Quantcast

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

New PC build, modest budget

13»

Comments

  • petedopetedo Member CommonPosts: 10
    BTrayaL said:
    Thank you guys, I think I have pretty much finished editing the list, in the OP. I have taken into account your opinions, thank you for the help :)
    Did you misclicked when picking motherboard?
    http://pcpartpicker.com/part/gigabyte-motherboard-gab85hd3

    Or do you need mATX?
    http://pcpartpicker.com/part/msi-motherboard-b85meco


  • GdemamiGdemami Member EpicPosts: 12,175
    Another thing to note is that the EVGA PSU you chose also comes with a 10 year warranty (that can be important to many people).  It's up to you to choose the wiggle room of your PSU.  So, PCPartpicker states you will draw 298w with that configuration which should be at normal load.  When gaming, your CPU and GPU should pull a bit harder considering Turbo clock along with GPU boost.  At load your CPU may bump up from 85w to 100w and on the GPU side maybe 250w for a total of 350w at least for those two parts.  The more load you put on your PSU capacity the more heat and wear is added to the unit.  Then again you won't be bench marking 24/7/365 with a gaming PC, at least I hope not. lol


    What it comes down to is: make sure you get a PSU from a reliable manufacturer.  For this I recommend - Seasonic, Corsair (many products made by Seasonic), EVGA, Rosewill, and BeQuiet as reputable PSU manufacturers off the top of my head.  There are more out there, these are just the ones I trust overall.


    Try this PSU calculator if you like:

    http://www.bequiet.com/en/psucalculator

    298W at "normal load", 250W for GTX 960....
    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/nvidia-geforce-gtx-960,4038-8.html

    100W from 84W non-overclockable CPU is even more ignorant claim.


    Please do some research first, you are giving ill advice and mislead OP.
  • booniedog96booniedog96 Member UncommonPosts: 289
    edited August 2015
    Gdemami said

    298W at "normal load", 250W for GTX 960....
    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/nvidia-geforce-gtx-960,4038-8.html

    100W from 84W non-overclockable CPU is even more ignorant claim.


    Please do some research first, you are giving ill advice and mislead OP.
    The parts list rated the build at that mark,  the CPU and the GPU will make up the majority of the rating.  I don't know if that rating takes into account Turbo and Boost clock.  I know the CPU is an 85w part so 298-85=213.  213w sounds about right for an enthusiast lvl GPU.  The figures I gave for Turbo and boost is a bit over average to get a ball park number for gaming load.  It wasn't scientific - no, it does sound close to my past builds though, 350w draw is quite average for a gaming PC.

    With that in mind, the OP went to the link I had given and came out with a 550w unit with a 56% load and usually a PSU sweet spot for efficiency is at around 50% load.  So, now he has a 550w PSU and if he chose EVGA with 10 yr warranty he can transfer that PSU to his next build as long as it falls within tolerance.


    Post edited by booniedog96 on
  • GdemamiGdemami Member EpicPosts: 12,175
    edited August 2015
    Gdemami said

    298W at "normal load", 250W for GTX 960....
    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/nvidia-geforce-gtx-960,4038-8.html

    100W from 84W non-overclockable CPU is even more ignorant claim.


    Please do some research first, you are giving ill advice and mislead OP.
    The parts list rated the build at that mark,  the CPU and the GPU will make up the majority of the rating.  I don't know if that rating takes into account Turbo and Boost clock.  I know the CPU is an 85w part so 85-298=210.  210w sounds about right for an enthusiast lvl GPU.  The figures I gave for Turbo and boost is a bit over average to get a ball park number for gaming load.  It wasn't scientific - no, it does sound close to my past builds though, 350w draw is quite average for a gaming PC.

    With that in mind, the OP went to the link I had given and came out with a 550w unit with a 56% load and usually a PSU sweet spot for efficiency is at around 50% load.  So, now he has a 550w PSU and if he chose EVGA with 10 yr warranty he can transfer that PSU to his next build as long as it falls withing tolerance.



    You do not know whether TDP include boost.
    You completely ignore the fact that OP is using entirely different card and setup.

    Why bothering reading the link to find out about actual GTX 960 values, right? Why finding out about Boost and TDP? Why bothering to actually educate yourself  when you can make baseless, ignorant guess instead? 

