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How does Coronavirus Ever End?

AmatheAmathe Member LegendaryPosts: 6,678
After seeing the E3 closure, I got to thinking. Does coronavirus:

A.  Just keep spreading like wildfire, so long as there is combustible material (i.e., vulnerable people);
B.  Keeps going until some force of nature, like temperature, stops it;
C.  Keeps going until time stops it; and/or
D.  Keeps going until someone finds a cure or a vaccine.

I am asking only about the science of this disease, not anyone's politics or blame, please.

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Comments

  • NarugNarug Member UncommonPosts: 736
    That's the question huh?

    Does it mutate?

    Does it keep getting weaker when replicated enough?

    Does warmer weather help?

    Any higher scientifically enclined folks/doctors/virologists on here to theorize/know?

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  • AmatheAmathe Member LegendaryPosts: 6,678
    Narug said:
    That's the question huh?

    Does it mutate?

    Does it keep getting weaker when replicated enough?

    Does warmer weather help?

    Any higher scientifically enclined folks/doctors/virologists on here to theorize/know?
    And just to clarify I am not a scientist or a medical doctor or anything of the sort.  Just a guy with curiosity as to what is happening.

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  • NarugNarug Member UncommonPosts: 736
    Nope don't mean to imply that Amathe

    I wonder if the fear will outweigh the disease.
    Amathe

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  • AmatheAmathe Member LegendaryPosts: 6,678
    edited March 11
    I spoke to someone who said it is basically a race to see which happens first - we (humans) develop immunity naturally over time, or we find a cure/vaccine. 

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  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,632
    What makes the new coronavirus nasty right now is that it's new so basically no one has any immunity to it.  A disease that you have no immunity to at all can be much worse than one that you're already immune to, or even just partially immune on the basis of being immune to something very similar.

    That can lead to spikes where a huge number of people get the disease all at once.  If half of society were to get the new coronavirus, but it was spread out evenly over the course of a decade, that wouldn't be that big of a deal.  If half of society gets the new coronavirus all in the same week, that will overwhelm the medical system and a lot of people will die who would have been fine if the resources to get proper treatment were available.

    I don't see it being quickly wiped out the way that SARS or MERS were.  It's spreading too far, too fast, and isn't practical to contain at this point.

    It could end up being kind of like chicken pox.  That used to be a childhood disease that most people would get as a kid, and it wasn't that big of a deal, provided that you got it while young.  Once you had it once, you were mostly immune to it for the rest of your life.  Then eventually they figured out how to make a vaccine for it.

    It could also end up being kind of like the flu, which mutates enough that having had the flu before gives you some partial immunity against other flu viruses, but not necessarily enough to prevent you from getting the flu again.  That will likely get less bad as people build up some degree of immunity from a combination of having had it before and whatever they can do for immunizations.

    Of course "kind of like the flu" doesn't mean "exactly as bad as the flu".  It could end up being much worse than the flu, or much milder.  Remember that the flu is as bad as it is today after decades of work in trying to figure out how to combat it.  We don't have decades of experience with COVID-19 yet.

    But ultimately, the answer is that we really don't know.  We don't know if warming temperatures will help to contain the virus as it does with the flu.  Thus far, only about 0.1% of the known deaths have been in the southern hemisphere (where it is now summer), which is a good sign, but also explainable by the virus just not spreading there early.

    We also don't know if catching it once means you're immune for life, or if it will evolve enough that you could catch it again every year.  We don't know how practical it is to vaccinate against it.  We know that it hits older people much, much harder than young people, but we don't know why.
    AmatheMendel
  • NarugNarug Member UncommonPosts: 736
    "Jeremy Rossman, Honorary Senior Lecturer in Virology and President of Research-Aid Networks, University of Kent"

    "Returning to the comparison with the flu, the 2009-2010 influenza virus pandemic began in the spring, increased in strength over the spring and summer and peaked the following winter. 

    This suggests that in a pandemic, the high number of cases in many countries around the world could enable continued transmission of the virus throughout the summer, overcoming any seasonal variability that would be seen in smaller epidemics."

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  • NarugNarug Member UncommonPosts: 736
    Yet another casualty.

    If anybody else lives near the region the Houston Livestock Fair & Rodeo was cancelled.

