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Can I upgrade this?

LootHorderLootHorder Member Posts: 20

Whats Up Guys!

I'm starting to look into getting an actually Gaming PC this month & I had a really big question can I upgrade this PC???

http://www.amazon.com/HP-PAVILION-P2-1334-Desktop-Processor/dp/B00B1XH8Q4

 

Its just a simple computer I'm sure you've guys may or may not of seen or heard of but I really wanted to know if I can salvage Windows 8/& the tower to build a new PC. Mainly cause when I'm building the PC I'm only going to have around $400, in other words budget gaming. But I really feel like I can get something good with $400 if I didnt have to worry about a $70 case & $99 OS. 

 

I understand if I want to keep the OS I may need to stick with this crappy Harddrive. But Maybe its possible to just have the OS on this harddrive & games & such on a 100GB SSD thats on sale? idk lol. I've need tried building my own computer so I dont know. Thanks guys in advance!

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Comments

  • KefoKefo Member EpicPosts: 4,229

    So you want to buy that computer just for the case and OS? Why spend 400 dollars on just the case and OS when you can probably find a better deal somewhere else.

    What parts were you specifically looking at upgrading first and if you don't get this computer is your budget 800 or just the 400?

  • LootHorderLootHorder Member Posts: 20
    Originally posted by Kefo

    So you want to buy that computer just for the case and OS? Why spend 400 dollars on just the case and OS when you can probably find a better deal somewhere else.

    What parts were you specifically looking at upgrading first and if you don't get this computer is your budget 800 or just the 400?

    No No No, This is the computer I already have. I want to upgrade everything in it while keeping the OS & Tower to save money on the actually build. 

  • PemminPemmin Member UncommonPosts: 623

    no

    the case is SUPER small...your gonna have cooling, air flow, and space problems. 

    also you cant really salvage anything other then possibly the ram and the harddrive(which you might as well keep as a slave drive in your new pc)....everything else is either too small or too outdated.

  • VrikaVrika Member EpicPosts: 6,704

    EDIT: On second thought, I'd recommend sticking to that computer until you can spend something like 600$-700$ to buy a decent gaming computer.

    The one you currently have looks like you've bought a new computer max. 2 years ago and tried to get something as cheap as possible. As result you're now immediately needing an upgrade.

    You're again trying to get by purchasing something as cheap as possible. Didn't you learn anything from the first time you did that? EDIT

     
  • PhryPhry Member LegendaryPosts: 11,004
    The last upgrade i did, the only thing i kept was the hard drive, having said that i have an oem version of Win 7/64. But every time to you change the motherboard, you have to reinstall the OS anyway, which means you have to get it authorised again, shouldn't be a problem, but its something you have to bear in mind, one of the reasons i only have the OS installed on the C: drive, with the HD partitioned to reflect this, makes it easier to do clean installs, as i can just reformat the C: partition and install.image
  • jdnewelljdnewell Member UncommonPosts: 2,237

    You may can salvage a few parts off of it, but I would just try to sell the PC whole on craigs list, ebay or whatever.

    You will be better off saving up around $800 and actually building a good PC from the start rather than going cheap again.

  • LootHorderLootHorder Member Posts: 20

    I made the mistake last time of not building my own PC. I don't believe I need as much as $800 ATM to build a nice foundation gaming PC, Considering YouTube & sites like tech Sydicate are blowing up with "Kill Your console PC Builds" that they've shown can play Battlefield 4, crysis 3 at 1080p at 60FPS. I dont need more then that considering I play games on this piece of crap at 15FPS. 

    I'm not looking for the best gaming PC, I just want something better.

     

    And alright. Its a bad idea to keep the case due to it being so small. But I didnt kno that you needed to redownload the OS on a new motherboard lol.. 

