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What Blizzard should do

YashaXYashaX Member EpicPosts: 2,415
Blizzard is a big company, and its clear that many of its employees are angry and upset about the recent scandal. In my opinion, it is imperative that they listen to their employees, fans, and the overwhelming outcry in the gaming community and elsewhere by acting swiftly and decisively to put things straight.

At the moment Blizzard is just twiddling its thumbs and hoping this will all blow over; a terribly bad way to approach the issue in my view.

If you were in management's shoes how would you proceed from here? 


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Comments

  • elveoneelveone Member RarePosts: 268
    Nothing. Individuals within the company are free to hold any political view they want but a company should not have any political inclinations. Like it or not when a business partner asks a company to uphold their own terms and conditions or lose a significant portion of their revenue the said company should do that when doing otherwise could lead to financial turmoil for the company and layoffs for its employees.
    IselinUtinniNephethHatefullAlBQuirky
  • iixviiiixiixviiiix Member RarePosts: 2,015
    I think right now Blizzard is happy , they get attention in west and get supported from china . There are no bigger reward than this
    CryomatrixHariken
  • bcbullybcbully Member EpicPosts: 9,821
    Blizzard such ask China nicely to not censor US citizens on US soil...

    what a a crock of shit.
  • DibdabsDibdabs Member RarePosts: 2,852
    bcbully said:
    Blizzard such ask China nicely to not censor US citizens on US soil...

    what a a crock of shit.

    Didn't the guy use a Blizzard event as an unwitting tool of political communication?  I would think they would be pissed off, so it's their event, their money, their game and as such I don't think they did anything wrong.  He could have caused sanctions that could have cost Blizzard a MASSIVE amount of revenue.

    If the guy had made his protest AWAY from the venue I would agree he should be able to express his political views without any bother.
    elveoneHatefullAlBQuirkyphoenixfire2
  • HorusraHorusra Member EpicPosts: 4,144
    Blizzard will do nothing more like Apple and Disney are doing or risk being the NBA with companies in China pulling out of partnerships.  Welcome to global economies where politics do not matter over money.
    AlBQuirky
  • LawlmonsterLawlmonster Member UncommonPosts: 1,085
    edited October 10
    I think it's a bit hypocritical for a company that's prospered due to a democratic system to kowtow at the behest of Chinese censorship to protect their business interests. Ultimately, however, I'm glad they banned the player, and not because I think he should be punished for breaking any rules or using a platform that's been created for something in a way it wasn't meant to be utilized. I'm glad because banning him has, without a doubt, drawn an even greater attention to the contentious relationship between Hong Kong and China for people who might not otherwise know or give a damn.

    As to answer the thread, in the position they've put themselves, I think they might have to make a hard choice between an ethical dilemma and a capital dilemma. Which is more important to them? I wouldn't even pretend to say I could confidently make that judgement with the information I have as an outsider.
    YashaX

    "This is life! We suffer and slave and expire. That's it!" -Bernard Black (Dylan Moran)

