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Link me a new computer from Amazon under 800

2

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  • MyrdynnMyrdynn Member RarePosts: 2,434
    edited December 2018
    Quizzical said:
    Where does it say that it's overheating?  Or does it just shut off and you assume that it was due to overheating?

    Post the complete system specs of what you have.  Include the power supply, motherboard, case, storage, and everything else.  If you don't know what power supply or motherboard you have, then open up the case and read the label.

    Also, check all of your fans while the computer is running to make sure that they're spinning.  That includes fans for the case, power supply, video card, case, CPU, and any other fans that you happen to have in the system.  A simple visual check is all you need, but it has to be while the computer is running.

    A CPU overheating would commonly lead to throttling, not a complete shutdown.  A power supply overheating could cause a complete shutdown, but that would be strange unless it's a caused by airflow gone wrong, such as if the power supply fan has died.  Speaking of which, if the power supply fan failed, that would explain your symptoms.
    after it shuts off, I turn it back on and it says cpu shutoff for overheat press f1

    Quizz I am going to try to send you my Dxdiag

  • MyrdynnMyrdynn Member RarePosts: 2,434
    I am not sure if that worked I tried to attach a file

  • MyrdynnMyrdynn Member RarePosts: 2,434
    ok well here it is its long, sorry not sure how to do it otherwise

    AMD Phenom II X6 1100T Black Edition Thuban 6-Core 3.3GHz, 3.7GHz Turbo Socket AM3 125W HDE00ZFBGRBOX Desktop ...

    Rosewill RV2-700 700W ATX12V v2.3 / EPS12V SLI Ready Power Supply

    ASUS M4A87TD EVO AM3 AMD 870 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX AMD Motherboard

      Card name: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti
            Manufacturer: NVIDIA
               Chip type: GeForce GTX 1050 Ti
                DAC type: Integrated RAMDAC
             Device Type: Full Device
              Device Key: Enum\PCI\VEN_10DE&DEV_1C82&SUBSYS_A45419DA&REV_A1

  • MyrdynnMyrdynn Member RarePosts: 2,434
    Cleffy said:
    -Retracted- Only 1 new one was in stock and is now gone, remaining are used.

    That said, for $800 I can probably do better if I selected the parts myself.
    this is where I am going, my vid card is fine, I think I need to replace the PS, the motherboard and the processor, and according to above the ram, I think I can do that all on about 500

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,096
    That says that you have both a Radeon HD 6800 series video card and also a GeForce GTX 1050 Ti.  If they're both physically in the box, then I'd remove the former.  If you already did, then you may have neglected to uninstall drivers for it.  I'm not sure exactly what DxDiag checks, whether it's looking at drivers or more directly looking at hardware to query what is attached to a given PCI Express slot or SATA port or whatever.

    Your DxDiag file doesn't say what power supply you have.  It also can't tell you whether any of your fans have failed.  There's a decent chance that a dead fan is your only real problem here, so do check that.

    It's also possible that the problem is with a heatsink.  If your heatsink is caked in dust, that can cause overheating.  A visual check doesn't necessary pick that up, but blowing on it (preferably with a can of compressed air if you have it) will.  It's also possible that your CPU heatsink isn't mounted properly, and you need to remove it, reapply thermal paste, and reattach it.

    Your problems sound like they're solvable without needing to replace the computer by a new one that won't be that much better than the old.  Anyway, I think that you should:

    1)  Find out what power supply you have and report it here.
    2)  Remove the Radeon HD 6850 or 6870 that you have, whether physically, by uninstalling drivers, or whatever DxDiag is picking up.
    3)  Check to ensure that all fans are working--including case fans, CPU fan, video card fan(s), and power supply fan.
    4)  Check for excessive dust, as that's a common culprit for overheating.

    I've seen a situation before where it was "oh no my computer is dying because the CPU is overheating", and blowing on the CPU heatsink with some compressed air fixed the problem entirely.  That's a lot cheaper than buying a new computer.