  • GdemamiGdemami Member EpicPosts: 12,321


    Originally posted by LootHorder
    Whats Up Guys!I'm starting to look into getting an actually Gaming PC this month & I had a really big question can I upgrade this PC???http://www.amazon.com/HP-PAVILION-P2-1334-Desktop-Processor/dp/B00B1XH8Q4 Its just a simple computer I'm sure you've guys may or may not of seen or heard of but I really wanted to know if I can salvage Windows 8/& the tower to build a new PC. Mainly cause when I'm building the PC I'm only going to have around $400, in other words budget gaming. But I really feel like I can get something good with $400 if I didnt have to worry about a $70 case & $99 OS.  I understand if I want to keep the OS I may need to stick with this crappy Harddrive. But Maybe its possible to just have the OS on this harddrive & games & such on a 100GB SSD thats on sale? idk lol. I've need tried building my own computer so I dont know. Thanks guys in advance!

    The computer is based on ITX platform and motherboard does not allow for slotting dedicated video card that is needed for solid gaming performance as well as it is limiting your possible CPU replacement.

    Power supply will insufficient because ITX computer is designed for very low power consumption so it can fit into that tiny case, which you won't be able to keep either.

    Assuming your OS is OEM licenced, you won't be able to carry it over to new machine since the licence is bound to that motherboard and CPU mostly(you could try to re-active the OS via MS phone line but it is questionable move and unsure of result).


    All in all, what you can safely salvage from the computer is your HDD and optical drive.

    400 USD is very tight budget.

    I would try something like this:

    Intel i3-4160 - 120 USD
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819117447

    Biostar H81 MB - 40 USD
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813138407

    G.SKILL 4 GB - 32 USD
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231644

    EVGA 500W PSU - 40 USD
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817438012

    Powercolor R7 260x - 76 USD
    open box!
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814131613R

    Windows 8.1 OEM - 100 USD
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832416776


    That makes for 408 USD without a case(+26 USD). With 10 USD rebate on PSU, you should be able to put some lower end gaming rig together with just going slightly over your budget,

    If you can increase the budget for 20-70 USD, you could get more reliable motherboard manufacturer(+20 USD), no open box VGA or more powerful card(+30 USD) and probably went with retail version of Windows(it is +20 USD).

    You could also save about 60 USD going with low end CPU
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116950

    and stay easily within budget but the build above is what would make better foundation for a gaming rig and worthy to spent that couple more bucks on.

  • LootHorderLootHorder Member Posts: 20
    Originally posted by Gdemami

     


    Originally posted by LootHorder
    Whats Up Guys!

     

    I'm starting to look into getting an actually Gaming PC this month & I had a really big question can I upgrade this PC???

    http://www.amazon.com/HP-PAVILION-P2-1334-Desktop-Processor/dp/B00B1XH8Q4

     

    Its just a simple computer I'm sure you've guys may or may not of seen or heard of but I really wanted to know if I can salvage Windows 8/& the tower to build a new PC. Mainly cause when I'm building the PC I'm only going to have around $400, in other words budget gaming. But I really feel like I can get something good with $400 if I didnt have to worry about a $70 case & $99 OS. 

     

    I understand if I want to keep the OS I may need to stick with this crappy Harddrive. But Maybe its possible to just have the OS on this harddrive & games & such on a 100GB SSD thats on sale? idk lol. I've need tried building my own computer so I dont know. Thanks guys in advance!


     

    The computer is based on ITX platform and motherboard does not allow for slotting dedicated video card that is needed for solid gaming performance as well as it is limiting your possible CPU replacement.

    Power supply will insufficient because ITX computer is designed for very low power consumption so it can fit into that tiny case, which you won't be able to keep either.

    Assuming your OS is OEM licenced, you won't be able to carry it over to new machine since the licence is bound to that motherboard and CPU mostly(you could try to re-active the OS via MS phone line but it is questionable move and unsure of result).


    All in all, what you can safely salvage from the computer is your HDD and optical drive.

    400 USD is very tight budget.

    I would try something like this:

    Intel i3-4160 - 120 USD
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819117447

    Biostar H81 MB - 40 USD
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813138407

    G.SKILL 4 GB - 32 USD
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231644

    EVGA 500W PSU - 40 USD
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817438012

    Powercolor R7 260x - 76 USD
    open box!
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814131613R

    Windows 8.1 OEM - 100 USD
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832416776


    That makes for 408 USD without a case(+26 USD). With 10 USD rebate on PSU, you should be able to put some lower end gaming rig together with just going slightly over your budget,

    If you can increase the budget for 20-70 USD, you could get more reliable motherboard manufacturer(+20 USD), no open box VGA or more powerful card(+30 USD) and probably went with retail version of Windows(it is +20 USD).