    Bye Bye NBA season.

    Is this the real endgame?  Is the endgame within?

    Do we lose our heart & soul but outlive the disease?

    AC2 Player RIP Final Death Jan 31st 2017

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  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,632
    Narug said:
    Yet another casualty.

    If anybody else lives near the region the Houston Livestock Fair & Rodeo was cancelled.

    Bye Bye NBA season.

    Is this the real endgame?  Is the endgame within?

    Do we lose our heart & soul but outlive the disease?
    The new virus won't cancel everything forever.  For now, the goal is to slow it down.  If you can spread the initial rush of cases over three times as long of a period of time, so that only 1/3 as many people have it at a time, then you can treat three times as many of the people who catch it in the initial rush.  That could save hundreds of thousands of lives.

    Eventually, humanity will adapt.  Even in the quite bad (and rather unlikely) case where high volumes of people catch the new virus forever without its dangerousness dropping as people gain immunity, we'll eventually build more hospitals and have more doctors specialize in dealing with it.
  • NarugNarug Member UncommonPosts: 736
    The infection rate was nearly 4 times higher on the ship than the most at-risk areas in mainland China.
     
    Healthline: Why can quarantines, such as the one on the cruise ship in Japan, backfire? Why can they up the risk of transmission?

    Dr. Anne Rimoin: Quarantines are designed to prevent disease transmission by restricting the movements of individuals who have been, or might have been, exposed to a contagious pathogen until they’re out of the window of developing disease.
     
    It’s difficult to properly execute any quarantine, and the realities of a cruise ship, where space is limited and people are existing together in such close quarters, is an ideal situation for spread of disease.
     
    A mass quarantine can put people at greater risk of infection if you can’t identify and isolate those who are ill from those who are well. 

    What’s your take on travel bans to/from high-risk areas — do they actually work?

    Travel bans are complicated and often counterproductive.

    It’s possible that a travel ban from the most high-risk areas might slow spread of disease at the very beginning of an outbreak, but as many health experts have noted, with a disease like COVID-19, travel bans aren’t particularly effective. In this case, the genie is already out of the bottle.
     
    It has been established that COVID-19 can present with mild or no symptoms at all. As a result, it can spread before someone knows that they are ill.

    Millions of people have been traveling internationally without symptoms or mild disease for weeks before the epidemic was recognized. There are cases all over the world at this point.

    YET

    What’s the most effective way to limit the spread, or is it a combination of different measures?

    Limiting the spread of SARS-CoV-2 will be based on a combination of measures.

    For the individual, everyday good hygiene practices are the key to limiting the spread of COVID-19. Wash your hands, don’t touch your face, regularly disinfect your cellphone and common surfaces (countertops, remote controls, refrigerator handles), avoid people who are sick if possible.

    Be sure to get your flu shot and do your best to stay healthy. Avoiding hospitals and medical facilities unless absolutely necessary is a good idea to reduce exposure to COVID-19 and other pathogens like influenza.

    Also being a good public health citizen by staying home when you’re sick — or doing your best to avoid contact with others — will help limit spread of the disease.

    Community measures to limit spread may include cancelling events or meetings where large numbers of people will gather.

    https://www.mic.com/p/what-is-social-distancing-can-it-help-stop-the-spread-of-infectious-disease-21770552

    Taking larger-scale social distancing measures here in the US probably won’t be necessary, unless infections surface so fast that a municipality or hospital can’t keep up, a situation known as sustained community transmission, Ashish Jha, a public health researcher at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, told STAT. The emergence of the virus in schools and daycare, where many viruses are routinely spread, could also signal a need for greater social distancing.

