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Complete system on a budget

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  • PerramasPerramas Member UncommonPosts: 83
    Im going with the ASUS mobo, I picked the R9 280 because I got it for $156 hard to beat that price for the performance.

    FUncom putting the FU in fun since 1993.

  • GdemamiGdemami Member EpicPosts: 12,182


    Originally posted by stevebombsquad

    I think you might want to delete that last sentence after looking at the advice you have given or the fact that you are not fully comprehending the concept of what speeds are "natively" supported. I am just saying.....

    Only what isn't supported is SPD - serial presence detection. That means that once you slot in the memory, it won't be recognized and memory settings will need to be done manually.

    That is all. There is no overclocking as all system parameters will run at native speeds - FSB, memory clock, CPU speed, voltages, you name it.

  • GdemamiGdemami Member EpicPosts: 12,182

     


    Originally posted by jdnewell

    If you stuck 1600 speed RAM in that board and did nothing else it would not run at the rated 1600. Manually changing voltage or other settings is overclocking.

     

    As the name implies, overclocking is settings the clock over the inteded rate. Which isn't happening here.

    Manual settings = / = overlcocking, it just means you set the parametrs yourself instead of "auto".

    [mod edit]

  • DarLorkarDarLorkar Member UncommonPosts: 1,082
    Originally posted by Gdemami

     


    Originally posted by stevebombsquad

    I think you might want to delete that last sentence after looking at the advice you have given or the fact that you are not fully comprehending the concept of what speeds are "natively" supported. I am just saying.....

     

    Only what isn't supported is SPD - serial presence detection. That means that once you slot in the memory, it won't be recognized and memory settings will need to be done manually.

    That is all. There is no overclocking as all system parameters will run at native speeds - FSB, memory clock, CPU speed, voltages, you name it.

    If you plug something in and it is not recognized.....kind of the definition of not native isn't it?  But moot anyhow, OP has picked the part they need.

     

     

  • jdnewelljdnewell Member UncommonPosts: 2,237
    Originally posted by Gdemami

     


    Originally posted by jdnewell

    If you stuck 1600 speed RAM in that board and did nothing else it would not run at the rated 1600. Manually changing voltage or other settings is overclocking.

     

    As the name implies, overclocking is settings the clock over the inteded rate. Which isn't happening here.

    Manual settings = / = overlcocking, it just means you set the parametrs yourself instead of "auto".


    [mod edit]

    [mod edit] Everyone but you thinks this is a bad idea and for good reason.

    But I do have a question. If that is the case and going in to change settings is not considered OC then why does it show 1333+ (O.C.) on the product specification page? In exactly that way, exactly. Why?

    I will tell you. Because you are changing settings from the default. Which may or may not work, or work correctly. Thats why 1066 is listed without the ~(O.C.)~beside it.

    But by all means keep building I3 machines with bottom of the barrel motherboards if it makes you feel better.

  • stevebombsquadstevebombsquad Member UncommonPosts: 884
    Originally posted by Gdemami

     


    Originally posted by jdnewell

    If you stuck 1600 speed RAM in that board and did nothing else it would not run at the rated 1600. Manually changing voltage or other settings is overclocking.

     

    As the name implies, overclocking is settings the clock over the inteded rate. Which isn't happening here.

    Manual settings = / = overlcocking, it just means you set the parametrs yourself instead of "auto".


    You shouldn't really be posting on these board section, your ignorance is going inevitably provide ill advice.

    You must be trolling? If not, you should really do a little more research before calling people names. I am not trying to demean you, but you seem confused or possibly you are not understanding what people are trying to explain to you.

    James T. Kirk: All she's got isn't good enough! What else ya got?

  • GdemamiGdemami Member EpicPosts: 12,182


    Originally posted by jdnewell

    But I do have a question. If that is the case and going in to change settings is not considered OC then why does it show 1333+ (O.C.) on the product specification page? In exactly that way, exactly. Why?

    Because you can buy the board and 1066 MHz memory and it will work without needing to know about manual settings. It is easier to understandand for non-tech savvy people, less confusing.

    Just look at your own comments...

    i3
    Like other poster said, i3 is performance wise on par with FX-6300. Price is about the same.

    Imo, i3 is still a bit better CPU and if I had to upgrade used part later on, I would prefer used i3 rather than any AMD 8xxx CPU.

    Also in general I am reluctant to spent much on CPU in gaming rigs - other awful myth and ill advice common on these boards.

