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Wait for 9th gen Intel?

PNM_JenningsPNM_Jennings Member UncommonPosts: 1,093
So my mobo is kinda on the way out and I should replace it soon. And while I'm replacing it there's kind of no good reason not to replace the cpu at the same time (I'm running an i5 2500k haha). So here's my question: would it be at all worth it to wait for the 9th gen Intel cpus or just upgrade to 8th gen now? Is the difference going to be significant enough that I'm better off waiting?
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Comments

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 24,851
    Do you really think that Sky Lake Refresh Refresh Refresh will be all that much better than Sky Lake Refresh Refresh?  Because while sixth generation Sky Lake was something new, all that Intel has been able to do since then is spin their wheels while waiting for their 10 nm process node to not work.

    Rumors say that the next refresh will offer 8 core CPUs, while their current mainstream lineup only goes up to 6 cores.  If you think those two extra cores are worth waiting for, then maybe you wait.  But otherwise, no.  If you wait for 10 nm, you'll likely be waiting at least another year for the low end dual cores, and likely longer for anything bigger than that.

    It's also worth mentioning that AMD CPUs are competitive now, and certainly the most competitive that they've been since Conroe arrived in 2006.  If you buy a Core i7 8700K for $350 from Intel or its successor in the refresh at likely a higher price tag, you can argue that it's a little better than what AMD offers if you put a high value on single-threaded performance.  But for anything below that, AMD offers a competitive product at a competitive price.  I'm not saying that you should definitely buy AMD, but only that it's worth considering, and available today as they recently refreshed their lineup.
    GorweOzmodan
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 24,851
    Torval said:

    Build what you want and what makes you feel comfortable, but I'd build now and not worry about Intel until Cannon Lake.
    I'm expecting Cannon Lake to be very laptop-focused parts, and probably laptops of the low performance, low power variety, at that.  That would be less interesting for desktops than Broadwell was.  If you want a good desktop part, you'll probably be waiting for the generation after that--until 2020 if you're lucky.
    [Deleted User]
  • Lightningstalk3rLightningstalk3r Member UncommonPosts: 13
    anything will do
  • gervaise1gervaise1 Member EpicPosts: 6,919
    i5 2500k .... Sandy Bridge ..... you might be able to get a 2nd hand motherboard that supports your current cpu but a new one - unlikey.

    Some extra questions to ponder.

    1. Memory.
    You didn't mention it but your current setup will have DDR3. Current builds use DDR4. Given your question I assume you don't want to look at older cpus + motherboards that support DDR3 - increasingly hard to get - but that does mean you will need to budget for new memory.

    2. Operating System.
    Windows is keyed to motherboards. Unless you are using a copy of Windows 10 that you purchased (or maybe Linux) you might end up having to buy another copy of Windows.  Suggest you check out your options. Motherboard only is one thing but if you change your cpu and memory .... suffice to say you might have to budget for an operating system as well. 

    3. If - as a result - you end up getting a motherboard ..... and a cpu, memory and operating system the obvious next questions are:

    Storage. If you have an SSD OK? If you don't ...... well SSDs, or NVMe's that are replacing them, will make a much bigger difference than i7 or i9 - budget for new storage?

    And Windows OEM copies - nominally - is suposed to come with new system but system builders usally have copies as well and will nominally sell with "upgrade parts". Not saying you can't get OEM copies on their own just how it is supposed to work.

    If you do end up looking at all of the above I would also ask whether you have an SSD. If you don;t the question becomes: are you really thinking about a new system?

    (SSDs - or the newer NVMe - being one of the single biggest improvements to system performance in the last several years.)

    If so the bugbear in the room is graphics cards. And - sadly - even if you have an "old" graphics card it may still represent "decent value". As in "the cost to get a decent improvement can be huge". 
  • HyperpsycrowHyperpsycrow Member RarePosts: 848
    With hardware speed of evolution, then you can wait your whole life.  I have a i7 7700k Kaby lake 4.2 OC 4.5 since i have no reason to OC it to 5 ghz yet.  Get ur selv a asus ROG mofo that fits your needs and this cpu, then ur fired up like me :D




  • centkincentkin Member RarePosts: 1,527
    The only thing you can be sure of is that they will continue changing the pin counts so you can't use new chips on old motherboards.

    If they remove hyperthreading from i7 that is just... really quite dumb.

