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hockeyplayrhockeyplayr Member UncommonPosts: 604

I am looking into getting a desktop since I am tired of playing games in my free time on a laptop.  I know the recommendation is building one however I would rather just pay extra to have something right out of the box and not have to pick parts.  Knowing that this costs a premium how does this look for the price?

http://www.microcenter.com/product/410492/G188_Desktop_Computer

I play mostly mmo's and sometimes will delve into a single player rpg or shooter.

 

Thanks

*Edit I know the ram isn't that great at 1333 mhz

**Edit Now leaning toward building a comp. If anyone has any recommendations for parts from microcenter.  If I am building looking to spend around $1000 with os, surge protector, and monitor (have some buffer room to go over if need be)

Comments

  • BlastoTheRocketBoyBlastoTheRocketBoy Member UncommonPosts: 16

    That's honestly (at a quick glance without further component research) probably not all that bad, depending on shipping. BUT, I HIGHLY recommend you check out the pre-built pc's and OPEN-BOX or discount items on Newegg, as i scored my brother a simply amazing desktop a few years back for 400$ at the time worth more like 700 with what was in it. I'd say if you're tech saavy enough you would benefit greatly from building your own. I recently did on 800$ and I built a gaming BEAST! (looks bada$$ to boot :{P)

     

    Cheers!

     

    -Blasto

  • AbimorAbimor Member UncommonPosts: 502
    I would do what blasto said and check newegg.com first they have great deals.
  • hockeyplayrhockeyplayr Member UncommonPosts: 604
    Originally posted by BlastoTheRocketBoy

    That's honestly (at a quick glance without further component research) probably not all that bad, depending on shipping. BUT, I HIGHLY recommend you check out the pre-built pc's and OPEN-BOX or discount items on Newegg, as i scored my brother a simply amazing desktop a few years back for 400$ at the time worth more like 700 with what was in it. I'd say if you're tech saavy enough you would benefit greatly from building your own. I recently did on 800$ and I built a gaming BEAST! (looks bada$$ to boot :{P)

     

    Cheers!

     

    -Blasto

    The advantage of microcenter is I live near it so I can pick it up in store about an hour after ordering it.  However I am looking at their part prices and they are on par or better than newegg.  May build one if anyone can recommend parts (tech savvy enough to build one but not pick out whats good myself) from their site because I hate waiting on shipping (I have a bad I need it now problem).

    Edit if anyone has any recommendations, I'd probably want to spend around $1000 with a monitor, os, and surge protector but less is always better :)

  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 6,834

    I wouldn't.

    There's too many unknowns -
    what brand power supply? what type of RAM (there's a lot of different 1333 RAM out there)? Which SSD? etc.

    A similar computer, using all quality components with respectable warranties would probably cost about the same, but you have the benefit of having warranties going out 3-5 years (and maybe more), as well as having higher quality parts in the first place limiting the chance of something breaking at all.

  • hockeyplayrhockeyplayr Member UncommonPosts: 604
    Originally posted by Ridelynn

    I wouldn't.

    There's too many unknowns -
    what brand power supply? what type of RAM (there's a lot of different 1333 RAM out there)? Which SSD? etc.

    A similar computer, using all quality components with respectable warranties would probably cost about the same, but you have the benefit of having warranties going out 3-5 years (and maybe more), as well as having higher quality parts in the first place limiting the chance of something breaking at all.

    this is true, I went to the manufactures' website and they don't say what brand either which is sketchy.  The only model they specify on is their $1500 computer.

  • syntax42syntax42 Member UncommonPosts: 1,378
    Originally posted by Ridelynn

    I wouldn't.

    There's too many unknowns -
    what brand power supply? what type of RAM (there's a lot of different 1333 RAM out there)? Which SSD? etc.

    A similar computer, using all quality components with respectable warranties would probably cost about the same, but you have the benefit of having warranties going out 3-5 years (and maybe more), as well as having higher quality parts in the first place limiting the chance of something breaking at all.

    Exactly this.