  • AAAMEOWAAAMEOW Member RarePosts: 1,154
    If anyone are willing to sacrifice their own money to protest something, they are a better person than me.  I surely ain't.  So I don't blame Blizzard.
    elveoneboris20AlBQuirky
  • PhryPhry Member LegendaryPosts: 11,004
    It probably won't matter what Blizzard does at this point, after the official message that Blizzard released in China about this incident, they are pretty much screwed, now they get to face the consequences, there are not many things in this world that both the Democrat and the Republican parties are in agreement over, but Blizzard just became one of them. :/  
    elveoneYashaXbcbullyTyranusPrime
  • UtinniUtinni Member RarePosts: 1,231
    They'll just ride this out. Keyboard activists who haven't batted an eye over HK until now will forget in a week or two when they have something else to be pseudo-righteous about. Expecting them to fold on the majority of their customers because one guy decided to soapbox on their stream is insanity. 
    elveonembrodieWarEnsembleHatefullAlBQuirkyphoenixfire2
  • PhryPhry Member LegendaryPosts: 11,004
    Utinni said:
    They'll just ride this out. Keyboard activists who haven't batted an eye over HK until now will forget in a week or two when they have something else to be pseudo-righteous about. Expecting them to fold on the majority of their customers because one guy decided to soapbox on their stream is insanity. 
    I think its more a case of public awareness, if this hadn't raised public awareness about Hong Kong and China, then i seriously doubt the Politicians would have become involved, but because the subject matter is related to human rights, it becomes an emotive one, particularly as more news about what is happening in Hong Kong becomes mainstream, then there is the other far more important thing, do you think for one moment that Trump will not use this to his advantage in some way? the guy is a master of 4D chess, so i seriously doubt this is going to blow over any time soon, and it would not surprise me in the least if Blizzard is considered to be a 'sacrificial' piece in said 4D chess game. :/
  • UtinniUtinni Member RarePosts: 1,231
    Phry said:
    Utinni said:
    They'll just ride this out. Keyboard activists who haven't batted an eye over HK until now will forget in a week or two when they have something else to be pseudo-righteous about. Expecting them to fold on the majority of their customers because one guy decided to soapbox on their stream is insanity. 
    I think its more a case of public awareness, if this hadn't raised public awareness about Hong Kong and China, then i seriously doubt the Politicians would have become involved, but because the subject matter is related to human rights, it becomes an emotive one, particularly as more news about what is happening in Hong Kong becomes mainstream, then there is the other far more important thing, do you think for one moment that Trump will not use this to his advantage in some way? the guy is a master of 4D chess, so i seriously doubt this is going to blow over any time soon, and it would not surprise me in the least if Blizzard is considered to be a 'sacrificial' piece in said 4D chess game. :/
    Politicians are just real life reddit threads. They work on upvotes/downvotes just the same and jump from topic to topic to farm karma. 
    PhryYashaXHatefullAlBQuirky
  • elveoneelveone Member RarePosts: 268
    I think it's a bit hypocritical for a company that's prospered due to a democratic system to kowtow at the behest of Chinese censorship to protect their business interests. Ultimately, however, I'm glad they banned the player, and not because I think he should be punished for breaking any rules or using a platform that's been created for something in a way it wasn't meant to be utilized. I'm glad because banning him has, without a doubt, drawn an even greater attention to the contentious relationship between Hong Kong and China for people who might not otherwise know or give a damn.

    As to answer the thread, in the position they've put themselves, I think they might have to make a hard choice between an ethical dilemma and a capital dilemma. Which is more important to them? I wouldn't even pretend to say I could confidently make that judgement with the information I have as an outsider.
    Is it really an ethical dilemma when you can do nothing about the situation? Blizzard are not to blame for what is happening in Hong Kong and actually the only thing they could do about it was to remove the video in question and play the bad guys in order to incite public outrage. Not that they did it for that reason but that was really also the best way to gather support for the cause.
  • BizkitNLBizkitNL Member RarePosts: 2,510
    edited October 10
    This whole outcry right now is plain wrong. The more days go by, the more misinformation is being spread. It's hilarious.

    The rules they set for that tournament (and any other tournament) is to keep things neutral. Amongst other things, you are not to embarass Blizzard, it's sponsors or affiliates or any other parties while attending the tournament.

    Even though the player's cause is just and right, that is not a reason to simply break the rules he agreed to in the first place.

    And now, the internet is all over it like the latest anti-game-corporation outrage, misusing reasons as freedom of speech, claiming Blizzard is in China's pocket. It's a hilarious shitshow that just shows how stupid people are on the internet.
    mbrodieelveoneYashaXHatefullAlBQuirkyphoenixfire2
    10
  • LawlmonsterLawlmonster Member UncommonPosts: 1,085
    edited October 10
    elveone said:
    I think it's a bit hypocritical for a company that's prospered due to a democratic system to kowtow at the behest of Chinese censorship to protect their business interests. Ultimately, however, I'm glad they banned the player, and not because I think he should be punished for breaking any rules or using a platform that's been created for something in a way it wasn't meant to be utilized. I'm glad because banning him has, without a doubt, drawn an even greater attention to the contentious relationship between Hong Kong and China for people who might not otherwise know or give a damn.

    As to answer the thread, in the position they've put themselves, I think they might have to make a hard choice between an ethical dilemma and a capital dilemma. Which is more important to them? I wouldn't even pretend to say I could confidently make that judgement with the information I have as an outsider.
    Is it really an ethical dilemma when you can do nothing about the situation? Blizzard are not to blame for what is happening in Hong Kong and actually the only thing they could do about it was to remove the video in question and play the bad guys in order to incite public outrage. Not that they did it for that reason but that was really also the best way to gather support for the cause.
    I agree, I think it may be true that playing the bad guy in this situation might have been their best maneuver to incite outrage, like you and I have both mentioned in our posts. However, I do believe it's an ethical dilemma for a company who's prospered in a democratic system to allow a foreign, authoritarian censorship to determine what can or can't be said on their platform for the sake of protecting financial interests. 