  • Slapshot1188Slapshot1188 Member LegendaryPosts: 15,897
    I’m still rocking a 3570k overclocked to 4.2 I think (just air). Its sad how things seem to have stagnated.  If someone had told me 6 years ago that my same CPU would be running today’s games I would have laughed... yet it does... fairly well.  Even things like Star Citizen.

    All time classic  MY NEW FAVORITE POST!  (Keep laying those bricks)

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  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,375
    centkin said:

    If they remove hyperthreading from i7 that is just... really quite dumb.

    Sad that they aren’t keeping it since it was a small boost - I’d rather have the real core count than the HT cores, but I guess they have to do something to justify the existence of the i9 now...
  • PNM_JenningsPNM_Jennings Member UncommonPosts: 1,093
    So I'm seeing some people recommend AMD. So here's the details on what I'm thinking. I'm looking at the i5 8600k so I'm guessing the 5 2600X is the equivalent from AMD. Budget is around $400-500 though obviously lower is better. I would have to get a new heatsink and fan if I switched to AMD (current one supports 1151 not AM4). I'm using this exclusively for gaming.

    So. Is it worth investing a little more in a new hs+f? Or would the stock work? Which option will have the most longevity? I'm willing to take a small performance hit now to save me having to upgrade for an extra year or two. I assume no matter what (from what I can see) a 650W psu will be enough to handle the new cpu and a 970?

    Also just what about mobos? Because frankly I don't know what I'm looking for in either case. (Though I realize this question isn't really answerable until I decide whether to go with AMD or Intel.)
  • VrikaVrika Member LegendaryPosts: 7,591
    edited July 2018
    atticusbc said:
    So I'm seeing some people recommend AMD. So here's the details on what I'm thinking. I'm looking at the i5 8600k so I'm guessing the 5 2600X is the equivalent from AMD. Budget is around $400-500 though obviously lower is better. I would have to get a new heatsink and fan if I switched to AMD (current one supports 1151 not AM4). I'm using this exclusively for gaming.

    So. Is it worth investing a little more in a new hs+f? Or would the stock work? Which option will have the most longevity? I'm willing to take a small performance hit now to save me having to upgrade for an extra year or two. I assume no matter what (from what I can see) a 650W psu will be enough to handle the new cpu and a 970?

    Also just what about mobos? Because frankly I don't know what I'm looking for in either case. (Though I realize this question isn't really answerable until I decide whether to go with AMD or Intel.)
    What parts are included in that $400-500 budget?

    If you get new mobo + processor to replace I5 2500K, then you'll also need to get DDR4 RAM because you will have DDR3 which is not compatible with new processors and motherboards. Other parts you could likely keep.

    You do not need to buy a new cooler if you buy AMD, their stock coolers are good enough. You can always buy better cooler for overclocking, or to get the computer's noise level down, but you don't need to the stock cooler is ok. With Intel you should buy cooler separately their stock coolers are so bad.

    If you want to get cheap I'd suggest looking at I5-8400 + cheap motherboard + new RAM (because your old one isn't compatible) + using your existing cooler if you already have a good cooler for Intel. Something like this, you could still keep it in $400 even with having to purchase RAM  https://pcpartpicker.com/list/hW6hmq
      Disclaimer: That's meant as an example. I built that in less than 2 minutes


    EDIT: You don't need to worry about PSU power. I5 8600K and Ryzen 5 2600X both have same power draw as I5 2500K. That I5 8400 I'm recommending uses less power. Your PSU will be able to run them since it was able to run I5 2500K.

    EDIT 2: Do you have an SSD? If you don't have one already, then you could add ~500GB SSD to that example built I made, and still keep it in $500 budget
     
  • Lightningstalk3rLightningstalk3r Member UncommonPosts: 13
    any i7 series with 8000+ in it will be fine
    only standard processors though. 8400, 8500. not 8385, 8401.
    im sure most core processors work on video games. any technology bought in 2018+ should be fine to run any windows 10 game without talking

    works on all games. cost 500-900usd. cooling not included im sure with intel

    so that cooling will cost you about 125usd+you need a freeform foam plastic covering for your processor and make sure the metal doesnt cook your processor or holding for your computer.
  • gervaise1gervaise1 Member EpicPosts: 6,919
    @atticusbc ;  As I - and @Vrika - said above new stuff uses DDR4 memory. Presumably that will have to come out of your budget? And RAM prces have - and continue - to see increases in price same as graphics cards. There is also the question of operating system.