    You could also save about 60 USD going with low end CPU
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116950

    and stay easily within budget but the build above is what would make better foundation for a gaming rig and worthy to spent that couple more bucks on.

    I'm not to worried about a build just yet..

    http://pcpartpicker.com/p/Nj3Jqs

     

    I threw this together with hardly any time, simply on reviews & some research thats far more powerful not to mention $430. even with a new Hard Drive. It doesnt include the OS however, I think I can get away with the OS for $60 which isnt the worst. 

  • KilraneKilrane Member UncommonPosts: 322

    OP, you will be better served long term if you save a bit more and spend at least 600-800 for a decent budget build. That or just break and buy a console if you require immediate gratification. 

     

    Delayed gratification is preferable, IMO. I just don't think you have the willpower based upon your prior purchase, and push for a build based upon a dismally small budget. 

  • PemminPemmin Member UncommonPosts: 623
    Originally posted by LootHorder
    Originally posted by Gdemami

     


    Originally posted by LootHorder
    Whats Up Guys!

     

    I'm starting to look into getting an actually Gaming PC this month & I had a really big question can I upgrade this PC???

    http://www.amazon.com/HP-PAVILION-P2-1334-Desktop-Processor/dp/B00B1XH8Q4

     

    Its just a simple computer I'm sure you've guys may or may not of seen or heard of but I really wanted to know if I can salvage Windows 8/& the tower to build a new PC. Mainly cause when I'm building the PC I'm only going to have around $400, in other words budget gaming. But I really feel like I can get something good with $400 if I didnt have to worry about a $70 case & $99 OS. 

     

    I understand if I want to keep the OS I may need to stick with this crappy Harddrive. But Maybe its possible to just have the OS on this harddrive & games & such on a 100GB SSD thats on sale? idk lol. I've need tried building my own computer so I dont know. Thanks guys in advance!


     

    The computer is based on ITX platform and motherboard does not allow for slotting dedicated video card that is needed for solid gaming performance as well as it is limiting your possible CPU replacement.

    Power supply will insufficient because ITX computer is designed for very low power consumption so it can fit into that tiny case, which you won't be able to keep either.

    Assuming your OS is OEM licenced, you won't be able to carry it over to new machine since the licence is bound to that motherboard and CPU mostly(you could try to re-active the OS via MS phone line but it is questionable move and unsure of result).


    All in all, what you can safely salvage from the computer is your HDD and optical drive.

    400 USD is very tight budget.

    I would try something like this:

    Intel i3-4160 - 120 USD
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819117447

    Biostar H81 MB - 40 USD
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813138407

    G.SKILL 4 GB - 32 USD
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231644

    EVGA 500W PSU - 40 USD
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817438012

    Powercolor R7 260x - 76 USD
    open box!
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814131613R

    Windows 8.1 OEM - 100 USD
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832416776


    That makes for 408 USD without a case(+26 USD). With 10 USD rebate on PSU, you should be able to put some lower end gaming rig together with just going slightly over your budget,

    If you can increase the budget for 20-70 USD, you could get more reliable motherboard manufacturer(+20 USD), no open box VGA or more powerful card(+30 USD) and probably went with retail version of Windows(it is +20 USD).

    You could also save about 60 USD going with low end CPU
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116950

    and stay easily within budget but the build above is what would make better foundation for a gaming rig and worthy to spent that couple more bucks on.

    I'm not to worried about a build just yet..

    http://pcpartpicker.com/p/Nj3Jqs

     

    I threw this together with hardly any time, simply on reviews & some research thats far more powerful not to mention $430. even with a new Hard Drive. It doesnt include the OS however, I think I can get away with the OS for $60 which isnt the worst. 

    you should spend the 15 extra dollars upgrading the Asus Radeon R9 270 2GB DirectCU II to a Asus Radeon R9 280 3GB DirectCU II

    more importantly your missing a cooling system (cpu cooler and case fans)

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,679

    I think that getting a new $400 computer to replace the old would be a reasonable thing to do.  Whether an upgrade makes sense depends on what you're upgrading from.  And look what he's upgrading from:  an AMD E1-1200.  That chip is AMD's idea of a netbook.  From 2011.  And a lower clocked version of it, at that.  It sports two CPU cores clocked at 1.4 GHz, together with two low clocked SIMD engines from AMD's Radeon HD 5000/6000 series.  That's fine for e-mail and word processing, but it's marginal even for web browsing, let alone games.  Many games will be unplayable even at minimum settings.