    Social distancing may seem like a surefire way to prevent disease spread, but it can come at a steep cost. Not only isn’t there strong data supporting its effectiveness, Jha noted, but large-scale quarantining would disrupt travel, trade, and other functions crucial to a globalized society, making it hugely expensive.

    http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.556.2672&rep=rep1&type=pdf

    BIOSECURITY AND BIOTERRORISM: BIODEFENSE STRATEGY, PRACTICE, AND SCIENCE Volume 4, Number 4, 2006 © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

    Disease Mitigation Measures in the Control of Pandemic Influenza

    THOMAS V. INGLESBY, JENNIFER B. NUZZO, TARA O’TOOLE, and D. A. HENDERSON

    School Closures
     
    In previous influenza epidemics, the impact of school closings on illness rates has been mixed.2 A study from Israel reported a decrease in respiratory infections after a 2-week teacher strike, but the decrease was only evident for a single day.51 On the other hand, when schools closed for a winter holiday during the 1918 pandemic in Chicago, “more influenza cases developed among pupils . . . than when schools were in session.”2,52

    Maintaining Personal Distance

    It has been recommended that individuals maintain a distance of 3 feet or more during a pandemic so as to diminish the number of contacts with people who may be infected.10,54 The efficacy of this measure is unknown. It is typically assumed that transmission of droplet-spread diseases, such as influenza, is limited to “close contacts”—that is, being within 3–6 feet of an infected person.4 Keeping a space of 3 feet between individuals might be possible in some work environments, but it is difficult to imagine how bus, rail, or air travelers could stay 3 feet apart from each other throughout an epidemic. And such a recommendation would greatly complicate normal daily tasks like grocery shopping, banking, and the like.

    https://www.pnas.org/content/104/18/7588.full

    During the 1918 influenza pandemic, the U.S., unlike Europe, put considerable effort into public health interventions.

    The model reproduced the observed epidemic patterns well. In line with theoretical arguments, we found the time-limited interventions used reduced total mortality only moderately (perhaps 10–30%), and that the impact was often very limited because of interventions being introduced too late and lifted too early. San Francisco, St. Louis, Milwaukee, and Kansas City had the most effective interventions, reducing transmission rates by up to 30–50%

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  • MendelMendel Member EpicPosts: 3,664
    I don't know about all this social distancing stuff that's being pushed on the public, but it's pretty easy to see a period of very peculiar porn on the horizon.  :*

    ----------
    Really, the World Health Organization Situation Report - 52 (dated 12 March 2020) only claims 125,048 confirmed cases in the world, with 4,613 confirmed deaths.  That's a bit low of a death rate, especially given the worldwide reaction.  It may be that this "pandemic" is being blown out of proportion by news people.

    Precautions, yes.  Panic, no thanks.



    Logic, my dear, merely enables one to be wrong with great authority.

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,632
    If 1% of the people who get the new coronavirus die of it, and a million people eventually get it, then sure, that's not a catastrophe.  That's a lot fewer deaths than the flu in a given year.  But if everyone just ignores it and doesn't do anything to counter it, and then a billion people end up getting it, that's the worst pandemic in decades.

    Furthermore, if the eventual number of people infected stops at a million, that won't overwhelm health care systems, with the exception of a handful of local problems.  If a billion people eventually are infected, including 100 million simultaneously, then it won't be possible to properly treat more than a tiny fraction of them during the big spike.  Even if it would have been a 1% death rate with good treatment, if that turns into a 5% death rate when completely untreated, we could be looking at a pandemic that kills more people in a short amount of time than any other in human history.

    The big thing is, when someone gets infected, how many others does he infect?  If an average patient infects 0.5 other people before recovering (or dying), then half of the people who will ever have it already do, and it's not going to be that bad.  If an average patient infects 2 other people, then it's going to keep growing exponentially for quite a while and we could ultimately see most of the people alive get infected.

    The optimal precautions are whatever the minimal efforts are required to get that average transmission rate significantly below 1.  If you can do that with minimal measures that don't affect most of the population (as happened with SARS and MERS), then you shouldn't go beyond that.  That seems to have already failed, though.  If it takes quarantines and social distancing to make it happen, then it's worth it.

    People need to take the new virus seriously and take appropriate precautions.  Cooperate with whatever quarantines or gathering restrictions are imposed as best as you possibly can.  If half of the population cooperates with a quarantine and the other half doesn't, and the virus spreads exponentially among the half that doesn't, that's catastrophic.

    If handled appropriately, it probably won't be that bad, and the situation will be under control soon enough.  It's nothing to panic over.  But it does need to be taken seriously, because it's deadly serious.
  • AmatheAmathe Member LegendaryPosts: 6,678
    Be glad that ours is a pastime that can still be enjoyed alone, at home. At least until you get toted off to some facility and it all goes to hell.
    Narug

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  • NarugNarug Member UncommonPosts: 736
    edited March 14
    I admit coming to blow off steam from being fatigued about the situation.



