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It's been months...still not sure about this computer build...

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  • Nope. The way my work does pay is through a debit card, and they transfer the money onto it at sometime that night...I was hoping it was going to be dead on 12:00 a.m. but I was wrong.

  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,375


    Originally posted by czekoskwigel

    Originally posted by Nunez1212
    I'm confused at what your saying Robgmur, but it does seem like a nice board besides the fact that I'm not sure how great of qualiyt Asrock is.
    ASrock has made many great boards, though I wouldn't say that their quality is as consistent as Asus or Gigabyte.  Generally Fatality doesn't slap his name on garbage, though...

    ASRock used to be Asus - they spun off their custom OEM and low-end motherboard division into it's own company (ASRock) back in 2003 or so. Lately (in the past year or two), ASRock has been trying to get into the higher end market under it's own name. It's first few "high end" or gaming-class products were a bit underwhelming, but lately it has got some pretty good reviews.

    The only problem is that they have only been competitive for the last generation or so of motherboards. Nothing at all wrong with them right now, they just don't have quite the history that some of the other companies do yet.

    As far as the Fatal1ty brand name goes - that's just marketing baloney, and he will slap his name on nearly anything related to gaming just for the promotional bucks. I wouldn't sink an ounce of faith just in the fact that he put his name on something.

  • That's more or less how I thought about it, but I did not order it for the Fatality name. I ordered it because it had great reviews and a very nice set of features.

  • CatamountCatamount Member Posts: 773

    Seconded on the Fatal1ty name.

     

    It's true that I've never seen his name on downright disastrous products, in the sense that some budget and a reasonably well-established company needs to have the dollars to pay for the name to begin with, but at the same time, it's hardly a case where all of his products are good. There's a lot of mediocre junk in there, too.

     

    The Creative Fatal1ty gaming headset is less than $40 for a reason; it's not that great. It's not terrible by any means, but it's definitely a cheaper product with lower-end performance. The OCZ Fatal1ty 550W modular PSU isn't worth any more praise. It's absolutely the epitome of mediocrity. The ripple on it only barely stays in spec, the voltage regulation is so-so, the physical quality of the unit's construction is so-so, the capacitors are the lowest end you'll get from an even remotely passable brand, and the efficiency of the unit is, well, mediocre.

     

    In this case though, this motherboard is well-reviewed, so it seems like it'll certainly work well enough. It might lack a bell or whistle, but the substance is all there.

  • DONE! Everthing has been successfully shipped out and I will be receiving it early next week. Now I just have to hope and pray I don't get any DOA items.


  • Originally posted by Ridelynn

    Stress testing:

    Run Prime95 (this stresses your CPU and a bit of memory) - let it run for an hour or two, if it doesn't say anything is wrong, your good with that.

    Furmark - run it for an hour or so, if you don't see any artifacts (strange lines or colors popping across the screen) - your good to go with video

    That's about all I do for stress testing as long as those two pass. If your computer randomly reboots during the tests, crashes, or tells you that it failed a test, then you need to do some investigation.

    (edit)

    Forgot to mention it's nice to have a temperature monitor program installed when you do this. Stress testing will also tell you the maximum temperature of components you should ever expect. Should your temps be ~very~ high it could indicate a heat sink or fan isn't working properly. And in the future, if your temps deviate much from what you see during your stress test, you'll know something has gone wrong. I like SpeedFan, it's free and tells you what you need to know. There are a bajillion other temp monitors though.

    If a part is broken, DOA, or whatever, first you try to RMA it back to whomever you bought it from. Most places will just do a straight exchange. In rare cases, they will refer you back to the manufacturer and turn it in on warranty exchange, which works more or less the same way but takes a bit longer to process.

    How do I know what is TOO hot and such with the speedfan. I'm using it to test some stuff out on the video card since I already have that, but it randomly shows a flame and then it says it's good...so how do I know if it's at an exceptable temperature or not?

     

    Update:

    I just ran furmark for about 30 minutes and the gtx 260 maxed out at 83 celsius..it smells like burnt toast in here now, so I aborted the testing at that time. Is that ok?!