    Who cares about facts and reason...
    Post edited by Gdemami on
  • booniedog96booniedog96 Member UncommonPosts: 289
    edited August 2015
    Gdemami said:

    Why bothering reading the link, right? Why bothering to actually educate yourself  instead of making baseless, ignorant guesses? Who cares about facts and reason...
    The fact is:

    The OP used a PSU calculator and came up with a decision for his PSU on his own.  He saw what was needed and made an educated decision based on facts.  I didn't tell him what he needed to buy.  His original choice was a really good 650w PSU - my train of thought is if he can afford to put it on his list then I won't say anything to change his mind.  I don't know what he has planned in the future.  What if he wanted to go big on his next rig 5yrs from now?  Having a 650w PSU (still under warranty) to crossover to a new rig could save him money if he was to do that.
    Post edited by booniedog96 on
  • booniedog96booniedog96 Member UncommonPosts: 289
    edited August 2015
    petedo said:
    Having a 4GB GPU is nice if you are into moding games and it's only about $20 more than a 2GB base 960 MSRP.  If the 4GB card had a $60 - $100 difference then it could be an issue but it's only an additional $10 per GDDR5 memory, that's a really good deal and it has a back plate to boot and a free copy of MGS5. 
    It is not $20 extra.

    Price of GTX 960 starts at $180, your pick of 4GB version is $230. That is $50 for 4GB. Definitely not a good deal, performance difference is negligable.
    The majority of those $180 cards are from savings via mail-in rebate so you will have to put up $200 - $210 to buy the card first, then you send the rebate back to the company and they mail you a check for $20 that you receive three months after purchase.

    Looking back at that part, it just dropped to $223 and includes a $20 mail-in rebate now.  With a back plate, With 2GB extra, With a copy of MGS5!!!

    Edit: scratch that, PcPartpicker totaled it wrong.  Still $229.98 :/

  • petedopetedo Member CommonPosts: 10
    petedo said:
    Having a 4GB GPU is nice if you are into moding games and it's only about $20 more than a 2GB base 960 MSRP.  If the 4GB card had a $60 - $100 difference then it could be an issue but it's only an additional $10 per GDDR5 memory, that's a really good deal and it has a back plate to boot and a free copy of MGS5. 
    It is not $20 extra.

    Price of GTX 960 starts at $180, your pick of 4GB version is $230. That is $50 for 4GB. Definitely not a good deal, performance difference is negligable.
    The majority of those $180 cards are from savings via mail-in rebate so you will have to put up $200 - $210 to buy the card first, then you send the rebate back to the company and they mail you a check for $20 that you receive three months after purchase.

    Looking back at that part, it just dropped to $223 and includes a $20 mail-in rebate now.  With a back plate, With 2GB extra, With a copy of MGS5!!!

    Edit: scratch that, PcPartpicker totaled it wrong.  Still $229.98
    If I count in the rebate, the price of GTX 960 can drop as low as $160, making 4GB version you picked even more unfavourable.
  • booniedog96booniedog96 Member UncommonPosts: 289
    edited August 2015
    petedo said:

    If I count in the rebate, the price of GTX 960 can drop as low as $160, making 4GB version you picked even more unfavourable.
    http://pcpartpicker.com/parts/video-card/#c=208&sort=a8&page=1&r=2048


    I've made it easier for you.  Find me a GTX 960 2GB card at $180 before mail-in rebate.

     - Click on the video card and it will take you to a list of online merchants.  It will give you base price and rebate price.

    **Refurbished cards don't count
  • petedopetedo Member CommonPosts: 10
    petedo said:

    If I count in the rebate, the price of GTX 960 can drop as low as $160, making 4GB version you picked even more unfavourable.
    http://pcpartpicker.com/parts/video-card/#c=208&sort=a8&page=1&r=2048


    I've made it easier for you.  Find me a GTX 960 2GB card at $180 before mail-in rebate.

     - Click on the video card and it will take you to a list of online merchants.  It will give you base price and rebate price.

    **Refurbished cards don't count
    OK, my bad.

    It is $190 before rebate and $180 with rebate.
    http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00SD9KZCI/?&tag=pcpapi-20&th=1

    That makes it $40 difference instead of $50, before you brought the rebate thing in. That won't change my point.
  • booniedog96booniedog96 Member UncommonPosts: 289
    edited August 2015
    petedo said:

    OK, my bad.

    It is $190 before rebate and $180 with rebate.
    http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00SD9KZCI/?&tag=pcpapi-20&th=1

    That makes it $40 difference instead of $50, before you brought the rebate thing in. That won't change my point.
    Ok, now convince the OP to change his mind about his choice.  I'm not in the market for a new GPU, I'm just highlighting the choice of the OP.
  • Loke666Loke666 Member EpicPosts: 21,441
    edited August 2015
    petedo said:

    If I count in the rebate, the price of GTX 960 can drop as low as $160, making 4GB version you picked even more unfavourable.
    http://pcpartpicker.com/parts/video-card/#c=208&sort=a8&page=1&r=2048


    I've made it easier for you.  Find me a GTX 960 2GB card at $180 before mail-in rebate.