    Unfortunately, the problem with getting the cheapest piece of junk that you can find is that basically nothing from it has any value.  The optical drive from it will be fine, assuming it works.  The hard drive would probably be fine, except that it's getting close to the age when it should be replaced on general principle.  No other hardware in the entire computer would have any use in proper gaming rig, unless you want to be pedantic and count stuff like screws and SATA cables.  And a new motherboard means a new OS license, too.

    Some people have posted, here's $400 worth of parts that you could buy.  But just not enough parts to be a complete computer.  Some parts will need to be scaled down in order to fit the budget.  For example, you could get this:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.2159031

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813132135

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820721107

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817438012

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811147196

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827106393

    That comes to $367, including shipping and before $20 in rebates.  There's no OS, but you could use the Windows 10 preview for a while, though you'll have to buy it eventually.  It only has 120 GB of storage, but you can add a hard drive later.  And it uses integrated graphics, but you can add a discrete video card later.  That would get you a functional gaming rig now, with viable options to upgrade it to something nicer later without having to toss out stuff that you paid for now.

    And look what it gets you:

    -four CPU cores instead of two, with each core 3-4 times as fast as what you have now.

    -integrated graphics, yes, but with about 5 or 6 times the GPU performance of what you have now.

    -a real SSD now so that, while you can't have that many games installed at once, what you do have will be fast.

    -an upgrade path so that if you're willing to spend another $200-$300 later, you can end up with something not terribly different from what you'd have gotten if you had that extra money to spend now.  In particular, no need to throw out today's parts to replace them with upgrades.

    -leave the old computer intact and functional, so you might be able to sell it for something to someone who has very basic computer needs and just needs something that works.

    Using the Windows 10 preview is a major catch, however.  It does let you delay paying for Windows by several months, but it doesn't let you get out of it entirely.

  • GdemamiGdemami Member EpicPosts: 12,321


    Originally posted by LootHorderI'm not to worried about a build just yet..http://pcpartpicker.com/p/Nj3Jqs I threw this together with hardly any time, simply on reviews & some research thats far more powerful not to mention $430. even with a new Hard Drive. It doesnt include the OS however, I think I can get away with the OS for $60 which isnt the worst. 

    That CPU is way slower than i3, case will likely be too small to fit that VGA and won't provide enough air flow, especially for that AMD combo. I would be a bit worried about that PSU too if you ever wanted to use hungrier VGA.

    You want DDR1600 memory, not DDR1333.


    The true price tag on that build is 487 USD, there are just lots of rebates... Overall, not really a good built, imo.


    Good tip from Quizz on that Win 10 preview, that could save you some money and get better VGA.


  • LootHorderLootHorder Member Posts: 20
    Originally posted by Quizzical

    I think that getting a new $400 computer to replace the old would be a reasonable thing to do.  Whether an upgrade makes sense depends on what you're upgrading from.  And look what he's upgrading from:  an AMD E1-1200.  That chip is AMD's idea of a netbook.  From 2011.  And a lower clocked version of it, at that.  It sports two CPU cores clocked at 1.4 GHz, together with two low clocked SIMD engines from AMD's Radeon HD 5000/6000 series.  That's fine for e-mail and word processing, but it's marginal even for web browsing, let alone games.  Many games will be unplayable even at minimum settings.

    Unfortunately, the problem with getting the cheapest piece of junk that you can find is that basically nothing from it has any value.  The optical drive from it will be fine, assuming it works.  The hard drive would probably be fine, except that it's getting close to the age when it should be replaced on general principle.  No other hardware in the entire computer would have any use in proper gaming rig, unless you want to be pedantic and count stuff like screws and SATA cables.  And a new motherboard means a new OS license, too.

