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upgrading video card, I would like some advice.

forcelimaforcelima Member UncommonPosts: 232

Hello all, Well its time for me to upgrade my video card and I am not sure what to get my price range is $400 USD. I am replacing an aging ATI Radeon HD 5850, my PSU is a Corsair tx650 v2, the new Video card has to be able to fit in a Corsair Carbide series r400 case, motherboard is a asus p8h77-v, if you need any more info just let me know.

Thank you in advance,

Comments

  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,375

    *edit*

    Sorry, double post - stupid forum decided to hiccup.

  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,375

    GeForce 770 is probably the best bet at $400 right now - although the AMD 7970 GHz edition isn't a bad card either at that price if you want to stick with AMD.

    The 7970 is around 10.8" long, the 770 is around 11.2"

    Either should fit decently in a mid-tower case (although you may lose a hard drive bay). Either card would be right around 1" longer than your 5850 - to give you an idea of how it may fit.

    Either card should work fine inside of a 650W Corsair PSU as well.

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 24,846

    At $400, a GeForce GTX 770 is the clear winner:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125463

    But you might want to consider that you can save a lot of money while adding video memory by giving up maybe 10% of the performance of that and getting a Radeon HD 7970:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814202008

    The AMD "gold reward" means they have a list of 9 games, and you get your choice of any 3 of them free with the card.

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 24,846
    Also, neither your power supply nor your case is a meaningful limitation on single-GPU system upgrades unless you want to do something really outlandish.  (e.g., liquid nitrogen overclocking)
  • IncomparableIncomparable Member UncommonPosts: 1,126
    Originally posted by Quizzical
    Also, neither your power supply nor your case is a meaningful limitation on single-GPU system upgrades unless you want to do something really outlandish.  (e.g., liquid nitrogen overclocking)

    So what you are saying is that cpu's are a bottle neck. Even the new cpus are bottle necks to new video cards. I know that cpus are designed with over clocking in mind. Especially the low voltage and low heat cpus.

    Yet expecting the consumer to over lock instead of the company offering a special gamer edition with a special heat sink/cooling device is better than expecting people to google and with trial and error get the voltage right for over clocking. Its not easy, and google might not offer the best links for specific cpus as well.

    So i agree if that was your point.

    “Write bad things that are done to you in sand, but write the good things that happen to you on a piece of marble”

  • jdnewelljdnewell Member UncommonPosts: 2,237
    Originally posted by Incomparable
    Originally posted by Quizzical
    Also, neither your power supply nor your case is a meaningful limitation on single-GPU system upgrades unless you want to do something really outlandish.  (e.g., liquid nitrogen overclocking)

    So what you are saying is that cpu's are a bottle neck. Even the new cpus are bottle necks to new video cards. I know that cpus are designed with over clocking in mind. Especially the low voltage and low heat cpus.

    Yet expecting the consumer to over lock instead of the company offering a special gamer edition with a special heat sink/cooling device is better than expecting people to google and with trial and error get the voltage right for over clocking. Its not easy, and google might not offer the best links for specific cpus as well.

    So i agree if that was your point.

    How did you get all of that off what Quiz posted?

    He was basically saying his PSU and Case will be fine for a single gpu setup. How you got anything about a cpu bottleneck out of that post is beyond me.

    The part about liquid nitrogen OCing  I think meant he would need a better PSU if he was going to do the extreme OCing that would probably accompany such a setup.

     

    And the actual quote in your sig is " Write your sorrows in the sand but carve your blessings in stone"

  • grndzrogrndzro Member UncommonPosts: 1,162

    Radeon 9000 series is just around the corner. With next gen being centered around AMD I would wait a few months and grab one.

    AMD have all next gen consoles so going AMD should be a no brainer.

  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,375


    Originally posted by grndzro
    Radeon 9000 series is just around the corner. With next gen being centered around AMD I would wait a few months and grab one.AMD have all next gen consoles so going AMD should be a no brainer.

    No leaked benchmarks, no pictures of engineering samples, no Chinese-translated web sites.

    Just around the corner is still a ways off. AMD isn't changing the process node, and is only doing some minor updates to GCN2.0.

    I would bet the cards will be about 10-15% faster than what we see now, but still won't challenge Titan. The best case scenario is that it forces down nVidia's pricing and provides some direct competition against the 770/780, and we see a lot more performance for the dollar in the $150-350 price range (where most people are buying anyway).

