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does this setup make sense?

majimaji Member UncommonPosts: 2,091
Hi there.

All my computer parts, but for my SSD, are older than 4 years, so it seems to be time for an upgrade (also, I want to be able to play games on high details again). I'm not rich, but got some money to spend, so I thought about this:

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 313
ram Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB (2x8GB) DDR4 3000MHz
Mainboard: Gigabyte X470 Aorus Gaming 7 WIFI
Cooler: Noctua NH-U12S (AM4)
HD Samsung SSD 860 Pro (512 GB)
Case: Fractal Design Define R6 TGE (Tempered Glass Edition)
Graphics card: Palit GeForce GTX 1070 Ti JetStream

I still got a good power supply left, as well as some good screens and mouse and whatnot.

Thanks for any advice.

Let's play Fallen Earth (blind, 300 episodes)

Let's play Guild Wars 2 (blind, 45 episodes)

Comments

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,452
    edited October 2018
    Whether it makes sense to buy depends tremendously on the prices you're looking at paying.  At suitable prices, it could be a perfectly reasonable purchase.

    What power supply do you have that you're looking at reusing?
    blueturtle13
  • OzmodanOzmodan Member EpicPosts: 9,581
    Looks like a good setup, but I am not that high on the 470 motherboards, a dual graphics board system causes more issues than it solves any.
    Phry
  • majimaji Member UncommonPosts: 2,091
    Thanks for the replies. Currently all that combined would be about 1400 to 1500€ (including taxes and whatnot) on a first check. The power supply I got... I'm not sure what it was called. It had great reviews when I bought it, and produces reliably a lot of power. The only other stuff I'd add would be a soundcard for 5.1 sound.

    Let's play Fallen Earth (blind, 300 episodes)

    Let's play Guild Wars 2 (blind, 45 episodes)

  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 6,898
    Nearly every motherboard packaged and sold outside of an OEM includes decent 5.1 sound onboard, and many gaming specific boards are 7.1 with isolated circuitry that are as good as 90% of anything discrete you could buy.

    if you want to make a big difference in your audio quality, spend it on a good amp and/or speakers. Sound card won’t net you any significant difference unless you already have some pretty high end output equipment to be able to notice it.
    blueturtle13Jean-Luc_PicardAsm0deus
  • thowansthowans Member CommonPosts: 4
    Hi. Yeah, very nice gaming rig. I'd make something quite similar if I wanted the new gaming PC.
  • DMKanoDMKano Member LegendaryPosts: 21,947
    Why not go with an m2 drive instead?

    It is literally 4x faster at almost the same price. I looked at the mobo and it does support m2 drives
    blueturtle13GdemamiTrolldefender99
  • Jean-Luc_PicardJean-Luc_Picard Member LegendaryPosts: 8,076
    Ridelynn said:
    if you want to make a big difference in your audio quality, spend it on a good amp and/or speakers.
    Definitely. Get rid of any sound card except for your microphone/headset if you need one and use a home theater receiver through HDMI for main sound. Not only sound quality will be superior, but once you've started playing games with 5.1 or better speakers, you can't go back ;)
    "The ability to speak doesn't make you intelligent" - Qui-gon Jinn in Star Wars.
    After many years of reading Internet forums, there's no doubt that nor does the ability to write.
    CPU: Core I7 9700k (4.90ghz) - GPU: Gigabyte GTX 980 Ti G1 Gaming - RAM: 16GB Kingston HyperX Savage DDR4 3000 - Motherboard: Gigabyte Z390 Aorus Ultra - PSU: Antec TruePower New 750W - Storage: Kingston KC1000 NVMe 960gb SSD and 2x1TB WD Velociraptor HDDs (Raid 0) - Main display: Philips 40PUK6809 4K 3D TV - Second display: Philips 273v 27" gaming monitor - VR: Pimax 8K headset and Razer Hydra controllers - Soundcard: Sony STR-DH550 AV Receiver HDMI linked with the GPU and the TV, with Jamo S 426 HS 3 5.0 speakers and Pioneer S-21W subwoofer - OS: Windows 10 Pro 64 bits.