    Some people have posted, here's $400 worth of parts that you could buy.  But just not enough parts to be a complete computer.  Some parts will need to be scaled down in order to fit the budget.  For example, you could get this:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.2159031

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813132135

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820721107

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817438012

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811147196

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827106393

    That comes to $367, including shipping and before $20 in rebates.  There's no OS, but you could use the Windows 10 preview for a while, though you'll have to buy it eventually.  It only has 120 GB of storage, but you can add a hard drive later.  And it uses integrated graphics, but you can add a discrete video card later.  That would get you a functional gaming rig now, with viable options to upgrade it to something nicer later without having to toss out stuff that you paid for now.

    And look what it gets you:

    -four CPU cores instead of two, with each core 3-4 times as fast as what you have now.

    -integrated graphics, yes, but with about 5 or 6 times the GPU performance of what you have now.

    -a real SSD now so that, while you can't have that many games installed at once, what you do have will be fast.

    -an upgrade path so that if you're willing to spend another $200-$300 later, you can end up with something not terribly different from what you'd have gotten if you had that extra money to spend now.  In particular, no need to throw out today's parts to replace them with upgrades.

    -leave the old computer intact and functional, so you might be able to sell it for something to someone who has very basic computer needs and just needs something that works.

    Using the Windows 10 preview is a major catch, however.  It does let you delay paying for Windows by several months, but it doesn't let you get out of it entirely.

    @Quizzical I actually like that. However, Would you still advise this if I could make the budget somewhere near $550???

  • Electro057Electro057 Member UncommonPosts: 683
    As soon as you change the month rboar you'll lose your OS license, and you'll need to change the mobo.

    --Custom Rig: Pyraxis---
    NZXT Phantom 410 Case
    Intel Core i5-4690 Processor - Quad Core, 6MB Smart Cache, 3.5GHz
    Asus Sabertooth Z87 Motherboard
    Asus GeForce GTX 760 Video Card - 2GB GDDR5, PCI-Express 3.0
    Kingston HyperX Fury Blue 16GB

  • Loke666Loke666 Member EpicPosts: 21,441
    Originally posted by LootHorder

    I made the mistake last time of not building my own PC. I don't believe I need as much as $800 ATM to build a nice foundation gaming PC, Considering YouTube & sites like tech Sydicate are blowing up with "Kill Your console PC Builds" that they've shown can play Battlefield 4, crysis 3 at 1080p at 60FPS. I dont need more then that considering I play games on this piece of crap at 15FPS. 

    I'm not looking for the best gaming PC, I just want something better.

    And alright. Its a bad idea to keep the case due to it being so small. But I didnt kno that you needed to redownload the OS on a new motherboard lol.. 

    Well, legally you have to or you break the license agreement. Practically you can still do it (but I of course can't recommend it, particularly on a public site).

    You will need at least $600 for the hardware, not counting the screen, input devices and OS. I would put in a bit more though to get an acceptable graphics card but you could start with a cheap one and upgrade that as soon as you get money for it.

    You could probably strip the PSU but I can't find the stats on it so it depends if it is crap or not. The memory is way too old and crappy to use but you could use the harddrive as well.

    As for the case you could probably use it as long as you get a micro ATX card but I wouldn't recommend that either, the more air you have inside a box the better.

    Nah, I would try to sell it. Amazon actually takes $400 for a pre-owned one so you should get at least $200 for it which still is a big help.

    I would also get Windows 7 instead of 8.1 but that is my own preference and if you are used to 8 go for it.

    It is just not worth upgrading junk, a new GFX card, a SSD and more ram wouldn't changed that it is old and not that good even when it was new. 

    With a limited budget I would focus on the basics, a good PSU, a nice motherboard and a CPU. 8 gigs ram as well. Then I would upgrade the GFX card and get an SSD later instead of trying to get everything right on a low budget.

    But that is me, Quizz probably got some good suggestions, I am not that great on low budget riggs.

  • GdemamiGdemami Member EpicPosts: 12,321

    Here is build from pricepicker if you prefer:

    http://pcpartpicker.com/p/XPH423

    A beast for 402 USD if you go with Windows 10 preview.