     

    The component quality matters, and if they don't state the brand, chances are you're getting low-quality parts.

    Did you try to price those parts out using quality brands at MicroCenter?  I find their prices fairly competitive with online stores, and I do like the convenience of being able to pick items up the same day.

  • hockeyplayrhockeyplayr Member UncommonPosts: 604
    Originally posted by syntax42
    Originally posted by Ridelynn

    I wouldn't.

    There's too many unknowns -
    what brand power supply? what type of RAM (there's a lot of different 1333 RAM out there)? Which SSD? etc.

    A similar computer, using all quality components with respectable warranties would probably cost about the same, but you have the benefit of having warranties going out 3-5 years (and maybe more), as well as having higher quality parts in the first place limiting the chance of something breaking at all.

    Exactly this.

     

    The component quality matters, and if they don't state the brand, chances are you're getting low-quality parts.

    Did you try to price those parts out using quality brands at MicroCenter?  I find their prices fairly competitive with online stores, and I do like the convenience of being able to pick items up the same day.

    Priced it up with quality parts (not sure if they would go together though) and it actually came out $45 cheaper

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,098
    Originally posted by Ridelynn

    I wouldn't.

    There's too many unknowns -
    what brand power supply? what type of RAM (there's a lot of different 1333 RAM out there)? Which SSD? etc.

    A similar computer, using all quality components with respectable warranties would probably cost about the same, but you have the benefit of having warranties going out 3-5 years (and maybe more), as well as having higher quality parts in the first place limiting the chance of something breaking at all.

    Precisely.

    To give more detail, the general rule is that if a part is good, the company will tell you, as that's a selling point.  Equivalently, if they won't tell you what a part is, it's probably junk.

    Micro Center is quite capable of listing exact parts when they want to.  For example, they tell you that they're using an Intel Core i5-3570K.

    So why don't they tell you the power supply?  They give you two lines of information about it, including the "Combined +12V Rating", but they can't list a simple brand name and model?  Most likely, the power supply is junk, and they don't want you to know it.

    And how about the motherboard?  By my count, they give you 22 lines of specs on the motherboard scattered through the page.  Yet they can't take a single line to tell you the brand name and model, which would tell you those other 22 in a single line.  Again, the motherboard is probably junk.

    And how about the SSD?  They take two lines there, including telling you that it's SATA 6 Gb/s, which basically all recent SSDs are.  But they can't give a brand name and model?  Most likely it's a Phison- or JMicron-based piece of junk that they're trying to get rid of.

    -----

    If you're unable or unwilling to build your own, then the next best thing is to buy from a site that will let you pick the exact parts that they use.  A site that takes 116 lines of specs to only tell you two of the parts in the entire machine (case and processor) is trying to make it look like they give you the specs even as they hide things.

  • syntax42syntax42 Member UncommonPosts: 1,378
    Originally posted by hockeyplayr
     

    Priced it up with quality parts (not sure if they would go together though) and it actually came out $45 cheaper

    If you want someone to check over your parts list, posting links to each item makes it fairly easy to do so.

    There isn't much to mess up when building computers.  Modern components that are available to consumers mostly follow the same standards.  If you want to check for yourself, here is what to look for, compatibility-wise:

    If motherboard is ATX form factor, case must be too.  Power supply should also be ATX.  A micro-ATX motherboard fits in a full ATX case, but not the other way around.  If you looked at some other motherboard form factor, you might not be getting the right parts for a gaming rig.

    The CPU socket type on the motherboard should match the CPU.  For example, LGA1155 is the most common Intel socket type, while AM3+ is the socket type you should have for an AMD system.

    Your motherboard and CPU must be compatible with your RAM type.  This should be DDR 3.  The speed depends on what your motherboard and CPU are compatible with, but it isn't a big deal to run RAM under its maximum rated frequency.  Check the motherboard manufacturer's website to find a list of supported memory modules and part numbers if you want to have some assurance of the chosen RAM working.  Unlisted RAM often works fine, though.