  • GdemamiGdemami Member EpicPosts: 11,867
    DMKano said:
    Why not go with an m2 drive instead?

    It is literally 4x faster at almost the same price. I looked at the mobo and it does support m2 drives
    m2 is just just a form factor designation, it has nothing to do with speed of connected device.

    OP:
    CPU, MB, Samsung SSD and cooler are "luxury" components rather than smart buy.
    Siris23FlyByKnight
  • ConnmacartConnmacart Member UncommonPosts: 717
    Let's break it down aesthetically

    CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 
    
ram Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB (2x8GB) DDR4 3000MHz - Black I presume
    Mainboard: Gigabyte X470 Aorus Gaming 7 WIFI - Very orangy with leds
    Cooler: Noctua NH-U12S (AM4) - Beige, brown, poop color
    HD Samsung SSD 860 Pro (512 GB) - Black
    Case: Fractal Design Define R6 TGE (Tempered Glass Edition), Black and white.
    Graphics card: Palit GeForce GTX 1070 Ti JetStream - Black, grey

    So the view inside won't be very pretty in my opinion. You could either go non window, or switch the cooler for something like bequiet Dark Rock 4, which should be priced similarly and get the Black Out edition for the R6.
    The Noctua cooler also might not have much room for overclocking. It can cool the 2700x on stock no doubt, but it might run warmer than preferred due to the R6 being focused on silence and not airflow. 

    Also any particular reason you want the Pro version instead of the Evo for the SSD? You aren't going to notice the difference while playing games. Also an M.2 won't be faster unless it is NVME, which are more expensive by quite a bit. Sata through a Sata cable or through M.2 Sata remains the same.

    Otherwise the specs are sound.
  • Asm0deusAsm0deus Member EpicPosts: 3,061
    edited November 2018
    Why are you getting a cooler? Doesn't the 2700x come with the wraith cooler?  Are you planning on overclocking?

    The wraith is just fine if running the 2700x at stock speed or even with a mild/med OC, you should probably only buy a better cooler if you plan on doing a heavier OC.


    Normally I would link you to HardOCP but they messed up their review of the wraith prism as the reviewer didn't notice the fan speed selector switch on the side the the heatsink so did all his testing with the fan on "low" speed...lol

    Brenics ~ Just to point out I do believe Chris Roberts is going down as the man who cheated backers and took down crowdfunding for gaming.

    case: Coolermaster HAF932
    PSU: Antec EA 750watt
    RAM: 4x2g G-SKILL DDR3-1600mhz 9-9-9-24
    Mb:Gigabyte GA-P55-UD4P
    CPU: i5-750 @4ghz
    GPU: gtx msi N760 TF 2GD5/OC
    cooling: Noctua NH-D14
    storage: seagate 600 240GB SSD, samsung evo 860 500gb SSD, 500GB x7200rpm HDD


  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,452
    This thread was created in October, and the original poster likely isn't still following it.
    Phrygervaise1
  • Siris23Siris23 Member UncommonPosts: 372
    edited November 2018
    Gdemami said:
    DMKano said:
    Why not go with an m2 drive instead?

    It is literally 4x faster at almost the same price. I looked at the mobo and it does support m2 drives
    m2 is just just a form factor designation, it has nothing to do with speed of connected device.

    OP:
    CPU, MB, Samsung SSD and cooler are "luxury" components rather than smart buy.
    this is just wrong

    2.5" SSDs are SATA devices and are limited to SATA speeds (550ish MB/s)

    M.2 uses a PCIe 4x lane which is way faster (1500-3500ish MB/s depending on brand)
    Gdemami
  • VrikaVrika Member EpicPosts: 6,029
    Asm0deus said:
    Why are you getting a cooler? Doesn't the 2700x come with the wraith cooler?  Are you planning on overclocking?