    That's what fatigues me about all this.

    I guess I'm questioning the cost.

    Anyhoo, I guess when I run out of the 2 packs of TP I have it's time to go leaf shopping. ;)



    I may continue this later.
    Post edited by Narug on

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  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,632
    The virus shouldn't cause people to use toilet paper meaningfully faster than normal.  The problem is a bunch of idiots suddenly trying to get much larger than normal stockpiles all at once.  But the virus hasn't shut down production of toilet paper, so the stores will be restocked soon enough.

    What's needed here is some price gouging.  If stores temporarily triple the prices on things that are in high demand for no good reason, they can take a good bite out of the idiots who are buying way too much, and maybe dissuade some from doing so.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,632
    I actually met with a doctor today.  The people at the front desk were wearing face masks.  The doctor wasn't.  And the doctor had a mild cough.  His specialty is unrelated to infectious diseases, so he wouldn't see people who were suspected to have the new virus, anyway.

    When I asked about it, the doctor said that the masks that the people at the front desk were wearing were basically for show, as they wouldn't do any good.  To the extent that they had any effect, it would be to make things worse, as masks that make your face itch will lead to you touching your face far more.  And that's why he wasn't going to wear a mask.

    The doctor did, however, keep his distance from me.  I don't know if it was the recommended six feet, but it was somewhere around there.
  • AsheramAsheram Member EpicPosts: 3,999

    Published in 1981


    Published in 2008. She passed away in 2013



  • AsheramAsheram Member EpicPosts: 3,999
    Narug said:
    I admit coming to blow off steam from being fatigued about the situation.



    That's what fatigues me about all this.

    I guess I'm questioning the cost.

    Anyhoo, I guess when I run out of the 2 packs of TP I have it's time to go leaf shopping. ;)



    I may continue this later.

    Narug
  • CaffynatedCaffynated Member RarePosts: 649
    There's no way to know how bad it's going to be.

    In Korea they began isolation early and largely stopped the spread. Infection rates were low and hospitals were able to handle the load of ICU cases to limit the death toll. They're not out of the woods yet, but the trend is positive. 

    In the US... yeah, we're basically doing nothing. Early attempts to close the border were stymied because "muh racism", there's been pushback to social isolation suggestions with idiots still traveling around like there's not a global pandemic, stockpiling of medical supplies by morons has lead to shortages for healthcare professionals who need them, and our partisan political system can't get out of its own way as our moron leaders care more about winning points than solving problems. You would think an outbreak at AIPAC where all of our politicians gather to pander to their biggest fundraisers would have scared them into being reasonable, but we're not that lucky and they're not that smart. 
  • NarugNarug Member UncommonPosts: 736
    The Psychology

    https://www.newsadvance.com/news/trending/there-s-plenty-of-toilet-paper-in-the-us-so/article_6e0a1213-7380-5094-bcf4-66d8b673a972.html

    100 rolls a year

    The average person in the U.S. uses about 100 rolls of toilet paper each year. If most of it came from China, this could be a huge problem because supply chains from that country have been severely disrupted as a result of COVID-19.

    The U.S., however, imports very little toilet paper – less than 10% in 2017. And most of that comes from Canada and Mexico.

    The U.S. has been mass producing toilet paper since the late 1800s. And while other industries like shoe manufacturing have fled the country, toilet paper manufacturing has not. Today there are almost 150 U.S. companies making this product.

    Why people hoard

    So then why would people hoard a product that is abundant?

    Australia has also suffered from panic buying of toilet paper despite plentiful domestic supply. A risk expert in the country explained it this way: “Stocking up on toilet paper is … a relatively cheap action, and people like to think that they are ‘doing something’ when they feel at risk.

    This is an example of “zero risk bias,” in which people prefer to try to eliminate one type of possibly superficial risk entirely rather than do something that would reduce their total risk by a greater amount.

    Hoarding also makes people feel secure. This is especially relevant when the world is faced with a novel disease over which all of us have little or no control. However, we can control things like having enough toilet paper in case we are quarantined.