    There isn't any way I know of to mess up video card compatibility with the motherboard now.  Pretty much everything has a PCI x16 slot for the video card.  However, make sure your power supply has enough connectors for the chosen video card's power ports.

    The power supply is the last major component I look at.  There is a lot that goes into choosing a good power supply.  To make things simple, go 50% over your combined TDP of your motherboard, video card, CPU, and add 25 watts for each mechanical drive you plan to install, and 10 watts for each case fan.  That's going to be overkill on wattage, but it gives you room to put more/better stuff in the computer later without swapping the power supply.

     

    Forgot to mention drives.  Pretty much everything is going to be using SATA these days.  Those are backwards-compatible if you have an older SATA drive and a newer motherboard.  If you have an IDE drive, check your motherboard to see if it has the connector(s) for it.

  • hockeyplayrhockeyplayr Member UncommonPosts: 604
    Originally posted by Quizzical
    Originally posted by Ridelynn

    I wouldn't.

    There's too many unknowns -
    what brand power supply? what type of RAM (there's a lot of different 1333 RAM out there)? Which SSD? etc.

    A similar computer, using all quality components with respectable warranties would probably cost about the same, but you have the benefit of having warranties going out 3-5 years (and maybe more), as well as having higher quality parts in the first place limiting the chance of something breaking at all.

    Precisely.

    To give more detail, the general rule is that if a part is good, the company will tell you, as that's a selling point.  Equivalently, if they won't tell you what a part is, it's probably junk.

    Micro Center is quite capable of listing exact parts when they want to.  For example, they tell you that they're using an Intel Core i5-3570K.

    So why don't they tell you the power supply?  They give you two lines of information about it, including the "Combined +12V Rating", but they can't list a simple brand name and model?  Most likely, the power supply is junk, and they don't want you to know it.

    And how about the motherboard?  By my count, they give you 22 lines of specs on the motherboard scattered through the page.  Yet they can't take a single line to tell you the brand name and model, which would tell you those other 22 in a single line.  Again, the motherboard is probably junk.

    And how about the SSD?  They take two lines there, including telling you that it's SATA 6 Gb/s, which basically all recent SSDs are.  But they can't give a brand name and model?  Most likely it's a Phison- or JMicron-based piece of junk that they're trying to get rid of.

    -----

    If you're unable or unwilling to build your own, then the next best thing is to buy from a site that will let you pick the exact parts that they use.  A site that takes 116 lines of specs to only tell you two of the parts in the entire machine (case and processor) is trying to make it look like they give you the specs even as they hide things.

    I've been doing research and I am going to build my own, you helped me pick out parts for my cousin back in January, got any recommendations for $1000-1200 with peripherals? Not sure how much the release of Haswell will effect prices and what is still good etc..

  • BattlerockBattlerock Member CommonPosts: 1,393
    Dont buy a desktop unless your going to completely deck it out. Your going to miss laptop to much. Get an asus g75vx its quiet as a mouse and awesome graphics with a 3bg gtx670mx gw2 looks amazing and like I said quiet as a mouse. Got mine new for 950
  • hockeyplayrhockeyplayr Member UncommonPosts: 604
    Originally posted by KingofHartz
    Dont buy a desktop unless your going to completely deck it out. Your going to miss laptop to much. Get an asus g75vx its quiet as a mouse and awesome graphics with a 3bg gtx670mx gw2 looks amazing and like I said quiet as a mouse. Got mine new for 950

    right now I have a lenovo laptop that I used for gaming and a macbook air for coding and such.  I don't think I'll miss the laptop too much since I basically sit down at a table with it to play and don't take it anywhere

  • hockeyplayrhockeyplayr Member UncommonPosts: 604
    Originally posted by syntax42
    Originally posted by hockeyplayr
     

    Priced it up with quality parts (not sure if they would go together though) and it actually came out $45 cheaper

    If you want someone to check over your parts list, posting links to each item makes it fairly easy to do so.