  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,375


    Originally posted by Nunez1212

    Originally posted by Ridelynn
    Stress testing:
    Run Prime95 (this stresses your CPU and a bit of memory) - let it run for an hour or two, if it doesn't say anything is wrong, your good with that.
    Furmark - run it for an hour or so, if you don't see any artifacts (strange lines or colors popping across the screen) - your good to go with video
    That's about all I do for stress testing as long as those two pass. If your computer randomly reboots during the tests, crashes, or tells you that it failed a test, then you need to do some investigation.
    (edit)
    Forgot to mention it's nice to have a temperature monitor program installed when you do this. Stress testing will also tell you the maximum temperature of components you should ever expect. Should your temps be ~very~ high it could indicate a heat sink or fan isn't working properly. And in the future, if your temps deviate much from what you see during your stress test, you'll know something has gone wrong. I like SpeedFan, it's free and tells you what you need to know. There are a bajillion other temp monitors though.
    If a part is broken, DOA, or whatever, first you try to RMA it back to whomever you bought it from. Most places will just do a straight exchange. In rare cases, they will refer you back to the manufacturer and turn it in on warranty exchange, which works more or less the same way but takes a bit longer to process.
    How do I know what is TOO hot and such with the speedfan. I'm using it to test some stuff out on the video card since I already have that, but it randomly shows a flame and then it says it's good...so how do I know if it's at an exceptable temperature or not?
     
    Update:
    I just ran furmark for about 30 minutes and the gtx 260 maxed out at 83 celsius..it smells like burnt toast in here now, so I aborted the testing at that time. Is that ok?!

    You can set the "flame" or alert temperatures to whatever you want. They probably default to around 70C or so.

    The real answer is chips can run as hot as they are capable of doing so. If it didn't glitch out, your 260 is fine at 83C then. They will start glitching when they start to overheat (you see random color spots, overheating, BSOD's, flat out reboots or power shutdowns in extreme cases), and whatever temperature that happens to be, that happens to be. It looks like "typical" maximum temperatures for a 260 is around the mid-80's, so that's not too unusual.

    http://www.nvnews.net/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=116578

    Most new silicon can run as high as 100C and be ok.

    Of course, the cooler the better.

  • So...the burning smell is ok?

  • Loke666Loke666 Member EpicPosts: 21,441

    Originally posted by Ridelynn

    You can set the "flame" or alert temperatures to whatever you want. They probably default to around 70C or so.

    The real answer is chips can run as hot as they are capable of doing so. If it didn't glitch out, your 260 is fine at 83C then. They will start glitching when they start to overheat (you see random color spots, overheating, BSOD's, flat out reboots or power shutdowns in extreme cases), and whatever temperature that happens to be, that happens to be. It looks like "typical" maximum temperatures for a 260 is around the mid-80's, so that's not too unusual.

    http://www.nvnews.net/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=116578

    Most new silicon can run as high as 100C and be ok.

    Of course, the cooler the better.

    That can't be right, my 480 GTX (Fermi) is famous for being hot and it is around 50C on normal use and 60C when playing games that uses a lot of juice. The 480 is a high end card and famous for being one of the hottest, the 260 is just a mid range card. I have a big case though, and it is open always (it actually seems to be cooler when I opens it then when I have it closed with all fans, and it is a lot less noicy.

    Anything over 70C is a source of worrying, it is easy to damage the GPU if it overheats.

    My suggestion: Start by looking on the temperature inside the box. See that it have fans working both pulling in and out air and see so dust isn't covering the airholes. Check so your harddrives ain't too close to the GPU, they should preferably be as far as possibly from the rest. Clean the fan of the GFX card from dust.

    Use Riva tuner (or similar program) to increase the speed of the GPU fan.

    If you still have an issue it is time to actually get a new GPU fan, or to consider water cooling.

  • Loke666Loke666 Member EpicPosts: 21,441

    Originally posted by Nunez1212

    So...the burning smell is ok?

    Electronics that smells burning is never ok, particularly if they are your own.

    Fire = bad. Beer = Good.

  • Well it's not usually this hot...it was only this hot under Furmarks intense burn in testing. Besides that it sits at about 46C...though this is also after not cleaning it for months and months..

  • GruntyGrunty Member EpicPosts: 8,657

    Burning electric components or burning dust. If the first then don't do that. If the second then clean the inside of the case.

    "I used to think the worst thing in life was to be all alone.  It's not.  The worst thing in life is to end up with people who make you feel all alone."  Robin Williams
  • CatamountCatamount Member Posts: 773

    GPUs can get up to 80 without any kind of problem, whatsoever, even long term. 90 is a problem, however. The GPU will run, but it'll shorten life. For CPUs it varies chip by chip, but Intel's chips have a fairly high tolerance for temperature. Usually I just take whatever Intel's max temp is and assume anything 10C under is safe for long-term use. That means that your i5 2500 should be fine up to the high 60s.