    The 9000 series will be nice (the 8k series is supposed to be OEM only for some god forsaken reason), but it won't be earthshaking and I don't know that it would necessarily be worth waiting for. Particularly when all the signs point to a late fall release at best.

    As far as AMD having all the next-gen consoles - that part is true. But I don't think that will have a meaningful impact on PC GPU performance. The drivers for those GPUs are baked into the Consoles, and will have little to do with Windows/Linux/OSX drivers, and they aren't terribly powerful GPUs in the first place.

    The best thing the next-gen consoles will do for PC gaming is hopefully ~finally~ bring DX11 to the forefront, and get us finally migrating away from DX9.

  • forcelimaforcelima Member UncommonPosts: 232

    Thank you to you all for the replies just to let you all know I went with the http://www.amazon.com/Gigabyte-GDDR5-2GB-WINDFORCE-Graphics-GV-N770OC-2GD/dp/B00CU9GOAE with free 2 day shipping and a copy of Splinter Cell Blacklist

  • grndzrogrndzro Member UncommonPosts: 1,162
    Originally posted by Ridelynn

     


    Originally posted by grndzro
    Radeon 9000 series is just around the corner. With next gen being centered around AMD I would wait a few months and grab one.

     

    AMD have all next gen consoles so going AMD should be a no brainer.


     

    No leaked benchmarks, no pictures of engineering samples, no Chinese-translated web sites.

    Just around the corner is still a ways off. AMD isn't changing the process node, and is only doing some minor updates to GCN2.0.

    I would bet the cards will be about 10-15% faster than what we see now, but still won't challenge Titan. The best case scenario is that it forces down nVidia's pricing and provides some direct competition against the 770/780, and we see a lot more performance for the dollar in the $150-350 price range (where most people are buying anyway).

    The 9000 series will be nice (the 8k series is supposed to be OEM only for some god forsaken reason), but it won't be earthshaking and I don't know that it would necessarily be worth waiting for. Particularly when all the signs point to a late fall release at best.

    As far as AMD having all the next-gen consoles - that part is true. But I don't think that will have a meaningful impact on PC GPU performance. The drivers for those GPUs are baked into the Consoles, and will have little to do with Windows/Linux/OSX drivers, and they aren't terribly powerful GPUs in the first place.

    The best thing the next-gen consoles will do for PC gaming is hopefully ~finally~ bring DX11 to the forefront, and get us finally migrating away from DX9.

    http://www.maximumpc.com/rounding_leaked_specs_amds_radeon_hd_9970_graphics_card

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 24,846
    Originally posted by grndzro
    Originally posted by Ridelynn

     


    Originally posted by grndzro
    Radeon 9000 series is just around the corner. With next gen being centered around AMD I would wait a few months and grab one.

     

    AMD have all next gen consoles so going AMD should be a no brainer.


     

    No leaked benchmarks, no pictures of engineering samples, no Chinese-translated web sites.

    Just around the corner is still a ways off. AMD isn't changing the process node, and is only doing some minor updates to GCN2.0.

    I would bet the cards will be about 10-15% faster than what we see now, but still won't challenge Titan. The best case scenario is that it forces down nVidia's pricing and provides some direct competition against the 770/780, and we see a lot more performance for the dollar in the $150-350 price range (where most people are buying anyway).

    The 9000 series will be nice (the 8k series is supposed to be OEM only for some god forsaken reason), but it won't be earthshaking and I don't know that it would necessarily be worth waiting for. Particularly when all the signs point to a late fall release at best.

    As far as AMD having all the next-gen consoles - that part is true. But I don't think that will have a meaningful impact on PC GPU performance. The drivers for those GPUs are baked into the Consoles, and will have little to do with Windows/Linux/OSX drivers, and they aren't terribly powerful GPUs in the first place.

    The best thing the next-gen consoles will do for PC gaming is hopefully ~finally~ bring DX11 to the forefront, and get us finally migrating away from DX9.

    http://www.maximumpc.com/rounding_leaked_specs_amds_radeon_hd_9970_graphics_card

    That's not a leak.  That's a jumble of made-up numbers from a random person with Internet access.

    I doubt that AMD could launch a 4770-like tiny "let's see if the new process node works at all" chip on 20 nm in October, let alone a mammoth chip with 8 channels of GDDR5.

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