Quantcast

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Zenith, Kickstarted Cyberpunk VR MMO, Shares Pre-Alpha Footage, Update on Alpha

2»

Comments

  • ultimateduckultimateduck Member RarePosts: 753
    jazz.be said:


    I played Alyx and before that probably I don't know, Elite? :D
    I have about 10-15 VR games in my library I'm not sure which one was the last I played.
    But in VR games look like you're playing in 480p on a normal screen so whatever detail the game pushes on your screen you won't be able to see everything cause of how close you are to the screen and how little pixels you have. So there's already that. To even come close to 1080p like quality we probably need 8k per eye or something, if not more. When was the last time you could see pixels on your monitor screen at normal distance?

    What VR HMD are you using?... and what computer are you using to power it?

    Depending on what I'm doing, I can see pixeling on my monitor. That's what anti aliasing is for. I suppose the difference with a flat screen is you are 2 feet away starting at an inanimate object (your screen). In VR, you are staring at a world with depth so pixeling isn't as noticeable unless you're trying to read fine print on something like a screen in Elite Dangerous.

    This was a bigger problem with the older HMDs like the CV1 Rift, HTC Vive and the newer but designed for standalone Quest. It's not a problem with the Rift S or Index (and maybe the HTC Vive Pro).

  • jazz.bejazz.be Member UncommonPosts: 915
    edited May 27
    jazz.be said:


    I played Alyx and before that probably I don't know, Elite? :D
    I have about 10-15 VR games in my library I'm not sure which one was the last I played.
    But in VR games look like you're playing in 480p on a normal screen so whatever detail the game pushes on your screen you won't be able to see everything cause of how close you are to the screen and how little pixels you have. So there's already that. To even come close to 1080p like quality we probably need 8k per eye or something, if not more. When was the last time you could see pixels on your monitor screen at normal distance?

    What VR HMD are you using?... and what computer are you using to power it?

    Depending on what I'm doing, I can see pixeling on my monitor. That's what anti aliasing is for. I suppose the difference with a flat screen is you are 2 feet away starting at an inanimate object (your screen). In VR, you are staring at a world with depth so pixeling isn't as noticeable unless you're trying to read fine print on something like a screen in Elite Dangerous.

    This was a bigger problem with the older HMDs like the CV1 Rift, HTC Vive and the newer but designed for standalone Quest. It's not a problem with the Rift S or Index (and maybe the HTC Vive Pro).

    Samsung Odyssey+. It's not as bad as several other headsets, the image looks soft. But that's just an illusion, they have used a softening technique that makes it harder to notice the pixels, but that doesn't make it magically give me more details.
    It suffers from the same fundamental problem all headsets have. A low amount of dpi for the distance between our eyes and the screen.
    Maybe if we have 16k per eye we would have a similar experience as 1080p on flat screens but imagine pushing out 16k x2 of details to the headset screens. By the time we can do that we would have reached something 8 times (or whatever) better on flat screens. That's why it will always lag behind on regular gaming until they find a way to let us experience the same high quality of details while not having to render everything all the time.
  • tzervotzervo Member RarePosts: 324
    edited May 27
    jazz.be said:

    By the time we can do that we would have reached something 8 times (or whatever) better on flat screens. That's why it will always lag behind on regular gaming until they find a way to let us experience the same high quality of details while not having to render everything all the time.
    High end flat screens have already reached and slightly surpassed the limit of detail an average eye can see. So unless they increase in size and/or drop in price (so you can buy bigger sizes) the perception will be that VR (and projectors, my personal favorite for gaming :P) are catching up.
  • jazz.bejazz.be Member UncommonPosts: 915
    tzervo said:
    jazz.be said:

    By the time we can do that we would have reached something 8 times (or whatever) better on flat screens. That's why it will always lag behind on regular gaming until they find a way to let us experience the same high quality of details while not having to render everything all the time.
    High end flat screens have already reached and slightly surpassed the limit of detail an average eye can see. So unless they increase in size and/or drop in price (so you can buy bigger sizes) the perception will be that VR (and projectors, my personal favorite for gaming :P) are catching up.
    Sure in terms of resolution maybe. But resolution is not the only factor that gives quality to a game. A last gen 1080p game looks different from a 1080p game from 5 or 10 years ago. It requires more computing power to achieve that. So we're always limited by the computing power and VR will always require more just to achieve its acceptable resolution alone (which is far higher than regular flat screen gaming), which then can only provide less details and quality to compensate. Basically you can play at 4k in low/medium settings or you can play at 1080p at high settings. I'm not working in the field but this makes sense to me and that's why I think we don't see these huge quality games like we get in regular flat screen gaming. Even if they would give us 16k per eye it would still look lower quality compared to regular gaming because in regular gaming you'll always more power available to give crazy shiny details.

    Not so sure if that makes such a difference for projectors? It's in principle the same as just regular flat screen gaming.
    tzervo
  • tzervotzervo Member RarePosts: 324
    jazz.be said:

    Not so sure if that makes such a difference for projectors? It's in principle the same as just regular flat screen gaming.
    Correct.
  • ultimateduckultimateduck Member RarePosts: 753
    I haven't heard good things about the Odyssey HMDs but I'd be lying if I said I have tried one. The way you make it sound, you also have bad things to say about them.

    I can tell you that in my CV1 Rift I could not read the small text on my ship in ED but my Rift S can. The way the Rift S LED is set up allows for a pretty crisp image. Here is an example blown up so you can see the pixels and how they are laid out for a more crisp image.



Sign In or Register to comment.