    Quizzical advise you no dedicated VGA, pointlessly small SSD and poor CPU for gaming - wasted money.

  • LootHorderLootHorder Member Posts: 20

    I had no idea this would turn out to be difficult even just coming up with the best price 2 performance ratio lol.. 

    I do have to say I'm thinking about going with Lunix Zorin. Its been getting nothing but greate reviews since windows 7 cam eout & with its Windows skin I wud have no problem finding my way around. 

    Also I understand under $400 may have been 2 low. And it is possible for me to put up to $500 $550 being the max. 

  • GdemamiGdemami Member EpicPosts: 12,321


    Originally posted by LootHorder
    I do have to say I'm thinking about going with Lunix Zorin. Its been getting nothing but greate reviews since windows 7 cam eout & with its Windows skin I wud have no problem finding my way around.

    No point going Linux for gaming as your game selection will be very limited to what is available on wine or similar.

    Also...Mint distro ^^

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,679
    Originally posted by LootHorder

    I had no idea this would turn out to be difficult even just coming up with the best price 2 performance ratio lol.. 

    I do have to say I'm thinking about going with Lunix Zorin. Its been getting nothing but greate reviews since windows 7 cam eout & with its Windows skin I wud have no problem finding my way around. 

    Also I understand under $400 may have been 2 low. And it is possible for me to put up to $500 $550 being the max. 

    In that case, we should back up and ask what you're planning on doing with the computer.  Most games use DirectX, which is proprietary to Microsoft, so it will not run at all on Linux.  You can try to work around that with Wine or some other such things, but that's very hit and miss, and some games still won't work for you.  Linux is a perfectly good OS for a lot of things, but playing DirectX games isn't one of them.

    On a larger budget, the first thing I'd fix is to get a real copy of Windows and not just the preview edition of Windows 10.  Getting the preview version is kind of a hack, and only delays having to pay for Windows.  You really don't want to be in a situation where Windows won't work until you pay $100 and you don't have $100 available to pay.

    But after that, you've got some choices to make, and to some degree, where you want to put the money is a philosophical question that doesn't have a clear right answer.

    If it were for my personal use, the first thing I'd do is to grab a larger SSD, to make sure I had plenty of capacity and didn't need to upgrade it later:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820226576

    You don't necessarily have to spend all of the money, but you could also fit a higher clocked version of the same CPU, which will have some overclocking headroom if you decide to buy a discrete video card later:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.2160487

    But I'm not averse to turning down graphical settings.  I turn off some settings because I think they look stupid, even if the game runs fine for me on high settings.  But some people won't even play a game if they can't run it at max or at least high settings.  If you care a lot about graphical settings, then the way to go is making room for a discrete video card.  A cheaper CPU and cheaper memory frees up some budget space:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819113348

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820226217

    Cheaper memory because memory bandwidth only matters much if you're using integrated graphics, at least so long as you don't do something stupid like leave a memory channel vacant entirely.  And then that frees up room for a discrete video card:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814161461

    You can expect that to give you about triple the graphical performance of the integrated graphics I linked earlier.

     

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,679
    Originally posted by Gdemami

    Here is build from pricepicker if you prefer:

    http://pcpartpicker.com/p/XPH423

    A beast for 402 USD if you go with Windows 10 preview.


    Quizzical advise you no dedicated VGA, pointlessly small SSD and poor CPU for gaming - wasted money.

    You've got no storage whatsoever, whether an SSD or otherwise.  You're not just missing an OS; you have no way to install it even if you had one.  And you're leaving a memory channel vacant entirely.  I know you love your dual core processors, but really, get a quad core these days.

  • GdemamiGdemami Member EpicPosts: 12,321


    Originally posted by QuizzicalYou've got no storage whatsoever, whether an SSD or otherwise.  You're not just missing an OS; you have no way to install it even if you had one.  And you're leaving a memory channel vacant entirely.  I know you love your dual core processors, but really, get a quad core these days.

    HDD and optical drive are salvagable and very usable parts from old computer.

    You can install the OS from USB drive anyway....


    Yes, 1 bank is left empty for further upgrade. Dual channel has no relevant impact on performance, we went throught this already....