     - Click on the video card and it will take you to a list of online merchants.  It will give you base price and rebate price.

    **Refurbished cards don't count
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814500371  Newegg have one for $185 which is worth it if you buy the other parts from there as well, otherwise go for it, it is a great price. And yeah, the refurbished cards are from $160 there as well.

    Edit: sorry, the link got messed up.
    Post edited by Loke666 on
  • booniedog96booniedog96 Member UncommonPosts: 289
    Loke666 said:

    http://http//www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814500371  Newegg have one for $185 which is worth it if you buy the other parts from there as well, otherwise go for it, it is a great price. And yeah, the refurbished cards are from $160 there as well.
    link is dead
  • booniedog96booniedog96 Member UncommonPosts: 289
    Loke666 said:

    http://http//www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814500371  Newegg have one for $185 which is worth it if you buy the other parts from there as well, otherwise go for it, it is a great price. And yeah, the refurbished cards are from $160 there as well.
    link is dead
    Ok, now convince the OP to change his mind about his choice.  I'm not in the market for a new GPU, I'm just highlighting the choice of the OP.
  • GdemamiGdemami Member EpicPosts: 12,175
    edited August 2015
    The fact is:

    The OP used a PSU calculator and came up with a decision for his PSU on his own.  He saw what was needed and made an educated decision based on facts.  I didn't tell him what he needed to buy.  His original choice was a really good 650w PSU - my train of thought is if he can afford to put it on his list then I won't say anything to change his mind.  I don't know what he has planned in the future.  What if he wanted to go big on his next rig 5yrs from now?  Having a 650w PSU (still under warranty) to crossover to a new rig could save him money if he was to do that.
    He cannot make an educated decision when you feed him with blunders about CPU bottleneck, dual channel memory, 250W power consumption of GTX 960, ill reasoned/baseless assumptions or whantnot. Those are not facts.

    I could not care less what he picks up but at least he must get correct, relevant information.
  • booniedog96booniedog96 Member UncommonPosts: 289
    edited August 2015
    Gdemami said:
    The fact is:

    The OP used a PSU calculator and came up with a decision for his PSU on his own.  He saw what was needed and made an educated decision based on facts.  I didn't tell him what he needed to buy.  His original choice was a really good 650w PSU - my train of thought is if he can afford to put it on his list then I won't say anything to change his mind.  I don't know what he has planned in the future.  What if he wanted to go big on his next rig 5yrs from now?  Having a 650w PSU (still under warranty) to crossover to a new rig could save him money if he was to do that.
    He cannot make an educated decision when you feed him with blunders about CPU bottleneck, dual channel memory, 250W power consumption of GTX 960 and whatnot. Those are not facts.

    I could not care less what he picks up but at least he must get correct information.
    What?!

    No, I do not know the intricate specs of every single GPU or CPU, that's why I gave him a PSU calculator link.  What have I ever said about dual channel memory?

    I have an idea - you tell the OP what YOU want him to get because obviously you know what he wants.
  • jesteralwaysjesteralways Member RarePosts: 2,560
    Instead of buying SSD and HDD why not buy SEAGATE SSHD? I read several reviews and all of them says these SSHD are quite the bargain for price and also very good for gaming.

    Boobs are LIFE, Boobs are LOVE, Boobs are JUSTICE, Boobs are mankind's HOPES and DREAMS. People who complain about boobs have lost their humanity.

  • booniedog96booniedog96 Member UncommonPosts: 289
    Instead of buying SSD and HDD why not buy SEAGATE SSHD? I read several reviews and all of them says these SSHD are quite the bargain for price and also very good for gaming.
    Like Blade is to vampires "all of their strengths, none of their weaknesses".
  • Loke666Loke666 Member EpicPosts: 21,441
    Instead of buying SSD and HDD why not buy SEAGATE SSHD? I read several reviews and all of them says these SSHD are quite the bargain for price and also very good for gaming.
    Like Blade is to vampires "all of their strengths, none of their weaknesses".
    It would be better to just start with a SSD and get the HD a month or 2 later, OP wont need all the space right away. A separate SSD is better and I don't take hardware advices from Blade.

    And if OP have an old computer he can just plunder the old HD anyways. 
  • booniedog96booniedog96 Member UncommonPosts: 289
    edited August 2015
    Loke666 said:

    It would be better to just start with a SSD and get the HD a month or 2 later, OP wont need all the space right away. A separate SSD is better and I don't take hardware advices from Blade.

    And if OP have an old computer he can just plunder the old HD anyways. 
    Maybe you should make a part list for the OP and tell him why it's better, Bud
Sign In or Register to comment.