    Also, for completeness, make sure that you're not blocking any airflow such as having case air vents physically against a wall so that no air can go through.  You're probably not, but occasionally, you get someone who doesn't realize that that matters.
    PhryGdemami
  • MyrdynnMyrdynn Member RarePosts: 2,434
    that DXdiag was when I was trying to run 2 I have removed and uninstalled the original

    I have taken everything apart, cleaned it with air and put it back together, as I use it right now every fan is running, the PSU is clean and running.  The temperature gauge is moving so I know its reading but its never even going above 85, so its not actually overheating

    I have had this computer 8 years, since I built it and it just about 3 months ago started doing this, its been in the same spot for years, and never had issues

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,096
    You posted your power supply while I was typing the above post.  Thank you for providing that requested information.

    I would definitely replace that power supply, regardless of what else you do.  It's possible that the power supply is your entire problem.

    Among other things:

    1)  It's not 80 PLUS certified at all.  Certification doesn't guarantee that a power supply is good, but the lack of it just about guarantees that it's bad.
    2)  It's a "700 W" power supply with only two PCI Express connectors, one of which is only 6-pin.  That makes it nearly impossible to pull 700 W from it without running something way out of spec, so the manufacturer surely doesn't expect it to be able to actually deliver 700 W.

    It's possible that a power supply going bad is your entire problem.  Something like this would rule that out, and may fix the problem entirely:

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151204

    That's only $45 after rebate, including shipping.
  • MyrdynnMyrdynn Member RarePosts: 2,434
    edited December 2018
    also it does it the minute I start to play a game, if I just use it for the interweb it doesn't ever shut down, but even very low graphic games like Titan's Quest is causing an overheat prompt

    it started doing it before I replaced the video card, fwiw, I assumed that it was a graphics card issue initially, I also bought another PSU and when I was installing it, it didn't have the right plugs, so I sent it back and put it back on the shelf


  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,096
    I'd try replacing just the power supply first and see if that fixes the problem.  If not, then we can look into also replacing the motherboard, CPU, and memory.  And add an SSD while you're at it, as if you're going to upgrade, you might as well upgrade to something decent.
  • MyrdynnMyrdynn Member RarePosts: 2,434
    edited December 2018
    thanks man, and thanks to everyone, I guess I need a new one anyways, so going to start there.  How do I know if it has the right plugs?

    also do I only need a 450?
  • MyrdynnMyrdynn Member RarePosts: 2,434
    edited December 2018
    Quizzical said:
    I'd try replacing just the power supply first and see if that fixes the problem.  If not, then we can look into also replacing the motherboard, CPU, and memory.  And add an SSD while you're at it, as if you're going to upgrade, you might as well upgrade to something decent.
    how do I add an SSD?  also add one to my cart for me lol

    and do I bother with the extended warranty?  I never usually do 8$
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,096
    You don't seem like the sort who might realistically plug in a high end video card someday.  If you did, I'd go for 650 W on the power supply.  But for a rig that will never pull 300 W from its power supply, 450 W is adequate.  If you do want a higher wattage power supply, then here you go:

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151202

    As for an SSD, I'm not sure how familiar with them you are.  They're used like hard drives, except that they're massively faster.  Here's 500 GB from a good brand for $65:

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820156173

    Ideally, it would be nice to do a clean install of Windows on the SSD, and then copy data over.  It is possible to clone your hard drive onto an SSD, but various things can go wrong if you try that.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,096
    edited December 2018
    Myrdynn said:
    Quizzical said:
    I'd try replacing just the power supply first and see if that fixes the problem.  If not, then we can look into also replacing the motherboard, CPU, and memory.  And add an SSD while you're at it, as if you're going to upgrade, you might as well upgrade to something decent.
    how do I add an SSD?  also add one to my cart for me lol

    and do I bother with the extended warranty?  I never usually do 8$
    On many products, the extended warranty is nothing more than a way to give the seller extra money for something you'll never use.  I don't really blame the vendor for offering it, but you don't want it.  The power supply that I linked has a 7 year warranty, anyway.
  • MyrdynnMyrdynn Member RarePosts: 2,434
    edited December 2018
    perfect thanks will order them tomorrow, maybe get a couple new little fans too

    one more question on that SSD, how do I plug it in?
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,096
    Myrdynn said:
    perfect thanks will order them tomorrow, maybe get a couple new little fans too

    one more question on that SSD, how do I plug it in?
    With a SATA cable, the same way you'd plug in a hard drive.  As with a hard drive, you need to plug in both the SATA data and power cables.