    As far as power supplies go 650W will power most systems out there. Processors, memory and storage have all moved to use less power.

    As far as AMD or Intel go - either will do. For current-generation parts (AMD Ryzen 2000 or Intel 8th Generation) it doesn't matter. 

    Remember / key point: for gaming the biggest limiting factor is - usually - the graphics card.

    So if you opt for Intel say any 8th gen i5, i3 or even a Pentium! will be a huge leap over what you have now. And the recent resurgence of AMD means that cpu prices don't scale in a linear fashion - so spending a bit more can reap huge gains in performance - but this can be a tweak when you make a final decision.

    If your budget will have to include memory - and operating system? - allow for those first. They are the same for AMD and Intel. When it comes to memory you can get different speeds, over-clocked etc. and there are sweet spots but - basically - decide whether you want 8Gb, 16Gb etc.,  try to make sure you have an upgrade option. Although that may come down to what motherboard you end up with.

    If this alters your budget then what I would then suggest is you create an AMD and an Intel system. 


    However your motherboard hasn't died! So - if you don't have an SSD in your system I would get one of those today and wait. (If you go with a new mobo then NVMe.)




  • PNM_JenningsPNM_Jennings Member UncommonPosts: 1,093
    Vrika said:

    you'll also need to get DDR4 RAM because you will have DDR3 which is not compatible with new processors and motherboards.
    Sonnofa- 

    So here's what I'm thinking right now. It's pushing the envelope a little bit, but I would prefer to invest a little more now than to have to reinvest again sooner. AMD 5 2600X for $230 (only $30ish more than a 8400 or 8500), and G Skill Ripjaw V 16GB DDR4 3200 for $170. I'll just use the stock fan.

    That just leaves the question of the motherboard unless someone finds fault with that setup. What I'm thinking is the Asus ROG Strix B350-F since it allows for overclocking (which I may or may not do in the future) but doesn't support SLI (which I have no intention of doing) for $125.

    That brings the total up to $525 which is on the high end of what I can afford, but I won't have to worry about upgrading again any time soon. What does the hive mind say?
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 24,851
    atticusbc said:
    So I'm seeing some people recommend AMD. So here's the details on what I'm thinking. I'm looking at the i5 8600k so I'm guessing the 5 2600X is the equivalent from AMD. Budget is around $400-500 though obviously lower is better. I would have to get a new heatsink and fan if I switched to AMD (current one supports 1151 not AM4). I'm using this exclusively for gaming.

    So. Is it worth investing a little more in a new hs+f? Or would the stock work? Which option will have the most longevity? I'm willing to take a small performance hit now to save me having to upgrade for an extra year or two. I assume no matter what (from what I can see) a 650W psu will be enough to handle the new cpu and a 970?

    Also just what about mobos? Because frankly I don't know what I'm looking for in either case. (Though I realize this question isn't really answerable until I decide whether to go with AMD or Intel.)
    If you go with a Ryzen 5 2600X as compared to a Core i5 8600K, then you'll get a little less CPU performance in single-threaded programs and a little more in programs that scale well to many cores.  That can also save you money in three ways:

    1)  directly, as the CPU is cheaper
    2)  cheaper motherboards if you want to get something nice, as AMD commonly charges less for their higher end chipsets than Intel, and motherboard manufacturers pass that cost along to you
    3)  no need to buy an aftermarket cooler, as AMD's stock cooler is comparable to a $30 aftermarket cooler

    It sounds like (3) might not apply to you.

    As for the power supply, a good quality 650 W power supply will be plenty for that setup unless you're into liquid nitrogen overclocking or something crazy like that.
  • PNM_JenningsPNM_Jennings Member UncommonPosts: 1,093
    @Quizzical Thanks. Any thoughts on the build I suggested above your response?
  • VrikaVrika Member LegendaryPosts: 7,591
    Quizzical said:
    atticusbc said:
    So I'm seeing some people recommend AMD. So here's the details on what I'm thinking. I'm looking at the i5 8600k so I'm guessing the 5 2600X is the equivalent from AMD. Budget is around $400-500 though obviously lower is better. I would have to get a new heatsink and fan if I switched to AMD (current one supports 1151 not AM4). I'm using this exclusively for gaming.

