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Intel's 7nm is delayed until 2022, 2023

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  • Asm0deusAsm0deus Member EpicPosts: 3,227
    Certainly an interesting development!

    Brenics ~ Just to point out I do believe Chris Roberts is going down as the man who cheated backers and took down crowdfunding for gaming.





  • CleffyCleffy Member RarePosts: 6,250
    edited July 24
    At that time, AMD will be plopping 32 cores on a single consumer CPU.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,098
    The big question for Intel was whether their troubled 10 nm process node was a one-off problem that they'd move past or if it was going to be standard going forward.  This certainly points toward the latter.

    That said, we don't yet know just how soon TSMC and Samsung will have a good 5 nm process available that actually works.  Process node nomenclature is dubious enough that Intel's 7 nm might well be closer to TSMC's or Samsung's 5 nm than to their 7 nm.  For now, TSMC and Samsung are claiming that everything is good.  But everything is always fine until it isn't.  Eventually, we're going to reach a wall where no one's die shrinks work as well as they had hoped.
  • remsleepremsleep Member RarePosts: 818
    Cleffy said:
    At that time, AMD will be plopping 32 cores on a single consumer CPU.

    in the consumer CPU space AMD has been a no-brainer choice for a while, Intel's continued seemingly self-inflicted problems certainly aren't helping
    Gdemami
  • CleffyCleffy Member RarePosts: 6,250
    It will all be worth it when Intel lunches their X9590 with 8 cores and a 250w tdp. 
    bigmilk
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,098
    Cleffy said:
    It will all be worth it when Intel lunches their X9590 with 8 cores and a 250w tdp. 
    In Intel's nomenclature, it's called a Core i9-10900K.  And it does have a 250 W PL2, which means about what TDP used to mean.  But it manages to fit ten cores into that, not just eight.
    RidelynnOzmodan
  • OzmodanOzmodan Member EpicPosts: 9,726
    Well I just built a couple I9-10900K systems for someone.  Paired with an Nvidia 2080ti they make an amazing game machine although these systems I built won't be used for that function for the most part.  

    My concern was the heat these systems put out, you will want an air-conditioned room to run them in.  I used Corsairs water coolers so the CPUs are reasonably cooled, but I did not overclock them, that is up to the user.  I am not sure running these at 5+GHZ is a good idea.
  • Sal1Sal1 Member UncommonPosts: 379
    Cleffy said:
    At that time, AMD will be plopping 32 cores on a single consumer CPU.
    What nano-meter is AMD at at this point in time?
  • remsleepremsleep Member RarePosts: 818
    edited July 28
    Sal1 said:
    Cleffy said:
    At that time, AMD will be plopping 32 cores on a single consumer CPU.
    What nano-meter is AMD at at this point in time?

    7nm since Zen2

    5nm slated for Zen4



    below 5nm - it's tricky about how it's defined 

    so 4nm and 3nm is all about vertical/stacked finFETs

    below 2nm you have to get very creative :)
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,098
    Sal1 said:
    Cleffy said:
    At that time, AMD will be plopping 32 cores on a single consumer CPU.
    What nano-meter is AMD at at this point in time?
    Right now, AMD's latest CPUs are built on TSMC's 7 nm process node.  AMD has a new generation coming later this year that will also be on some 7 nm process node, possibly the same as the previous, or possibly TSMC's 7 nm EUV node.

    It's also important to understand that process node nomenclature has become rather dubious.  TSMC's 7 nm process node might not actually be any better than Intel's 10 nm node.  And TSMC's 5 nm node might not be any better than Intel's 7 nm node.  That doesn't mean that TSMC is bad at building process nodes.  It means that they're more aggressive in naming them than Intel is.

    Even so, AMD has produced a large volume of parts on 7 nm well before Intel did on 10 nm.  AMD's Zen 2 CPUs have been around for about a year, while Intel still has little available on 10 nm.  And AMD will probably launch CPUs on TSMC's 5 nm node before Intel does on their own 7 nm node.  Intel's process node advantage that they held for decades is gone.
    Ozmodan
  • kitaradkitarad Member EpicPosts: 5,955
    The delay made Intel's stock drop like a stone.

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,098
    kitarad said:
    The delay made Intel's stock drop like a stone.
    Intel's stock shed about 1/6 of its value at the opening on Friday.  But it's still about 50% higher than it was three years ago before the process node problems were publicly known--even on 10 nm, let alone 7 nm.
  • CleffyCleffy Member RarePosts: 6,250
    Darn, they already reached that point. It's time they pull out the big guns and make a special prosumer platform that has 2 sockets.
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