    Your computer is old enough that your case likely doesn't have a mounting place for an SSD.  But SSDs are resilent, so you could just leave it sitting loose in the case and it will be fine, at least so long as you don't put it up against something hot.  It also works to just duct tape it to the side of the case or something like that, though they might not appreciate your having done so if you need to RMA it.  I once had one SSD physically sitting on top of another but otherwise loose in the case for about two years.
  • MyrdynnMyrdynn Member RarePosts: 2,434
    edited December 2018
    ok so I need an extra sata cable then? or do I remove the hard drive

    maybe I should just build the whole thing at once

    I am only up to 159$, what options for a CPU/MB and RAM to keep it under 500?
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,096
    Myrdynn said:
    ok so I need an extra sata cable then? or do I remove the hard drive

    maybe I should just build the whole thing at once

    I am only up to 159$, what options for a CPU/MB and RAM to keep it under 500?
    It's likely that there's another SATA cable that came with your motherboard.  Check your motherboard box unless it was a prebuilt computer.  If you don't happen to have another SATA cable laying around, you can buy one for a few dollars.

    I'd check first to see if a new power supply fixes your problem before moving on to a new CPU, motherboard, and memory.
  • PhryPhry Member LegendaryPosts: 11,004
    Myrdynn said:
    that DXdiag was when I was trying to run 2 I have removed and uninstalled the original

    I have taken everything apart, cleaned it with air and put it back together, as I use it right now every fan is running, the PSU is clean and running.  The temperature gauge is moving so I know its reading but its never even going above 85, so its not actually overheating

    I have had this computer 8 years, since I built it and it just about 3 months ago started doing this, its been in the same spot for years, and never had issues

    85 is fairly high, technically a GPU could run that high but i wouldn't class that as normal, if your CPU is running over 65c then that is a problem in itself and maybe renewing the thermal paste will help?
  • MyrdynnMyrdynn Member RarePosts: 2,434
    85 f not c
  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,060
    edited December 2018
    85F would be an awesomely cool temp, it’s barely over ambient.

    Most setups will idle around 95-110F (35-40C), and under load run anywhere from 150-200F (65-85C). A good water cooled rig may run around 40C under load.

    Most components start to have issues past about 85C
    Post edited by Ridelynn on
  • VrikaVrika Member EpicPosts: 6,422
    I think there's some fault somewhere if your CPU temperature gauge never goes above 85 Fahrenheit.

    Good coolers can keep the CPU temperature in less than 30 Celsius when it's idling, but when it's under heavy load it should jump to somewhere between 40-50 Celsius even if you've got a good cooler. If you measure less than 30 Celsius under load that makes it sound like there's a problem somewhere.
     
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,096
    Myrdynn said:
    ok so I need an extra sata cable then? or do I remove the hard drive

    maybe I should just build the whole thing at once

    I am only up to 159$, what options for a CPU/MB and RAM to keep it under 500?
    For what it's worth, if you do decide to go with a new CPU, motherboard, and memory to bring the total up to $500, you can go with a Ryzen 5 2600 for about $170, a Socket AM4 motherboard with a B450 chipset for about $80, and 16 GB of DDR4 memory for about $100.
  • MyrdynnMyrdynn Member RarePosts: 2,434
    Vrika said:
    I think there's some fault somewhere if your CPU temperature gauge never goes above 85 Fahrenheit.

    Good coolers can keep the CPU temperature in less than 30 Celsius when it's idling, but when it's under heavy load it should jump to somewhere between 40-50 Celsius even if you've got a good cooler. If you measure less than 30 Celsius under load that makes it sound like there's a problem somewhere.

    I just played some POE and I don't have a single extra cooler in it, my temperature gage went about half way between the 86 and the 122

  • VrikaVrika Member EpicPosts: 6,422
    Myrdynn said:
    Vrika said:
    I think there's some fault somewhere if your CPU temperature gauge never goes above 85 Fahrenheit.

    Good coolers can keep the CPU temperature in less than 30 Celsius when it's idling, but when it's under heavy load it should jump to somewhere between 40-50 Celsius even if you've got a good cooler. If you measure less than 30 Celsius under load that makes it sound like there's a problem somewhere.

    I just played some POE and I don't have a single extra cooler in it, my temperature gage went about half way between the 86 and the 122

    Ok, that sounds normal.

    My comment was based on your earlier message about it never even going above 85 Fahrenheit - that would have been abnormally low.
     
  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,060
    Are you positive that’s reading in F? Most computer monitors default to C.
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