    So. Is it worth investing a little more in a new hs+f? Or would the stock work? Which option will have the most longevity? I'm willing to take a small performance hit now to save me having to upgrade for an extra year or two. I assume no matter what (from what I can see) a 650W psu will be enough to handle the new cpu and a 970?

    Also just what about mobos? Because frankly I don't know what I'm looking for in either case. (Though I realize this question isn't really answerable until I decide whether to go with AMD or Intel.)
    If you go with a Ryzen 5 2600X as compared to a Core i5 8600K, then you'll get a little less CPU performance in single-threaded programs and a little more in programs that scale well to many cores.  That can also save you money in three ways:
    I agree with Ryzen 5 2600X over I5 8600K. If you don't like my suggestion about I5 8400, then Ryzen 5 2600X is likely better price/performance than I5 8600K.

    But do you have an SSD? Your computer sounds so old that you might not have, and if you don't have one then I think saving with CPU to buy an SSD would be a good idea.
     
  • PNM_JenningsPNM_Jennings Member UncommonPosts: 1,093
    edited July 2018
    Vrika said:
    I agree with Ryzen 5 2600X over I5 8600K. If you don't like my suggestion about I5 8400, then Ryzen 5 2600X is likely better price/performance than I5 8600K.

    But do you have an SSD? Your computer sounds so old that you might not have, and if you don't have one then I think saving with CPU to buy an SSD would be a good idea.
    I liked the suggestion, but just looking at what things cost I think I'm okay spending the extra $30 for a little more power. I do have an SSD though. I upgrade things slowly as they fail.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 24,851
    Vrika said:
    Quizzical said:
    atticusbc said:
    So I'm seeing some people recommend AMD. So here's the details on what I'm thinking. I'm looking at the i5 8600k so I'm guessing the 5 2600X is the equivalent from AMD. Budget is around $400-500 though obviously lower is better. I would have to get a new heatsink and fan if I switched to AMD (current one supports 1151 not AM4). I'm using this exclusively for gaming.

    So. Is it worth investing a little more in a new hs+f? Or would the stock work? Which option will have the most longevity? I'm willing to take a small performance hit now to save me having to upgrade for an extra year or two. I assume no matter what (from what I can see) a 650W psu will be enough to handle the new cpu and a 970?

    Also just what about mobos? Because frankly I don't know what I'm looking for in either case. (Though I realize this question isn't really answerable until I decide whether to go with AMD or Intel.)
    If you go with a Ryzen 5 2600X as compared to a Core i5 8600K, then you'll get a little less CPU performance in single-threaded programs and a little more in programs that scale well to many cores.  That can also save you money in three ways:
    I agree with Ryzen 5 2600X over I5 8600K. If you don't like my suggestion about I5 8400, then Ryzen 5 2600X is likely better price/performance than I5 8600K.

    But do you have an SSD? Your computer sounds so old that you might not have, and if you don't have one then I think saving with CPU to buy an SSD would be a good idea.
    That's one way to bring the price tag down, but if you're going to do that, then you might as well compare it to the Ryzen 5 2600 (non-X), and get about the same comparison on price/performance as before.

    Upon further review, only the Ryzen 7 2700X gets the wraith prism cooler.  AMD's stock coolers for their cheaper CPUs aren't nearly as good.
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 24,851
    atticusbc said:
    @Quizzical Thanks. Any thoughts on the build I suggested above your response?
    What else do you have in your current build?  Give your full system specs, including the particular SSD, power supply, case, and so forth.
  • VrikaVrika Member LegendaryPosts: 7,591
    Quizzical said:
    Vrika said:
    Quizzical said:
    atticusbc said:
    So I'm seeing some people recommend AMD. So here's the details on what I'm thinking. I'm looking at the i5 8600k so I'm guessing the 5 2600X is the equivalent from AMD. Budget is around $400-500 though obviously lower is better. I would have to get a new heatsink and fan if I switched to AMD (current one supports 1151 not AM4). I'm using this exclusively for gaming.

    So. Is it worth investing a little more in a new hs+f? Or would the stock work? Which option will have the most longevity? I'm willing to take a small performance hit now to save me having to upgrade for an extra year or two. I assume no matter what (from what I can see) a 650W psu will be enough to handle the new cpu and a 970?

