially if then is going to be a long time from now.  So, I don't do that.

    That does come with the cost that I'll likely never experience the cutting edge of any game's content, but I'm not convinced that wouldn't be more like work than fun anyway.
    xpsyncJean-Luc_PicardAlBQuirky
  • worldsbestdadworldsbestdad Member UncommonPosts: 69
    MMORPGs are a sacred genre that should be passed on for generations to come.
    Any game came be boring if you go into it with the mindset that it's boring or it's going to be; just like with anything you do in life. 
    xpsyncAlBQuirky
  • TheocritusTheocritus Member EpicPosts: 8,202
    They are boring solo...if you have friends to play with they can be quite fun. The community makes the game I found. That's why I never thought any of the MMOs in the last 16 years have been worth a darn.
    AmarantharxpsyncAlBQuirky
  • AmarantharAmaranthar Member EpicPosts: 4,387
    edited August 2020
    They are boring solo...if you have friends to play with they can be quite fun. The community makes the game I found. That's why I never thought any of the MMOs in the last 16 years have been worth a darn.
    Thinking back, for me it's not just how "community" affects me, but also watching others do their thing. 
    There are numerous things to do in (some) games that I don't have a whole lot of interest in doing myself. But other players do. And it's just kind of cool to see them getting industrious about their chosen thing to do, as a group. 

    That's part of "Worldly." 
    It's bound to make a game more successful, which is a plus for all it's players who want their game to continue with revenues for maintaining it properly. 

    It also makes a game more interesting. I don't want a game with a bunch of look-alikes to me....talk about boredom! I can see that any time, and it's old hat by now.  :p
    xpsyncAlBQuirkytzervo

    Once upon a time....

  • xpsyncxpsync Member EpicPosts: 1,715
    They are boring solo...if you have friends to play with they can be quite fun. The community makes the game I found. That's why I never thought any of the MMOs in the last 16 years have been worth a darn.

    I personally don't find them boring solo when i have goals, i still guild chat just playing on my own for a bit got lots of things to do. There is a wildly large difference between the two though, and that's part of the beauty, so much variety within one game.
    AlBQuirky
    Your legend ends here and now! - (Battles Won Long Ago)

    Remember your ABC's, Always Be Casting! - Preheat 2021

    Currently Playing; WOW, SWG:L

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