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What MB/PS/CPU should i get for this card

angerbeaverangerbeaver Member UncommonPosts: 1,101

I am upgrading my card to this

http://www.ncix.com/detail/gigabyte-geforce-gtx-780-ti-88-93732-1246.htm

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 780 Ti OC 1020MHZ 3GB 7.0Ghz GDDR5 2xDVI HDMI Display Port PCI-E Video Card

 

Do any of these require upgrades to run this smoothly?

I am currently using

CPU -> Intel Core i7-950 Bloomfield Quad-Core 3.06GHz LGA 1366 130W Processor BX80601950

MB -> GIGABYTE GA-X58A-UD3R LGA 1366 Intel X58 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

PS -> http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139009 (CORSAIR Enthusiast Series CMPSU-850TX 850W ATX12V v2.2 / EPS12V v2.91 SLI CrossFire 80 PLUS Certified Active PFC Power Supply)

 

If so please let me why and what suggestions you have as I'm not very good at the technical stuff =)

Comments

  • VrikaVrika Member EpicPosts: 6,420

    Your CPU, MB and PSU are good enough. The processor could maybe have a bit better single-thread performance to keep up with that graphic card in all situations, but it's good enough that upgrading isn't necessary and would be a waste of money.

    If you want to upgrade something, do you already have SSD hard drive?

     
  • angerbeaverangerbeaver Member UncommonPosts: 1,101

    Funny you mention the drive -> http://www.ncix.com/detail/adata-sx900-2-5-256gb-ssd-0a-70080-1246.htm

    This was also on the list because it is on sale :)

  • BakgrindBakgrind Member UncommonPosts: 418
    The only thing I would suggest that you find out prior to purchasing the card is if your power supply unit has all the molex plugs that it needs to to connect the video card up to. I just installed a  Radeon R9 into my nephews pc and was caught by suprise that his PSU only had a 1 6 pin plug coming out of it when in fact i needed to have 2 6 pin plugs to install the card with.,
  • angerbeaverangerbeaver Member UncommonPosts: 1,101

    Hm, 

    I don't remember plugging my current card into the PSU directly but it was 4 years ago.

    I took a look and the PSU says 4 x 6+2-Pin whereas the card actually says Power requirement: 600W (with two 8-pin external power connectors)

    I would not have thought to check this, so thanks!!

  • jdnewelljdnewell Member UncommonPosts: 2,237

    Your current PSU is fine. The 4 x 6+2 pin connectors are what you need. Actually just two of them for a single GPU. The 6 +2 pins mean they can be used as an 8 pin or a 6 pin connector. In the case of needing 2 x 8pin connectors you would use two of the 6+2 pin and just use the extra 2 pin connectors that are connected to the 6 pin.

    Here is a link where the image shows what it will look like, the bottom right corner of the image is what you will plug into the GPU.

    http://www.precisionmicro.net/index.php?mod=product&sub=product&CategoryID=4&SubCategoryID=20&ProductID=258

     

    I will second throwing in an SSD. The rest of the system is fine and I would not upgrade your CPU, MB, or PSU unless you are just unhappy with the performance.

    Add the new GPU and put your OS on the SSD you buy and I bet you will be pleased.

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,090

    Don't get that SSD.  Get one of these two instead:

    http://www.ncix.com/detail/kingston-ssdnow-v300-240gb-2-5in-df-80209-1246.htm

    http://www.ncix.com/detail/crucial-mx100-256gb-sata-6gbps-a6-97624-1246.htm

    The first is basically the same as what you picked.  The second is different, but also good.  And both are from more reputable vendors; some of A-data's SSDs have had problems.  And they're also both cheaper.

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,090
    Originally posted by Bakgrind
    The only thing I would suggest that you find out prior to purchasing the card is if your power supply unit has all the molex plugs that it needs to to connect the video card up to. I just installed a  Radeon R9 into my nephews pc and was caught by suprise that his PSU only had a 1 6 pin plug coming out of it when in fact i needed to have 2 6 pin plugs to install the card with.,

    A power supply uses PCI-E power connectors, not Molex.  Molex is usually for case fans.

    Power supplies typically come with 6+2-pin PCI-E power connectors.  These can function either as 6-pin connectors or as 8-pin, depending on whether the 2 pins are positioned next to the 6 to plug in with them or dangling off to the side to not plug in.

    Buying adapters for a power supply is usually a bad idea, as if the power supply doesn't have enough power connectors for your hardware, it probably means that it can't safely deliver enough power.

  • VrikaVrika Member EpicPosts: 6,420
    Originally posted by Quizzical

    Buying adapters for a power supply is usually a bad idea, as if the power supply doesn't have enough power connectors for your hardware, it probably means that it can't safely deliver enough power.

    I disagree. Adapters can be really good thing if you've got old power supply that has ridiculous number of 4-pin molex connectors but too few PCI-E or SATA power connectors.

     
  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 22,090
    Originally posted by Vrika
    Originally posted by Quizzical

    Buying adapters for a power supply is usually a bad idea, as if the power supply doesn't have enough power connectors for your hardware, it probably means that it can't safely deliver enough power.

    I disagree. Adapters can be really good thing if you've got old power supply that has ridiculous number of 4-pin molex connectors but too few PCI-E or SATA power connectors.

    If you've got an ancient power supply that is a relic of an era when providing a lot of power on the +12 V rail wasn't necessary, why would you want to hook up a high-powered video card to it rather than replacing it?  Trying to keep using an old power supply until it fries things is a bad idea.

  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,059

    Aren't you going about this process a bit backwards here?

    Ok, you got a nice deal on a 780Ti.

    But typically you don't build a computer around a video card (unless your explicitly planning on doing a huge multi-card monster rig). You build a computer, and one part of that is the video card.

    The short answer:
    Your 780Ti will work fine with what you have now.

    The "duh no crap" answer:
    Your computer will run faster if you build a faster computer.

    So I guess take your pick of those two answers, and then go from there.

  • PhryPhry Member LegendaryPosts: 11,004
    Originally posted by Quizzical
    Originally posted by Vrika
    Originally posted by Quizzical

    Buying adapters for a power supply is usually a bad idea, as if the power supply doesn't have enough power connectors for your hardware, it probably means that it can't safely deliver enough power.

    I disagree. Adapters can be really good thing if you've got old power supply that has ridiculous number of 4-pin molex connectors but too few PCI-E or SATA power connectors.

    If you've got an ancient power supply that is a relic of an era when providing a lot of power on the +12 V rail wasn't necessary, why would you want to hook up a high-powered video card to it rather than replacing it?  Trying to keep using an old power supply until it fries things is a bad idea.

    Keeping the power supply might be inviting problems longer term anyway, eventually its going to let go, either because its not operating within designed tolerances, or just through simple wear and tear, and when it does, your liable to lose a few other components too, most likely the mobo although you'd be lucky if thats all it did. Power supplies are not that expensive that you should risk the rest of your system by not replacing it. image

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