    The wraith is just fine if running the 2700x at stock speed or even with a mild/med OC, you should probably only buy a better cooler if you plan on doing a heavier OC.


    Normally I would link you to HardOCP but they messed up their review of the wraith prism as the reviewer didn't notice the fan speed selector switch on the side the the heatsink so did all his testing with the fan on "low" speed...lol

    A better cooler also runs a lot quieter.

    How much each of us cares about that is a personal preference.
     
  • ConnmacartConnmacart Member UncommonPosts: 717
    Siris23 said:
    Gdemami said:
    DMKano said:
    Why not go with an m2 drive instead?

    It is literally 4x faster at almost the same price. I looked at the mobo and it does support m2 drives
    m2 is just just a form factor designation, it has nothing to do with speed of connected device.

    OP:
    CPU, MB, Samsung SSD and cooler are "luxury" components rather than smart buy.
    this is just wrong

    SSDs are SATA devices and are limited to SATA speeds (550ish MB/s)

    M.2 uses a PCIe 4x lane which is way faster (1500-3500ish MB/s depending on brand)
    No he is right. It depends on the ssd if it uses sata or pcie when use get a M.2 ssd
  • Asm0deusAsm0deus Member EpicPosts: 3,061
    Vrika said:
    Asm0deus said:
    Why are you getting a cooler? Doesn't the 2700x come with the wraith cooler?  Are you planning on overclocking?

    The wraith is just fine if running the 2700x at stock speed or even with a mild/med OC, you should probably only buy a better cooler if you plan on doing a heavier OC.


    Normally I would link you to HardOCP but they messed up their review of the wraith prism as the reviewer didn't notice the fan speed selector switch on the side the the heatsink so did all his testing with the fan on "low" speed...lol

    A better cooler also runs a lot quieter.

    How much each of us cares about that is a personal preference.
    Yes I know, it goes in with are you OCing, if not then sound will probably not be an issue.

    Brenics ~ Just to point out I do believe Chris Roberts is going down as the man who cheated backers and took down crowdfunding for gaming.

    case: Coolermaster HAF932
    PSU: Antec EA 750watt
    RAM: 4x2g G-SKILL DDR3-1600mhz 9-9-9-24
    Mb:Gigabyte GA-P55-UD4P
    CPU: i5-750 @4ghz
    GPU: gtx msi N760 TF 2GD5/OC
    cooling: Noctua NH-D14
    storage: seagate 600 240GB SSD, samsung evo 860 500gb SSD, 500GB x7200rpm HDD


  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,452
    Technically, M.2 is just a form factor.  Or rather, M.2 2280 is a form factor, though there are other lengths such as M.2 22110 or M.2 2260.  (The nomenclature is that 2280 is a 22 mm x 80 mm PCB, and so forth.)  If the M.2 connection is over SATA, then it's just a SATA SSD in a different form factor.  If the M.2 connection is over PCI Express, then it could have much higher bandwidth available.

    But it's not guaranteed to have higher bandwidth.  If the SSD controller can only do 400 MB/sec, then that's all you get, whether you're using SATA or PCI-E.  I don't know of any PCI-E controllers with such low bandwidth used in M.2 SSDs, but some of them are only around 1 GB/sec, while others are closer to 3 GB/sec.  SATA has become enough of a bottleneck that all of the modern SATA SSDs (with the possible exception of some low end junk that I missed) offer performance in the ballpark of 500 MB/sec, but performance of PCI-E over M.2 SSDs varies a lot more widely.

    Of course, that extra bandwidth only matters if the SSD is the bottleneck.  These days, it usually isn't.  The big jump was going from about 100 IOPS on a hard drive to tens of thousands on an SSD.  For consumer software, the difference between 500 MB/sec on SATA and 3 GB/sec on a high-end M.2 over PCI-E 3.0 x4 SSD is sometimes a rounding error too small to measure and sometimes measurable but still small.