    It’s also possible we are biologically programmed to hoard. Birds, squirrels and other animals tend to hoard stuff.

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/09/health/toilet-paper-shortages-novel-coronavirus-trnd/index.html


    That explains things as well.

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  • NarugNarug Member UncommonPosts: 736
    The Supply Chain or Retail End Discussion

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/grocers-fail-to-keep-up-with-demand-as-coronavirus-pandemic-spreads/ar-BB11bBJs?ocid=msedgntp

    U.S. retailers have experience preparing for surges in demand ahead of natural disasters such as hurricanes and blizzards. This pandemic is unique because it created a similar emergency across the entire country with no clear end, said industry executives including John Ross, CEO of IGA Inc., an association of about 600 U.S. independent grocers.


    “The difference here is scaling up contingency plans for a national emergency,” he said.


    Warehouse workers and drivers are starting to feel the strain. Steven Spinner, chief executive of distributor United Natural Foods Inc., said during an earnings call this week that it has been challenging to meet the rise in demand over the past two weeks. Distributors and retailers are “spending 28 hours a day” to keep the stocks full, he said.


    The manufacturers of toilet paper and other items flying off store shelves say they are ramping up production to meet higher demand for their household essentials and long-lasting foods.


    John Church, chief supply chain officer at General Mills Inc., said his team is making last-minute changes to where it sends inventory to meet demand. “We have plants running at near capacity,” he said.


    Conagra Brands Inc. is devoting more of its factory lines to top-selling items. Campbell Soup Co. Chief Executive Mark Clouse said the company is lining up multiple suppliers for important ingredients, in case factories around the world close.


    Michael Kirban, CEO of Vita Coco, said he is ramping up production of his coconut water in Brazil to meet high demand in the U.S. He said weekly sales have spiked 200% at Walmart.com and 60% at Amazon.com.


    "No one can prepare for that. Not even Amazon,” Mr. Kirban said.

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  • NarugNarug Member UncommonPosts: 736
    Asheram said:

    You know me & a co-worker were jesting about that today  ;)

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  • NarugNarug Member UncommonPosts: 736
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/worst-case-estimates-for-us-coronavirus-deaths/ar-BB118txk?ocid=spartanntp

    The four scenarios have different parameters, which is why the projections range so widely. They variously assume that each person with the coronavirus would infect either two or three people; that the hospitalization rate would be either 3 percent or 12; and that either 1 percent or a quarter of a percent of people experiencing symptoms would die. Those assumptions are based on what is known so far about how the virus has behaved in other contexts, including in China.

    YET

    Dr. James Lawler, an infectious diseases specialist and public health expert at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.


    Dr. Lawler’s calculations suggested 480,000 deaths, which he said was conservative. By contrast, about 20,000 to 50,000 people have died from flu-related illnesses this season, according to the C.D.C. Unlike with seasonal influenza, the entire population is thought to be susceptible to the new coronavirus.


    Dr Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases


    He said a single targeted step — a school closing, or a limit on mass gatherings — cannot stop an outbreak on its own. But as with Swiss cheese, layering them together can be effective.

    This conclusion is backed up by history.

    The most lethal pandemic to hit the United States was the 1918 Spanish flu, which was responsible for about 675,000 American deaths, according to estimates cited by the C.D.C.

    The Institute for Disease Modeling calculated that the new coronavirus is roughly equally transmissible as the 1918 flu, and just slightly less clinically severe, and it is higher in both transmissibility and severity compared with all other flu viruses in the past century.

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  • NarugNarug Member UncommonPosts: 736
    Controversy?

    Someone says in the comments in this article that there are 2 strains?

    https://currently.att.yahoo.com/att/coronavirus-infectious-diseases-professor-grahame-medley-185144010.html

    Coronavirus: The simple advice for dealing with COVID-19 from an infectious diseases professor

    But Professor Medley said the way to combat the virus was through “herd immunity” - meaning humans become immune to virus through infection.

    "This virus is going to be with us for a long time, we're going to have an epidemic and then it will become endemic and join in with all the other coronaviruses that we all have all the time, but don't notice,” he continued.

    "We're going to have to generate what we call herd immunity. So that's a situation where the majority of the population are immune to the infection.

    "And the only way of developing that in the absence of a vaccine is for the majority of the population to become infected.