    Check out this video:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66BiQsOM9_M

    MB...
    Unless you truly need those extra ports, memory banks,crossfire or some other very specific feature, it is wasted money.

  • Loke666Loke666 Member EpicPosts: 21,441
    Originally posted by Gdemami

     


    Originally posted by jdnewell

    But I do have a question. If that is the case and going in to change settings is not considered OC then why does it show 1333+ (O.C.) on the product specification page? In exactly that way, exactly. Why?

     

    Because you can buy the board and 1066 MHz memory and it will work without needing to know about manual settings. It is easier to understandand for non-tech savvy people, less confusing.

    Just look at your own comments...

    i3
    Like other poster said, i3 is performance wise on par with FX-6300. Price is about the same.

    Imo, i3 is still a bit better CPU and if I had to upgrade used part later on, I would prefer used i3 rather than any AMD 8xxx CPU.

    Also in general I am reluctant to spent much on CPU in gaming rigs - other awful myth and ill advice common on these boards.

    Check out this video:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66BiQsOM9_M

    MB...
    Unless you truly need those extra ports, memory banks,crossfire or some other very specific feature, it is wasted money.

    Clocking up the memory is a rather standard way to OC together with clocking the CPU and GPUs memory, but for it to be counted as OC it means you clock it beyond the standard for the chipset. Still you are just marking words here.

    Also, clocking the memory is not something you should do if you don't know exactly what you are doing. Depending on your case and cooling you can do far more damage than it is worth. The worst thing is of course to clock the memory on the GFX card since many GFX cards don't have a good fan for the memory and I replaced a few cards from friends who thought they were competent for that reason.

    The general rule of all overclocking is that you either know your hardware well and know what you are doing or you shouldn't do it at all. I seen many people kill their computer because someone told them that they should OC to get more out of their computer. And OC someone else computer is really something I would think carefully about.

    But you are correct that the CPU isn't that important in most games, there are a few CPU heavy still but a good GFX card and a crap CPU beats the other way around in at least 95% of all games. It however depend on what you do with your computer and that is something you should consider carefully when you do a build. Memory size, CPU and GFX card should be picked especially for what you plan to use your computer for when you are on a tight budget.

    There are other factors besides them to take in at times, built a computer for a friend a while back that worked with music so in his case I got an SSD together with 4 raided drives in raid 5 to lower the chance of him losing precious files to a harddrive failure while at the same time giving him pretty good speed for all drives and not just the SSD. And yes, we also got a backup USB drive for critical files, you just can't be too safe in cases like that.

    I myself would have gone for Quizz build with the SSD if I were to build it with the information we got from OP.

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,129
    Originally posted by Gdemami

     


    Originally posted by Quizzical
    If you get that motherboard, you're taking an AMD chipset and an AMD processor that AMD never meant to be compatible with each other and relying on Gigabyte to make them work together--and without the ability to modify either the CPU or the chipset.  Will it work well enough that someone who is clueless about computers won't think it's obviously broken?  Probably.  Will you get the full, proper PCI Express, USB, SATA, and system memory bandwidth, as well as the normal CPU clock speeds and voltages with turbo, idle clock down, and all of the other features you'd hope for?  Doubtful.  I'm pretty sure that it won't give the normal SATA and system memory bandwidths; I'm not sure about some other things.

     

    Yes, you can plug in 1600 MHz DDR3 modules, run them at 1066 MHz, and they'll work.  But that's very different from buying 1600 MHz modules and running them at 1600 MHz, which isn't supported and may or may not even be available as an overclocking option.


     

    The board will run DDR3 1600 at DDR3 1600 speed.

    It is not difficult to use google to find out people use the same setup and are even capable to OC with that combo, ability that is on these boards funilly being contributed to expensive boards only, making people waste their money.


    http://www.overclockers.com/forums/showthread.php/749817-Piledriver-FX-6300-on-Gigabyte-GA-78LMT-USB3

    Well yes, do look at that thread.  He's trying to overclock stuff as far as it can go.  With the CPU at 4.4 GHz and the memory at 1600 MHz, he's having problems with it.  Meanwhile, he's overclocked exactly the same memory to 2 GHz on a different motherboard.  And a different bin of that same CPU will do 5 GHz at stock settings.

    I don't normally recommend spending a ton of money on a motherboard.  But I usually do recommend avoiding the lowest end, cheap junk motherboards--and that's what we're arguing about here.

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