    There are some applications where the difference between 3 GB/sec over PCI-E and 500 MB/sec over SATA makes an enormous difference.  But that tends to be arcane enterprise stuff; I'm not aware of any widely-used consumer application where that makes a big difference.
  • Siris23Siris23 Member UncommonPosts: 372
    Siris23 said:
    Gdemami said:
    DMKano said:
    Why not go with an m2 drive instead?

    It is literally 4x faster at almost the same price. I looked at the mobo and it does support m2 drives
    m2 is just just a form factor designation, it has nothing to do with speed of connected device.

    OP:
    CPU, MB, Samsung SSD and cooler are "luxury" components rather than smart buy.
    this is just wrong

    SSDs are SATA devices and are limited to SATA speeds (550ish MB/s)

    M.2 uses a PCIe 4x lane which is way faster (1500-3500ish MB/s depending on brand)
    No he is right. It depends on the ssd if it uses sata or pcie when use get a M.2 ssd
    most people I know refer to 2.5" SATA SSDs as SSDs and M.2 as M.2, but I clarified my original post.

    The drive the OP listed is a SATA drive, so an M.2 would be several times faster.
    Gdemami
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,452
    For what it's worth, my own experience with M.2 SSDs has been very bad.  After testing various things and doing RMAs, the possibilities are:

    1)  Both of the SSDs that New Egg shipped to me were completely defective.
    2)  Both of the NVMe slots in my motherboard are completely defective.
    3)  Either Gigabyte or Mushkin didn't follow the specification and an entire SKU is categorically defective.
    4)  NVMe is still immature and very hit and miss as to whether a motherboard and SSD will work together.
    5)  Making it work requires doing something beyond just plugging it in like you would with SATA.

    People tend to tell me that it's not (5), but I have no idea which of the others is the problem.  Either (1) or (2) could be simply terrible luck for me, but low probability events like those do happen sometimes.
    Panther2103Gdemami
  • VrikaVrika Member EpicPosts: 6,029
    Asm0deus said:
    Vrika said:
    Asm0deus said:
    Why are you getting a cooler? Doesn't the 2700x come with the wraith cooler?  Are you planning on overclocking?

    The wraith is just fine if running the 2700x at stock speed or even with a mild/med OC, you should probably only buy a better cooler if you plan on doing a heavier OC.


    Normally I would link you to HardOCP but they messed up their review of the wraith prism as the reviewer didn't notice the fan speed selector switch on the side the the heatsink so did all his testing with the fan on "low" speed...lol

    A better cooler also runs a lot quieter.

    How much each of us cares about that is a personal preference.
    Yes I know, it goes in with are you OCing, if not then sound will probably not be an issue.
    Even if you don't care about lower noise levels, that doesn't mean no-one else would care. There are plenty of people who place their computers in their living rooms, want to also do quiet work on the computer, want to minimize background noise to get better audio experience, etc.
     
  • gervaise1gervaise1 Member EpicPosts: 6,775
    Siris23 said:
    Gdemami said:
    DMKano said:
    Why not go with an m2 drive instead?

    It is literally 4x faster at almost the same price. I looked at the mobo and it does support m2 drives
    m2 is just just a form factor designation, it has nothing to do with speed of connected device.

    OP:
    CPU, MB, Samsung SSD and cooler are "luxury" components rather than smart buy.
    this is just wrong

    SSDs are SATA devices and are limited to SATA speeds (550ish MB/s)

    M.2 uses a PCIe 4x lane which is way faster (1500-3500ish MB/s depending on brand)
    No he is right. It depends on the ssd if it uses sata or pcie when use get a M.2 ssd
    I think what @DMKano was suggesting is to just get an M.2 NVMe. Which is quickly just being called "M.2".

    To be precise however M.2 is indeed a "form factor" change which had tablets in mind. within the specification there are different options e.g. 2280 (pretty common) which denotes 22mm wide and 80mm long. 