    More cores does not mean faster CPU.

    Not that CPU discussion again...educate yourself on difference between multithreading and parallel processing first please, you are more than 10 years behind.

    Once again your obsession with SSD and AMD make ppl waste money...


  • syntax42syntax42 Member UncommonPosts: 1,378
    Originally posted by Gdemami

     


    Originally posted by Quizzical

     

    You've got no storage whatsoever, whether an SSD or otherwise.  You're not just missing an OS; you have no way to install it even if you had one.  And you're leaving a memory channel vacant entirely.  I know you love your dual core processors, but really, get a quad core these days.


     

    HDD and optical drive are salvagable and very usable parts from old computer.

    You can install the OS from USB drive anyway....


    Yes, 1 bank is left empty for further upgrade. Dual channel has no relevant impact on performance, we went throught this already....

    More cores does not mean faster CPU.

    Not that CPU discussion again...educate yourself on difference between multithreading and parallel processing first please, you are more than 10 years behind.

    Once again your obsession with SSD and AMD make ppl waste money...

    Yes, the optical drive can be salvaged.  Salvaging the hard drive and using it as a primary drive is a bad idea and will lead to problems.  Mechanical drives have a life-span of about five years, depending on use.  The system the drive was in was very small and probably caused the drive to get very warm, further reducing the life of the drive.  I wouldn't trust it to last more than one more year.  You don't want that kind of risk on a new system.

    Memory bandwidth is important for integrated GPUs and tasks outside of gaming.  There is no good reason to use one DIMM when you have four slots and can get two DIMMs of half the capacity for the same price as one DIMM.

    It seems you need some education on hyperthreading, which is different from multithreading and parallel processing.  Having two physical cores try to perform the load of four cores isn't the same as having four real cores.  A core i3 is a decent CPU for the budget, but games are starting to take better advantage of four physical cores now.

    A SSD alleviates a major bottleneck in computers.  The difference between loading for 2 minutes every 15 minutes and spending only 15 seconds of loading can save you eight days per yearof not staring at loading screens if you play just 4 hours per day.  

    The 120 GB storage size chosen by Quizzical is enough to install the OS and a handful of games.  A SSD is not a bulk storage device and should not be used to hoard downloaded files, movies, or music.  Get a hard drive or use the one in the old system to store downloads and media.  If the hard drive fails, you don't lose your OS.

     

     

    Also, "people" waste money.  I have no idea what a "ppl" is doing or how it is wasting money.  Educate yourself on spelling and grammar, and when to use the various written communication styles.  Here's a hint:  using text-message shorthand outside of texting makes you seem unintelligent or lazy because it only takes three more buttons to type "people".

  • KiyorisKiyoris Member RarePosts: 2,130
    Originally posted by syntax42

    A SSD alleviates a major bottleneck in computers.  The difference between loading for 2 minutes every 15 minutes and spending only 15 seconds of loading can save you eight days per yearof not staring at loading screens if you play just 4 hours per day. 

     

    In what universe does that happen.

    A regular Western Digital black does 170MB/s. A good SSD does 500MB/s.

    That's 3 times as fast. Your 2 minutes to 15 seconds is 8 times as fast.

     

    SSD are about 3 times as fast in sequential reading as HHD, not 8 times.

  • KiyorisKiyoris Member RarePosts: 2,130
    Originally posted by syntax42

     Educate yourself on spelling and grammar, and when to use the various written communication styles.

    educate yourself in math too

    I agree with Gdemami, ppl far too easily recommend SSD. For ppl on a budget, nothing beats an HDD in price, in capacity and in reliability.

    Many people would be far happier with a HDD with 2TB than having to cram everything in a small SSD. If they can't afford both, they're better off with a reliable HDD.

    Shaving off a few second during loading wouldn't weigh against not having enough storage.

     

    Also, SSD slow down once they get filled up, it's NOT a good idea to cram a small SSD full with stuff. It is far better for people on a budget, to get a large HDD and be comfortable in your ability to use what you have bought without having to worry all the time not to fill up your tiny SSD.

    I also wouldn't advise anyone to store sensitive data on an SSD. HDD are still king when it comes to reliability.

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