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New computer time

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  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,664
    What a mess.  It's perhaps a good thing that this isn't the first time I tried to build a computer.  If it had been, it would surely also have been the last.

    On the bright side, I've now got the replacement hardware.  Unfortunately, the replacement SSD doesn't work, either.  I've tried updating the motherboard BIOS, as well as tinkering with settings there, which didn't help.  Either both m.2 slots on the motherboard are dead, both SSDs I was sent are dead on arrival, or else the motherboard isn't compatible with the SSD for some arcane reason.

    So I decided to just do a clean install of Windows 10 on a SATA SSD instead.  Partway into installation, Windows needed to reboot, as is normal.  And after the reboot, it changed its mind and decided that it couldn't be installed on my SSD.  After deleting all of the partitions, it finally accepted it and installed.

    Then it came time to update Windows.  That took several hours.  It got the updates to almost done very quickly, and then went slow.  Really, really slow.  But it finally finished.

    I've tried to install the video drivers three times.  All three times failed with a "general error".  Basically, it didn't work and AMD has no idea why.  When I try to install the video drivers again, the installation program can't even launch.

    Now Edge can connect to the Internet and Opera can't.  I uninstalled Opera to try reinstalling it, but the installation program won't run.  Trying to reboot the computer also hangs.  Even when it's not hanging, it's really, really slow.  Task Manager says it's basically idle, however.

    Sometimes when Windows hasn't been updated in a long time, it wants to take a very long time to update and get everything in order.  That might be all that's going on.  Or I might have somehow gotten malware by having an old version of Windows 10 installed until I could patch it.

    So I unplugged the new computer and plugged the old one back in.  All of this plugging things in and unplugging them seems to have broken my speakers, so that they only intermittently register as being plugged in.  I'm not sure if the problem is with the speakers or the motherboard.
    PhryTorvalGdemami
  • OzmodanOzmodan Member EpicPosts: 9,726
    I have had issues building PCs, but that just sounds like something out of a horror movie.  I have not used any Gigabyte motherboards building AMD PCs.  I pretty much stick with ASUS although I have done a few MSI ones.  

    And yes, I had to find out the hard way that HDMI will not support 144 refresh rates.

    I have not had any issues with M2 drives to date.  I never buy anything off of Newegg, my local Microcenter will match price for me and immediately replace anything defective.    
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,664
    At the moment, I'm thinking that the Windows 10 problem might be one of trying to install the original version of it and rely on Windows Update to do about three years of patches all at once.  Windows Update doesn't always like trying to patch too far at once.  It looks like Microsoft has a tool to let you create a new installation USB stick and install the latest version directly, so I'm going to try that.

    My best guess on the speaker problem is that it's dust getting in and interfering with the connection.  There certainly was a lot of dust back there.  The speakers seem to work fine this morning.
    Phry
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,664
    Well, I've got it working.  Mostly.  It's still the case that nothing can recognize the existence of the M.2 SSD.  But other than that, it works.

    I used an the old SATA SSD to install Windows that I bought for the new computer three years ago.  The old speakers work with the new computer, too.

    Apparently Eyefinity didn't work with the latest 18.8.1 AMD GPU drivers, but it did work with the older 18.5 drivers.  The moral of the story is not to fuss with beta drivers unless you have to.

    I'm pretty sure that I was right about last night's problem being a bad Windows installation.  The moral of the story is, don't reuse old Windows installation media and then rely on Windows Update.  If you're going to do a clean install, go to Microsoft's site, get the media creation tool, and install the latest version with all the patches already applied directly.
  • MMOman101MMOman101 Member UncommonPosts: 1,710
    I just checked again, but on my motherboard if the M.2 spot was installed it would turn of one of my PCI slots.  I wonder if your MB turns of the M.2 slot if a device is plugged into a specific PCI slot. 

    I suspect you checked this already, but in case you did not. 
    Torval

    “It's unwise to pay too much, but it's worse to pay too little. When you pay too much, you lose a little money - that's all. When you pay too little, you sometimes lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do. The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot - it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run, and if you do that you will have enough to pay for something better.”

    --John Ruskin







  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,664
    MMOman101 said:
    I just checked again, but on my motherboard if the M.2 spot was installed it would turn of one of my PCI slots.  I wonder if your MB turns of the M.2 slot if a device is plugged into a specific PCI slot. 

    I suspect you checked this already, but in case you did not. 
    While I haven't empirically tested that, it really shouldn't be the case.  The only PCI Express slot with anything in it is the one with the dedicated x16 connection to the CPU.  The video card pretty much has to go in that slot as it's the only way to get full bandwidth.  For that to be shared with something else other than another PCI Express slot (e.g., to allow x8/x8 rather than a single x16) would be creatively awful design.

    Additionally, there are two M.2 slots on my motherboard.  One has a dedicated x4 connection to the CPU.  The other uses an x2 connection split off of the chipset.  The design of the Ryzen CPUs is such that there is a dedicated x4 connection coming off of the CPU socket intended to be used for an M.2 SSD.  It would be astoundingly awful design for that to be shared with anything.  The other M.2 slot might well have some shared bandwidth somewhere, but again, I'm not using any PCI express slots other than the one for the video card.
  • MMOman101MMOman101 Member UncommonPosts: 1,710
    Quizzical said:
    MMOman101 said:
    I just checked again, but on my motherboard if the M.2 spot was installed it would turn of one of my PCI slots.  I wonder if your MB turns of the M.2 slot if a device is plugged into a specific PCI slot. 

    I suspect you checked this already, but in case you did not. 
    While I haven't empirically tested that, it really shouldn't be the case.  The only PCI Express slot with anything in it is the one with the dedicated x16 connection to the CPU.  The video card pretty much has to go in that slot as it's the only way to get full bandwidth.  For that to be shared with something else other than another PCI Express slot (e.g., to allow x8/x8 rather than a single x16) would be creatively awful design.

    Additionally, there are two M.2 slots on my motherboard.  One has a dedicated x4 connection to the CPU.  The other uses an x2 connection split off of the chipset.  The design of the Ryzen CPUs is such that there is a dedicated x4 connection coming off of the CPU socket intended to be used for an M.2 SSD.  It would be astoundingly awful design for that to be shared with anything.  The other M.2 slot might well have some shared bandwidth somewhere, but again, I'm not using any PCI express slots other than the one for the video card.
    My mother board does not share the x16, it shares the x4.  I was not sure if you had any other cards in your system.  If you only have a video card int the x16 slot I can't imagine it would be an issue. 
    Torval

    “It's unwise to pay too much, but it's worse to pay too little. When you pay too much, you lose a little money - that's all. When you pay too little, you sometimes lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do. The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot - it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run, and if you do that you will have enough to pay for something better.”

    --John Ruskin







  • t0nydt0nyd Member UncommonPosts: 521
    I always put the heatsink on before mounting the mobo. Back in the day you could never trust the backplate to line up with the cutout.

  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,146
    t0nyd said:
    I always put the heatsink on before mounting the mobo. Back in the day you could never trust the backplate to line up with the cutout.

    I don’t fault you on this, but I would hate to try it on something like an Asrock. Most decent HSF or WBs weigh a good bit, and those boards are flimsy like cardboard.
    Torval
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