  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,375

    TMax for a Sandy Bridge is 100C, with auto-throttling set at around 95-98C. So they can safely run up to that temperature, and probably for years, but the cooler you keep it the happier it will be, and with any decent cooler it would be difficult to get a Sandy Bridge that hot unless you forget to plug in the fan or something.

    Again, cooler is better, but 80-90 isn't abnormal. And Furmark is a worst case scenario - it totally stresses the living crap out of video cards, so if it doesn't break under Furmark, it probably isn't ever going to break.

    The 260 is a different chip, with a different cooler, than the 480. The 480 was notorious for putting out heat, but the temperature that it runs at is dependent on a lot of other factors too. Temperature is just one measurement, and it's a highly subjective one that doesn't tell the complete story alone. And try running Furmark, rather than just games, and see what that temperature ends up getting to.

  • CatamountCatamount Member Posts: 773

    That sounds about right, depending on how you're looking at temp, but Intel's site lists a maximum Tcase temp (about 73C), so that's what any temp monitoring program should measure, afaik

  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,375


    Originally posted by Catamount
    That sounds about right, depending on how you're looking at temp, but Intel's site lists a maximum Tcase temp (about 73C), so that's what any temp monitoring program should measure, afaik

    Close.

    The per-core thermocouples actually read in "Delta from TMax" - most programs convert this to a relative reading (TMax is a static number and won't change in a given processor line) to give you an absolute temperature. TCase is the temperature measured at the top of the heat shield (directly on top of the CPU, but underneath the thermal paste and heat sink) - that temp will typically be lower than in-die temps because it has to go through all the silicon and the heat shield itself, and will be a more or less average temperature from all the cores and GPU, rather than per-core or per-GPU (although I don't have a Sandy Bridge to verify this, this is the case on my Nehalem's and C2D's).

    There is a thermocouple that is located just underneath the heat shield, this one is usually labeled as "CPU" or "CPUTIN" and it will be the closest thing to TCase. Technically, TCase is the temperature on top of the heat shield (but before the TIM and Heatsink), and this diode is on the underneath of the heat shield, but it's pretty close and the temps will vary proportionally. This thermocouple is notoriously inaccurate since it has to be processed by the motherboard BIOS, and doesn't have any reference temperature (unlike the core thermocouples, which are relative to TMax).

    Monitoring programs can access any of these thermocouples, usually they will list the Core ones as Core0/1/2/3, and the TCase one as just CPU or CPUTIN.

    Using HWMonitor just as an example (because it lists all the sensors individually), if I fire up [email protected] and let it sit a minute, my CPU core temps (on-die) read 39/37/44/39C (4 cores), and the CPU Temp measured by the motherboard lists 38C. Now these temps sound low because it takes my system hours to stabilize to their peak temperatures (lot of water in my cooler) - if I let it run all night they would be closer to 55-60C.

    TCase is not an engineering limit, it's just a guideline - this is what the top of the heat spreader should not exceed so long as everything else is working properly and you are below TMax. TMax is the engineering limit. If you hit TMax on any core, the CPU throttles down (actually it throttles down 3-5C below TMax).

    Here's a good read:

    http://www.techreaction.net/2009/10/14/guide-to-understanding-intel-temperatures/

  • Yeah well the pieces come in today so hopefully nothing is doa and I don't blow up the house....I think that's nearly impossible and I've built pc's with cheapo parts before so I highly doubt that the first time I use quality parts I will destroy anything. I will repost updates to this post as soon as I am further with progress.

    Update: 10:51 PM Central Time, 11/8/2011

    I succesfully installed all of the hardware. There were a few troubleshooting problems that I had to do here and there, but after not to much time I have completed the process. The system works SUPER fast and I and quite happy with the results! I have updated the systems drivers and absolutely love my new build! I am READY....yes I'm talking to you skyrim...    Anyways...the only thing that I"m not sure how to do just yet is how to install a video game or something on my normal 320GB HDD and use it such as an application while I am using the OS on my SSD...not sure how that works and I do not have to much space on the SSD so yeah...can't put everything on here, was just plannig on putting the OS and my major games.

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