    Also just what about mobos? Because frankly I don't know what I'm looking for in either case. (Though I realize this question isn't really answerable until I decide whether to go with AMD or Intel.)
    If you go with a Ryzen 5 2600X as compared to a Core i5 8600K, then you'll get a little less CPU performance in single-threaded programs and a little more in programs that scale well to many cores.  That can also save you money in three ways:
    I agree with Ryzen 5 2600X over I5 8600K. If you don't like my suggestion about I5 8400, then Ryzen 5 2600X is likely better price/performance than I5 8600K.

    But do you have an SSD? Your computer sounds so old that you might not have, and if you don't have one then I think saving with CPU to buy an SSD would be a good idea.
    That's one way to bring the price tag down, but if you're going to do that, then you might as well compare it to the Ryzen 5 2600 (non-X), and get about the same comparison on price/performance as before.
    I think you're right. A month ago I5 8400 was still cheaper than Ryzen 5 2600, but it looks like they've swapped positions with I5 8400 price increasing and Ryzen 5 2600 price decreasing.

    My info was outdated, and Ryzen 5 2600 would likely be better price/performance than I5 8400.

    Sorry for posting outdated info.
     
  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,375
    The SSD question here is the most important one in my opinion.
  • PNM_JenningsPNM_Jennings Member UncommonPosts: 1,093
    edited July 2018
    Quizzical said:
    atticusbc said:
    @Quizzical Thanks. Any thoughts on the build I suggested above your response?
    What else do you have in your current build?  Give your full system specs, including the particular SSD, power supply, case, and so forth.
    Ahaha! It is mostly pretty old so don't drag me. :smile:

    Case: Antec 300 Illusion ATX
    Fan: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus
    PSU: Corsair Enthusiast TX 650W 
    HDD: Seagate 2TB
    SSD: Samsung 850 EVO 500GB
    GPU: MSI GTX 970
    Current motherboard: Asrock P67 Extreme4
    Current CPU: Intel i5-2500k
    Current RAM: GSkill Ripjaw DDR3 4x4GB
    Also an ASUS DVD burner

    EDIT: And since I always want to learn, the SSD is an issue because of bottlenecking right?
  • DarkswormDarksworm Member RarePosts: 1,071
    edited July 2018
    Quizzical said:
    Do you really think that Sky Lake Refresh Refresh Refresh will be all that much better than Sky Lake Refresh Refresh?  Because while sixth generation Sky Lake was something new, all that Intel has been able to do since then is spin their wheels while waiting for their 10 nm process node to not work.

    Rumors say that the next refresh will offer 8 core CPUs, while their current mainstream lineup only goes up to 6 cores.  If you think those two extra cores are worth waiting for, then maybe you wait.  But otherwise, no.  If you wait for 10 nm, you'll likely be waiting at least another year for the low end dual cores, and likely longer for anything bigger than that.

    It's also worth mentioning that AMD CPUs are competitive now, and certainly the most competitive that they've been since Conroe arrived in 2006.  If you buy a Core i7 8700K for $350 from Intel or its successor in the refresh at likely a higher price tag, you can argue that it's a little better than what AMD offers if you put a high value on single-threaded performance.  But for anything below that, AMD offers a competitive product at a competitive price.  I'm not saying that you should definitely buy AMD, but only that it's worth considering, and available today as they recently refreshed their lineup.
    The single thread performance is what kills AMD vs. Intel for me.  I've tried too many times to go for AMD cause of the lower cost, but they always felt worse than Intel.  I wouldn't buy an AMD for gaming, personally.  I'd buy it for something like a Video Editing RIG, where you can take advantage of the greater core count at lower cost and actually come out with a benefit vs. comparable (but higher costing Intel CPUs).

    AMD also tends to have better iGPUs than Intel, which is good for workloads where you can use the iGPU for Display and dGPU for Compute (i.e. Video Editing with DaVinci Resolve).

    Aside from that, I don't touch AMD.

    I also feel like more software is optimized with a bias for Intel/Nvidia, which results in software running better on their CPUs.  Anything that supports CUDA tends to de facto run better on Nvidia than Intel/AMD OpenCL.