    "This is life! We suffer and slave and expire. That's it!" -Bernard Black (Dylan Moran)

  • PhryPhry Member LegendaryPosts: 11,004
    Utinni said:
    Phry said:
    Utinni said:
    They'll just ride this out. Keyboard activists who haven't batted an eye over HK until now will forget in a week or two when they have something else to be pseudo-righteous about. Expecting them to fold on the majority of their customers because one guy decided to soapbox on their stream is insanity. 
    I think its more a case of public awareness, if this hadn't raised public awareness about Hong Kong and China, then i seriously doubt the Politicians would have become involved, but because the subject matter is related to human rights, it becomes an emotive one, particularly as more news about what is happening in Hong Kong becomes mainstream, then there is the other far more important thing, do you think for one moment that Trump will not use this to his advantage in some way? the guy is a master of 4D chess, so i seriously doubt this is going to blow over any time soon, and it would not surprise me in the least if Blizzard is considered to be a 'sacrificial' piece in said 4D chess game. :/
    Politicians are just real life reddit threads. They work on upvotes/downvotes just the same and jump from topic to topic to farm karma. 
    I can see you didn't understand it, but imagine what you could do if public sentiment made possible actions that were previously unthinkable, if you think small then you get small, i don't think Trump thinks small, and i doubt he would hesitate to sacrifice Blizzard in the process.  ;)
  • mbrodiembrodie Member RarePosts: 1,481
    Blizzard needs todo nothing, the guy broke the rules, he got punished.

    Too bad, move on
    PhryelveoneHatefullAlBQuirky
  • mbrodiembrodie Member RarePosts: 1,481
    edited October 10
    Utinni said:
    They'll just ride this out. Keyboard activists who haven't batted an eye over HK until now will forget in a week or two when they have something else to be pseudo-righteous about. Expecting them to fold on the majority of their customers because one guy decided to soapbox on their stream is insanity. 
    god this 100% sums up my thoughts on the situation...

    the exact same people "deleting" their bnet accounts and boycotting blizzard right now, will be at blizzcon in 3 weeks suckling at blizzards teet, then in morale outrage because blizzard can't restore the accounts these people deleted during a tantrum.

    BizkitNL said:
    This whole outcry right now is plain wrong. The more days go by, the more misinformation is being spread. It's hilarious.

    The rules they set for that tournament (and any other tournament) is to keep things neutral. Amongst other things, you are not to embarass Blizzard, it's sponsors or affiliates or any other parties while attending the tournament.

    Even though the player's cause is just and right, that is not a reason to simply break the rules he agreed to in the first place.

    And now, the internet is all over it like the latest anti-game-corporation outrage, misusing reasons as freedom of speech, claiming Blizzard is in China's pocket. It's a hilarious shitshow that just shows how stupid people are on the internet.
    and people posting up all the companies that tencent owns as if it's some kind of conspiracy... news flash they own shares in almost everything... it's old news but somehow relevant now because they own shares in blizzard too.

    the internet has gone full helmet wearing drooler on this one... it's ridiculous.

    My favorite one is, they are censoring my freedoms by making the games censored in their region....

    I'm sorry, you fucking what?

    the cost of doing international business is adhering to international laws and ratings boards and sometimes censoring things. it's not a new concept, it's not encroaching anyones freedom.
    PhryelveoneAlBQuirky
  • PhryPhry Member LegendaryPosts: 11,004
    mbrodie said:
    Utinni said:
    They'll just ride this out. Keyboard activists who haven't batted an eye over HK until now will forget in a week or two when they have something else to be pseudo-righteous about. Expecting them to fold on the majority of their customers because one guy decided to soapbox on their stream is insanity. 
    god this 100% sums up my thoughts on the situation...

    the exact same people "deleting" their bnet accounts and boycotting blizzard right now, will be at blizzcon in 3 weeks suckling at blizzards teet, then in morale outrage because blizzard can't restore the accounts these people deleted during a tantrum.

    BizkitNL said:
    This whole outcry right now is plain wrong. The more days go by, the more misinformation is being spread. It's hilarious.

    The rules they set for that tournament (and any other tournament) is to keep things neutral. Amongst other things, you are not to embarass Blizzard, it's sponsors or affiliates or any other parties while attending the tournament.

    Even though the player's cause is just and right, that is not a reason to simply break the rules he agreed to in the first place.

    And now, the internet is all over it like the latest anti-game-corporation outrage, misusing reasons as freedom of speech, claiming Blizzard is in China's pocket. It's a hilarious shitshow that just shows how stupid people are on the internet.
    and people posting up all the companies that tencent owns as if it's some kind of conspiracy... news flash they own shares in almost everything... it's old news but somehow relevant now because they own shares in blizzard too.

    the internet has gone full helmet wearing drooler on this one... it's ridiculous.