    There isn't much to mess up when building computers.  Modern components that are available to consumers mostly follow the same standards.  If you want to check for yourself, here is what to look for, compatibility-wise:

    If motherboard is ATX form factor, case must be too.  Power supply should also be ATX.  A micro-ATX motherboard fits in a full ATX case, but not the other way around.  If you looked at some other motherboard form factor, you might not be getting the right parts for a gaming rig.

    The CPU socket type on the motherboard should match the CPU.  For example, LGA1155 is the most common Intel socket type, while AM3+ is the socket type you should have for an AMD system.

    Your motherboard and CPU must be compatible with your RAM type.  This should be DDR 3.  The speed depends on what your motherboard and CPU are compatible with, but it isn't a big deal to run RAM under its maximum rated frequency.  Check the motherboard manufacturer's website to find a list of supported memory modules and part numbers if you want to have some assurance of the chosen RAM working.  Unlisted RAM often works fine, though.

    There isn't any way I know of to mess up video card compatibility with the motherboard now.  Pretty much everything has a PCI x16 slot for the video card.  However, make sure your power supply has enough connectors for the chosen video card's power ports.

    The power supply is the last major component I look at.  There is a lot that goes into choosing a good power supply.  To make things simple, go 50% over your combined TDP of your motherboard, video card, CPU, and add 25 watts for each mechanical drive you plan to install, and 10 watts for each case fan.  That's going to be overkill on wattage, but it gives you room to put more/better stuff in the computer later without swapping the power supply.

     

    Forgot to mention drives.  Pretty much everything is going to be using SATA these days.  Those are backwards-compatible if you have an older SATA drive and a newer motherboard.  If you have an IDE drive, check your motherboard to see if it has the connector(s) for it.

    Thanks for the explanation. Helps clarify some things.  However the problem I have is knowing what is good as far as future proofing the machine.  And so I don't sound lazy by asking here is what I was toying around with not sure if there is a better case for the money or which mobo and psu I should go with.  I read good things about the AsRock mobos but also heard alot are DOA.  Also not sure if there is a better card for the money, I noticed it's clocked slightly higher than the other gtx 660s

     

    here is the link: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/11aiE

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Member LegendaryPosts: 21,098

    Don't rush out and buy something dumb that you'll regret for several years.

    Do you want an all-Micro Center build?  Or are you fine with buying parts from random sites?

  • hockeyplayrhockeyplayr Member UncommonPosts: 604
    Originally posted by Quizzical

    Don't rush out and buy something dumb that you'll regret for several years.

    Do you want an all-Micro Center build?  Or are you fine with buying parts from random sites?

    I like the idea of getting the parts in person but if I can save a decent amount I have no problem ordering.  I think I want to get the CPU there because they are having pretty goo deals right now like the i5 for only $170...the catch, in store pick up only 

  • syntax42syntax42 Member UncommonPosts: 1,378
    Originally posted by hockeyplayr

    However the problem I have is knowing what is good as far as future proofing the machine.  

    Simply put, you can't future-proof a piece of technology.  A new video card or better processor could be announced the day after you build your computer and you have to be satisfied with what you bought instead of worrying about what you could have bought if you had waited.

    The only thing you can do is leave room for expansion and upgrades, but that can only take you so far.  Your motherboard's CPU socket will be made obsolete, limiting the potential for CPU upgrades.  The BIOS and chipset might not be compatible with newer CPUs, even if the socket is the same.  Video card slots have remained the same for a while now, and it doesn't appear to be changing soon, so you can plan on at least one video card upgrade in the computer's life-span.  RAM is something you might add more of.  Start out with 8 GB spread across two slots and plan to upgrade to 16 some day.  If you get a power supply that is better than you need by a fair margin, that will enable you to upgrade to higher-powered video cards and add drives and other components.

     

    To summarize, plan on upgrading the RAM, video card, and CPU in the life of the computer.  That can extend the useful life of a system, but it may only take you from 20-30 FPS to 40-60 FPS in whatever game you're upgrading for.

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