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Upgrading Motherboard.

immodiumimmodium Member RarePosts: 2,576
I'll be upgrading my motherboard, cpu and ram next month and was wondering if I need to format my hard drive or I can just plug and play?

I watched this video and they make it sound so simple.


According to the video all I have to do is make sure I've associated my Windows license to my account. There's no mention of uninstalling any drivers related to the motherboard.

Is that true? I can just whip out the old motherboard, stick in the new one and windows will boot up happily and install needed drivers?

image

Comments

  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 6,826
    edited May 20
    You can try....

    I've never got so lucky in real life. Even when I have got a previous installation to boot up, the old drivers seem to conflict and cause issues and I ended up reinstalling anyway.

    Of all the things you do in a motherboard swap, honestly, re-installing Windows is the least painful of the experiences (if you have your data set up and backed up correctly).

    Motherboard swap is 75% of the work of building a new computer out right, but without the satisfaction of having an entire new computer. 
    immodiumTorval
  • BloodaxesBloodaxes Member RarePosts: 4,126
    Honestly, unless you don't want to do it, it's always good from time to time to format and reinstall everything. With time the system can get slower.
    immodiumTorval

  • TorvalTorval Member LegendaryPosts: 19,659
    I highly recommend at least reinstalling Windows. You don't have to do a destructive format but it's the cleanest path. Make sure you back up your documents, pictures, music, and such first. Make sure the backup is good. The only thing worse than not backing up your data is thinking you're backing it up and aren't.

    If that's out of the way ensure the license key is tied to your Microsoft account. You can check that in Win10 activation settings. It is very helpful to have the license key too. I have moved a key from an OEM Acer motherboard to a retail ASROCK. The previous key was tied to my account but I still had to call Microsoft support to have them clear activation. Having the written key was handy to have and made the process go quickly.

    Ridelynn's point about Windows being the easiest part was true for me. The part I enjoy least is applying thermal compound. If your case is easy to work with it can make all the difference in the world between raging frustrating and a chill afternoon playing with a screwdriver and connectors. If your old case sucks or is proprietary and doesn't fit the new board I would consider getting a new case as well (if budget allows).

    immodium
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  • TillerTiller Member EpicPosts: 7,983
    edited May 20
    I had this same question, the answer, it's more convoluted than you think and not worth the time it  takes to do it properly.



    Also key transfer is iffy. I'm not sure you can do it over the phone anymore. Watch this Linus Tech tips, he explains it.




    Torvalimmodium


  • immodiumimmodium Member RarePosts: 2,576
    Probably go with a complete format of my SSD then. Only got Windows and a few games on it. All important stuff documents etc are on separate HDD.

    I upgraded from Windows 7 to 10. When I reinstall 7 with the CD will it update to version 10? I have linked my license with my Microsoft account.

    image
  • TillerTiller Member EpicPosts: 7,983
    edited May 20
    immodium said:
    Probably go with a complete format of my SSD then. Only got Windows and a few games on it. All important stuff documents etc are on separate HDD.

    I upgraded from Windows 7 to 10. When I reinstall 7 with the CD will it update to version 10? I have linked my license with my Microsoft account.
    Your license is now a windows 10 license, though you can go back still I think. Best thing you could do is create a USB windows media install and install a fresh copy that way. Trust me, you'll thank me later.



    immodiumTorvalGrunty


  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 20,979
    I would recommend that you reinstall.  What I've done is to install to a different SSD and get that up and working, then plug the old SSD into the computer and copy files over.  That way, the file transfer happens at SSD speeds.
    immodiumSandmanjw
  • TEKK3NTEKK3N Member RarePosts: 719
    immodium said:
    I'll be upgrading my motherboard, cpu and ram next month and was wondering if I need to format my hard drive or I can just plug and play?

    I watched this video and they make it sound so simple.

    Just plug and play, no need to format.
    Though if you have sensible data, you might want to make a back up, in case you mess up the installation (really unlikely).
    The hard drive is the easiest hardware to install, not much different than plugging an external hard drive.

    Usually the Windows license is associated with the hard drive itself (my case) or your Windows account (which I don't use).
    Worst that can happen you will have to re-register Windows on the new machine (5 minutes process).
    As long as Windows is associated with one machine only, you are good to go.
    immodium
  • OzmodanOzmodan Member EpicPosts: 9,499
    Tiller said:
    I had this same question, the answer, it's more convoluted than you think and not worth the time it  takes to do it properly.



    Also key transfer is iffy. I'm not sure you can do it over the phone anymore. Watch this Linus Tech tips, he explains it.



    Yep you can still do it over the phone, just did it for my gf a couple months ago.
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