    My favorite one is, they are censoring my freedoms by making the games censored in their region....

    I'm sorry, you fucking what?

    the cost of doing international business is adhering to international laws and ratings boards and sometimes censoring things. it's not a new concept, it's not encroaching anyones freedom.
    Sophistry, i wonder why you are trying to change the argument so badly, could it be that you are going to be impacted in some way? 
    If in some way you are then you are certainly lower in my estimation.  :/
    elveoneAlBQuirky
  • XasapisXasapis Member RarePosts: 6,337
    I find it hilarious that Blizzard is in the forefront of easy mode activism fiddling with the sexual orientation of their characters each time bad press is about to affect them.

    I don't think that the pushback would be so big if they weren't such massive hypocrites, moralising from their high seats when their bottom lines were not in the line.

    I think this is my last post. This site seems to have become openly hostile to candid discourse since the change of management. A pity.
    vandal5627
  • elveoneelveone Member RarePosts: 268
    elveone said:
    I think it's a bit hypocritical for a company that's prospered due to a democratic system to kowtow at the behest of Chinese censorship to protect their business interests. Ultimately, however, I'm glad they banned the player, and not because I think he should be punished for breaking any rules or using a platform that's been created for something in a way it wasn't meant to be utilized. I'm glad because banning him has, without a doubt, drawn an even greater attention to the contentious relationship between Hong Kong and China for people who might not otherwise know or give a damn.

    As to answer the thread, in the position they've put themselves, I think they might have to make a hard choice between an ethical dilemma and a capital dilemma. Which is more important to them? I wouldn't even pretend to say I could confidently make that judgement with the information I have as an outsider.
    Is it really an ethical dilemma when you can do nothing about the situation? Blizzard are not to blame for what is happening in Hong Kong and actually the only thing they could do about it was to remove the video in question and play the bad guys in order to incite public outrage. Not that they did it for that reason but that was really also the best way to gather support for the cause.
    I agree, I think it may be true that playing the bad guy in this situation might have been their best maneuver to incite outrage, like you and I have both mentioned in our posts. However, I do believe it's an ethical dilemma for a company who's prospered in a democratic system to allow a foreign, authoritarian censorship to determine what can or can't be said on their platform for the sake of protecting financial interests. 
    Except Blizzard did set the rules against political speech on tournaments and I think those rules are just fine. When you choose to break the rules you should be ready to take the consequences. Just because the political message is something we agree with doesn't mean that rules should not be enforced. The neutral stance according to the rules that Blizzard themselves have set would be to uphold said rules and not to break them in favor of a political view. Also breaking those rules would be equal to financial suicide in this case which would make whoever does it liable for prosecution.
    AlBQuirky
  • PhryPhry Member LegendaryPosts: 11,004
    elveone said:
    elveone said:
    I think it's a bit hypocritical for a company that's prospered due to a democratic system to kowtow at the behest of Chinese censorship to protect their business interests. Ultimately, however, I'm glad they banned the player, and not because I think he should be punished for breaking any rules or using a platform that's been created for something in a way it wasn't meant to be utilized. I'm glad because banning him has, without a doubt, drawn an even greater attention to the contentious relationship between Hong Kong and China for people who might not otherwise know or give a damn.

    As to answer the thread, in the position they've put themselves, I think they might have to make a hard choice between an ethical dilemma and a capital dilemma. Which is more important to them? I wouldn't even pretend to say I could confidently make that judgement with the information I have as an outsider.
    Is it really an ethical dilemma when you can do nothing about the situation? Blizzard are not to blame for what is happening in Hong Kong and actually the only thing they could do about it was to remove the video in question and play the bad guys in order to incite public outrage. Not that they did it for that reason but that was really also the best way to gather support for the cause.
    I agree, I think it may be true that playing the bad guy in this situation might have been their best maneuver to incite outrage, like you and I have both mentioned in our posts. However, I do believe it's an ethical dilemma for a company who's prospered in a democratic system to allow a foreign, authoritarian censorship to determine what can or can't be said on their platform for the sake of protecting financial interests. 
    Except Blizzard did set the rules against political speech on tournaments and I think those rules are just fine. When you choose to break the rules you should be ready to take the consequences. Just because the political message is something we agree with doesn't mean that rules should not be enforced. The neutral stance according to the rules that Blizzard themselves have set would be to uphold said rules and not to break them in favor of a political view. Also breaking those rules would be equal to financial suicide in this case which would make whoever does it liable for prosecution.
    Well Blizzard is just reaping what they sowed, and financial suicide is just about assured by their actions, their rules are a joke and the sorry excuses that people use to try and defend Blizzard are laughable, pure comedy. As for being liable for prosecution, you clearly have no knowledge of the law or the judicial process, because someone who did would never make such a ludicrous statement. :p
  • YashaXYashaX Member EpicPosts: 2,415
    BizkitNL said:
    This whole outcry right now is plain wrong. The more days go by, the more misinformation is being spread. It's hilarious.