    I didn't even consider AMD when I bought my new machine a few months ago.  I've already been bitten by their laggard single thread performance, multiple times, and I feel their support lifecycle for products is not as good as Intel or Nvidia's.
    OzmodanGaeluian
  • DarkswormDarksworm Member RarePosts: 1,071
    edited July 2018

    Vrika said:
    Quizzical said:
    atticusbc said:
    So I'm seeing some people recommend AMD. So here's the details on what I'm thinking. I'm looking at the i5 8600k so I'm guessing the 5 2600X is the equivalent from AMD. Budget is around $400-500 though obviously lower is better. I would have to get a new heatsink and fan if I switched to AMD (current one supports 1151 not AM4). I'm using this exclusively for gaming.

    So. Is it worth investing a little more in a new hs+f? Or would the stock work? Which option will have the most longevity? I'm willing to take a small performance hit now to save me having to upgrade for an extra year or two. I assume no matter what (from what I can see) a 650W psu will be enough to handle the new cpu and a 970?

    Also just what about mobos? Because frankly I don't know what I'm looking for in either case. (Though I realize this question isn't really answerable until I decide whether to go with AMD or Intel.)
    If you go with a Ryzen 5 2600X as compared to a Core i5 8600K, then you'll get a little less CPU performance in single-threaded programs and a little more in programs that scale well to many cores.  That can also save you money in three ways:
    I agree with Ryzen 5 2600X over I5 8600K. If you don't like my suggestion about I5 8400, then Ryzen 5 2600X is likely better price/performance than I5 8600K.

    But do you have an SSD? Your computer sounds so old that you might not have, and if you don't have one then I think saving with CPU to buy an SSD would be a good idea.
    A 512GB SATA3 SSD costs only $109.99, these days (the 3D NAND Ultra from SanDisk).  Samsung 500GB EVOs are barely more expensive (maybe $15 or so).

    That is not something I'd save money on a CPU to get, especially when you can jut get a 120-250GB SSD for dirt cheap for your OS and then run your games off of a 7,200 RPM Drive (probably the same one currently in the system).  Honestly, FireCuda 5.400 RPM SSDs are fine to run games off of.  I've done it.  They basically outperform most 7,200 RPM drives.  The SSD is only really a big deal if you want instant-load times in some types of games (ARPGs, Competitive Shooters like OW where you want to insta-lock your Hero, etc.).

    If the OP is that hard up for cash, chances are he cannot afford an SSD big enough to be used as a gaming drive, anyways.  Games are coming in at 50-100GB+, these days.  You'd need a 1-2TB SSD to comfortably use it for that; and I'd argue that the ardent gamer basically needs 2GB to start (unless you want to constantly manage this the way people with 500GB XBO's were, before external storage support was added).  This is why a lot of Gaming PCs and laptops ship with Smaller SSD for System/Apps + Large HDD/SSHD for Data/Game Storage (and why almost all gaming laptops have dual drive bays).

    Which CPU you get also depends on what applications you run other than the games, as well.  This will change the general gist of what you're saying, when factored in.  Currently, the suggestions are based on fairly one-dimensional assumptions and considerations.  This also applies to GPUs, as some applications bias heavily in favor of CUDA or OpenCL, and this determines which brand of GPU you get for your build.

    Everything depends on how you plan to use the PC, Gaming or otherwise.
  • VrikaVrika Member LegendaryPosts: 7,591
    atticusbc said:
    Quizzical said:
    atticusbc said:
    @Quizzical Thanks. Any thoughts on the build I suggested above your response?
    What else do you have in your current build?  Give your full system specs, including the particular SSD, power supply, case, and so forth.
    Ahaha! It is mostly pretty old so don't drag me. :smile:

    Case: Antec 300 Illusion ATX
    Fan: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus
    PSU: Corsair Enthusiast TX 650W 
    HDD: Seagate 2TB
    SSD: Samsung 850 EVO 500GB
    GPU: MSI GTX 970
    Current motherboard: Asrock P67 Extreme4
    Current CPU: Intel i5-2500k
    Current RAM: GSkill Ripjaw DDR3 4x4GB
    Also an ASUS DVD burner

    EDIT: And since I always want to learn, the SSD is an issue because of bottlenecking right?
    If you have an SSD, then it's not an issue. Any SSD is good enough.

    But if you don't have SSD, there are many situations where the computer is less responsive because it has to load stuff from slow HDD, and SSDs are already cheap enough that getting an SSD to any but cheapest computer builds should be a no-brainer.
     
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