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Solid State and M.2's

xD_GamingxD_Gaming Member EpicPosts: 2,685
My biggest concern on switching over completely is how trustworthy are these drives ? Do they hold up as long as HDD's ? I will be doing more research and thinking of maybe going with 1 3tb hdd then the rest in solid state drives. 

Right now I have 5 terabytes of space with standard drives with 1 solid state drive. 
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Comments

  • VrikaVrika Member EpicPosts: 6,436
    edited March 31
    For normal use they're all about equally reliable. If you want to keep your data protected use a backup. The difference between technologies is so small that you can't keep your data better protected by choosing one tech over another.



    If your computer gets shaken a lot during use (some uses for laptops), then SSD tech is more resistant to shaking. On the other hand HDDs are better for some backup solutions where the disk gets constantly written on but almost never read, or if you want to store data on external disk once and then keep it disconnected for years.
    xD_GamingRidelynn
     
  • CleffyCleffy Member RarePosts: 6,253
    Hdd is going to be a safer way to store your data. But you then have read speeds 1/40th of what you will get with nVME. The only HDDs that have failed on me were over 10 years old and not connected to a pc for a couple years. Even then I think I could still recover the data.
    I don't think I would trust an nVME drive to last longer than 5 years. Personally, I use an nVME and have an online backup. 
    xD_Gaming
  • xD_GamingxD_Gaming Member EpicPosts: 2,685
    edited April 3
    That's what I'm wondering. I've had my ssd for a while and feel it is pretty trustworthy, but something like a nVME , seems sketchy lol. 
    There is a multiverse inside our minds which millions live.
    Twitter : @xD_Gaming_Merch
    xD Merch : https://bit.ly/2v13MT8
    "Dragons are tilly folly !"
  • CleffyCleffy Member RarePosts: 6,253
    Solid state drives are much more stable today than 5 years ago. I would say an nVME is going to be more stable than an SSD from 5 years ago. However there is only so many times you can write something to the drive and you will get there much quicker at whatever ridiculous speed you can achieve with nVME.
    The nVME drive is definitely an upgrade. There are  2 types that typically get built. There is the slower ones that are more stable and the faster ones that are less stable. I would pick one in your price range and thermal envelope, then backup your data in a secure method. That way if your drive goes kaput it's not really a big deal.
    xD_Gaming
  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,061
    The biggest difference between an NVMe and SATA SSD is that a sata will often have a 2.5” shell around it. It’s often the exact same NAND, just a different controller chip and plug on the back.
    xD_GamingOzmodan
  • VrikaVrika Member EpicPosts: 6,436
    edited April 3
    xD_Gaming said:
    That's what I'm wondering. I've had my ssd for a while and feel it is pretty trustworthy, but something like a nVME , seems sketchy lol. 
    NVMe is an interface for transferring data between device and rest of the computer. NVMe drives and SSDs are both same technology, and sometimes even identical devices inside. With SSD that device is just packaged into a form and interface that's compatible with what all computers had before SSDs became common, whereas M.2 and NVMe are new form factor and interface designed for SSD tech now that SSDs are common.
    xD_Gaming
     
  • Asm0deusAsm0deus Member EpicPosts: 3,240
    edited April 6
    Depends on use I guess but for use in a PC for general back ups or storing of , games, videos, music, pictures etc that will  be juggled (ssd←→PC HDD→ NAS) around fairly often HDD's may not be that great depending on what you get.  

    Many low volume, like 6-8 tb or less, hdd now use smr tech which frankly is kind of shitty and seagate and WD try and hide this info and make it tough to find out if they are smr or pmr etc etc.

    The smr drive are like shingled roofs so if you rewrite something it needs to read/rewrite all the shingles around w/e is being rewritten since the block overlap each other.

    The theory is that this is fine if these are being used for back up and the like but they don't work all that great I find and are less reliable in a game PC as a general use HDD.  I have also read lots of peeps that run bigger NAS try to avoid them as backing up something that would normally take 1 day with PMR takes like 1 week with SMR, might be a slight exaggeration but you get the point.

    Also forget smr if you are using for your torrent downloads, will be quite slow and not last long, I have had two hdd fail in the last 5 years and they happened to be my newer HDD that were smr, anecdotal I know but that's how I found out about SMR.

    SMR is a cheap way to boost capacity for an equal cost but I do believe it means lower performance and durability of the HDD in many use cases, unless you write on it once and use em for cold storage then it may be a decent option but frankly I myself will be avoiding any HDD I find out are SMR drive in the future for my particular use as hdd general use back up in my PC rig.

    I think lots of peeps don't know about SMR tech and it feels likes the industries dirty little secret to me.

    I think you will find you will have much less issues if using a PMR HDD.

    Post edited by Asm0deus on

    Brenics ~ Just to point out I do believe Chris Roberts is going down as the man who cheated backers and took down crowdfunding for gaming.





  • OzmodanOzmodan Member EpicPosts: 9,726
    What I have done is put my steam account on a large HDD and then I move games that I play often to my SSD.  Works rather well and I am not tying up the SSD with a lot of storage that I really don't use much.
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