    NVMe was a "functional" change that replaced the previous SATA limitations for the much faster PCIe transfer rates.

    PCIe storage appeared a few years ago, plugged directly into PCIe slots but didn't catch on because they were expensive. 

    M.2 NVMe combines both. Things only took off once motherboard manufacturers allocated space and added a slot their boards - typically 22mm wide with 110 mm being the format's maximum length. Adaptors - that fit in a PCIe slot - are now available potentially allowing older motherboards to M.2 NVMe (but check firmware support).

    The market potential of PCs / servers combined with that of tablets has encouraged manufacturers to invest in new production methods in particular multi-layering. Samsung, for example, put 48 layers on their M.2 NVMe which are 2.34mm thick. (M.2 format allows up to 3mm). Multi-layering has enabled much greater capacities e.g. 2TB to be achieved.

    Several companies have also taken the opportunity to develop new controller designs - spurred on by the faster transfer rates available - as well as pursue enhanced energy efficiency. (Intel's latest designs are as power efficient as hard drives in idle mode.)

    An M.3 standard - basically allowing multiple M.2s to be combined to get to 16Tb (for servers today!) has been agreed.

    So large capacity, much faster, prices falling as production and sales have increased, power efficient, easy to fit

    (Fitting one of these is super simple - easier than memory, graphics card, ssd etc. Undo 1 screw from the riser in the m/b - usually set for 80mm long units. If the unit is say 60 or 110mm long you will need to move it to the appropriate hole in the m/b. Place the tiny card into the m/b slot at about a 45 degree angle - you just place it basically. Then you use the screw to secure it to the  m/b - the end will have a half moon notch). 
  • Asm0deusAsm0deus Member EpicPosts: 3,061
    edited November 2018
    Vrika said:
    Asm0deus said:
    Vrika said:
    Asm0deus said:
    Why are you getting a cooler? Doesn't the 2700x come with the wraith cooler?  Are you planning on overclocking?

    The wraith is just fine if running the 2700x at stock speed or even with a mild/med OC, you should probably only buy a better cooler if you plan on doing a heavier OC.


    Normally I would link you to HardOCP but they messed up their review of the wraith prism as the reviewer didn't notice the fan speed selector switch on the side the the heatsink so did all his testing with the fan on "low" speed...lol

    A better cooler also runs a lot quieter.

    How much each of us cares about that is a personal preference.
    Yes I know, it goes in with are you OCing, if not then sound will probably not be an issue.
    Even if you don't care about lower noise levels, that doesn't mean no-one else would care. There are plenty of people who place their computers in their living rooms, want to also do quiet work on the computer, want to minimize background noise to get better audio experience, etc.
    I didn't say otherwise so stop telling me shite I know ;)  Thing is most people say something if noise factor is super important when asking for help. I am guessing he thinks that the ryzen cooler are shite, as most of us know the intel ones are, which isn't so.

    For the record my PC is in my living room and my huge noctua, look down at my sig, isn't that noisy that we notice it and my PC is on 24/7. 

    Just saying noise level consideration wasn't a huge revelation so dunno why your acting like it is?

      I mean I thought that could maybe be the case but from the OP's tone it doesn't seem likely tbh.  If you had just quoted me and said or asked is noise a concern? I would have simply clicked agreed but you had to add that last line which frankly annoyed me. 

    Just saying your coming across preachy rather than constructive.

    Brenics ~ Just to point out I do believe Chris Roberts is going down as the man who cheated backers and took down crowdfunding for gaming.

    case: Coolermaster HAF932
    PSU: Antec EA 750watt
    RAM: 4x2g G-SKILL DDR3-1600mhz 9-9-9-24
    Mb:Gigabyte GA-P55-UD4P
    CPU: i5-750 @4ghz
    GPU: gtx msi N760 TF 2GD5/OC
    cooling: Noctua NH-D14
    storage: seagate 600 240GB SSD, samsung evo 860 500gb SSD, 500GB x7200rpm HDD


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