    "Ideally, if I could, what I would like to do is to put all the all the more vulnerable people into the north of Scotland and keep them there, everybody else into Kent and have a nice, big epidemic in Kent, so that everyone becomes immune, and then we can put people back together again.

    "But we can't do that. So what we're going to have to try and do ideally is some kind of manage this acquisition of herd immunity and minimise the exposure of people who are vulnerable."

    https://currently.att.yahoo.com/news/marty-makary-on-coronavirus-in-the-us-183558545.html

    'Don't believe the numbers you see': Johns Hopkins professor says up to 500,000 Americans have coronavirus

    “Don’t believe the numbers when you see, even on our Johns Hopkins website, that 1,600 Americans have the virus,” he said. “No, that means 1,600 got the test, tested positive. There are probably 25 to 50 people who have the virus for every one person who is confirmed.” 

    He added: “I think we have between 50,000 and half a million cases right now walking around in the United States.”

    Part of the reason the number of cases might be higher without people realizing it is because of the shortage of coronavirus testing kits from the CDC. Between Jan. 18 and March 12, there were 13,624 tests for COVID-19 conducted in the U.S. Meanwhile, South Korea has conducted over 100,000 tests, and the U.K. has tested nearly 25,000 people.

    “Look, we’ve got to abandon this idea that this virus is contained,” Makary said. “It is at large, and assume it’s on every door handle and on every car door and with every handshake.”

    https://currently.att.yahoo.com/news/coronavirus-outbreak-likely-annual-virus-134456752.html

    Coronavirus outbreak 'likely to be an annual virus', says Government's chief scientific officer


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  • NarugNarug Member UncommonPosts: 736
    Sorry more jumping back to supply / retail

    https://currently.att.yahoo.com/news/really-toilet-paper-shortage-142257936.html

    Major retailers say toilet paper hasn’t been out of stock in stores for more than a day or two, or even a few hours. Manufacturers, paper industry executives say, are raising production to meet demand, but there is only so much capacity that they can or are willing to add.

    They want to satisfy panic buying without going overboard and creating a glut on the market when the surge subsides.

    Unlike some other products, toilet paper is not likely to be used more by Americans who are stricken with respiratory symptoms, even as the coronavirus spreads.

    “You are not using more of it. You are just filling up your closet with it,” said Jeff Anderson, president of Precision Paper Converters, a paper product manufacturer with 65 employees outside Green Bay, Wisconsin. “What happens in the summer when demand dries up and people have all this extra product in their homes?”

    Anderson’s business focuses on facial tissues, which are also in high demand, and he is paying employees overtime to work longer shifts. “We can’t make as much as they want right now,” he said.

    Perhaps more than in its recent past, the paper industry seems well positioned to meet the surging demand. After decades of declining sales, as newspapers and printed documents lost out in the digital age, many manufacturers converted to making tissue products, like toilet paper and wipes. That means there is more manufacturing capacity that can be brought online.

    But toilet paper is typically made to order. Because it takes up so much room, storing large quantities is not profitable, so the industry typically has only a few months of inventory on hand.

    “There is not some big underground warehouse like in ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark’ where there is all this toilet paper sitting around in case it is needed,” said Dan Clarahan, president of United Converting, which sells manufacturing equipment to tissue companies.

    Joe Raccuia, chief executive of Morcon Tissue, which makes toilet paper in plants across the United States, said his supplier in Mexico had warned him about delays.

    “It’s a matter of weeks, not months,” said Raccuia, who sells his toilet paper mostly to hotels and restaurants.

    It’s not just toilet paper that people are stockpiling, of course. Weeks ago, there were shortages of hand sanitizer. By Friday, the panic buying had extended to bottled water and thermometers.

    Popular thermometers, like those sold under the Vicks brand, were listed as out of stock on the websites of retailers like Target, Walmart, CVS, Walgreens and Staples.

    Even on Amazon, the options were grim. For example, a Vicks ComfortFlex thermometer that was listed for about $10 on Walmart’s website was being sold by two sellers on Amazon for at least $40 and could not be delivered for at least a week — a far cry from Amazon’s usual advantages on price and speed.

    Amazon did not respond to a request for comment Friday.

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