    The rules they set for that tournament (and any other tournament) is to keep things neutral. Amongst other things, you are not to embarass Blizzard, it's sponsors or affiliates or any other parties while attending the tournament.

    Even though the player's cause is just and right, that is not a reason to simply break the rules he agreed to in the first place.

    And now, the internet is all over it like the latest anti-game-corporation outrage, misusing reasons as freedom of speech, claiming Blizzard is in China's pocket. It's a hilarious shitshow that just shows how stupid people are on the internet.

    Saying a few unoffensive words in support of maintaining the rights of millions of people should not be seen as embarassing or damaging to an image or brand (unless your brand is authoritarianism- is that what Blizzard supports?)
    Lawlmonstervandal5627
    ....
  • LawlmonsterLawlmonster Member UncommonPosts: 1,085
    elveone said:
    elveone said:
    I think it's a bit hypocritical for a company that's prospered due to a democratic system to kowtow at the behest of Chinese censorship to protect their business interests. Ultimately, however, I'm glad they banned the player, and not because I think he should be punished for breaking any rules or using a platform that's been created for something in a way it wasn't meant to be utilized. I'm glad because banning him has, without a doubt, drawn an even greater attention to the contentious relationship between Hong Kong and China for people who might not otherwise know or give a damn.

    As to answer the thread, in the position they've put themselves, I think they might have to make a hard choice between an ethical dilemma and a capital dilemma. Which is more important to them? I wouldn't even pretend to say I could confidently make that judgement with the information I have as an outsider.
    Is it really an ethical dilemma when you can do nothing about the situation? Blizzard are not to blame for what is happening in Hong Kong and actually the only thing they could do about it was to remove the video in question and play the bad guys in order to incite public outrage. Not that they did it for that reason but that was really also the best way to gather support for the cause.
    I agree, I think it may be true that playing the bad guy in this situation might have been their best maneuver to incite outrage, like you and I have both mentioned in our posts. However, I do believe it's an ethical dilemma for a company who's prospered in a democratic system to allow a foreign, authoritarian censorship to determine what can or can't be said on their platform for the sake of protecting financial interests. 
    Except Blizzard did set the rules against political speech on tournaments and I think those rules are just fine. When you choose to break the rules you should be ready to take the consequences. Just because the political message is something we agree with doesn't mean that rules should not be enforced. The neutral stance according to the rules that Blizzard themselves have set would be to uphold said rules and not to break them in favor of a political view. Also breaking those rules would be equal to financial suicide in this case which would make whoever does it liable for prosecution.
    I think they would be fine under certain circumstances, that's probably where we disagree. Some rules deserve to be broken, and I think this is one of those times where, like you've pointed out, breaking those rules serves Blizzard in both enforcing a policy and increasing exposure to what has the potential to become a humanitarian crisis. I don't think it puts them in any less of an ethical dilemma, and it doesn't look good. That's what most people are reacting to since the Hearthstone ban, I think, how ugly it appears.

    "This is life! We suffer and slave and expire. That's it!" -Bernard Black (Dylan Moran)

  • PhryPhry Member LegendaryPosts: 11,004
    YashaX said:
    BizkitNL said:
    This whole outcry right now is plain wrong. The more days go by, the more misinformation is being spread. It's hilarious.

    The rules they set for that tournament (and any other tournament) is to keep things neutral. Amongst other things, you are not to embarass Blizzard, it's sponsors or affiliates or any other parties while attending the tournament.

    Even though the player's cause is just and right, that is not a reason to simply break the rules he agreed to in the first place.

    And now, the internet is all over it like the latest anti-game-corporation outrage, misusing reasons as freedom of speech, claiming Blizzard is in China's pocket. It's a hilarious shitshow that just shows how stupid people are on the internet.

    Saying a few unoffensive words in support of maintaining the rights of millions of people should not be seen as embarassing or damaging to an image or brand (unless your brand is authoritarianism- is that what Blizzard supports?)
    What is also telling is that Blizzard employees are not on board with this either, they have been staging protests of their own against the management. :/
    DMKanoRhoklawYashaX
This discussion has been closed.