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how to make win7 support more than 4gb ran

earth2011earth2011 Member Posts: 131

I have 2  4gb g skill ram and win 7 pro only supports 3.4 gb . Is there a way to make win 7 use all 8gb or more than 4 so it can use both sticks ?

 

Thanks

Comments

  • JayFiveAliveJayFiveAlive Member UncommonPosts: 596

    The 4GB ram limit is a 32 bit problem. I would guess that's what version of windows you are on?

     

    If you get the 64 bit version of Windows 7, you will be able to use much much more than 8gb of ram.

  • merieke82merieke82 Member Posts: 165

    To support > 4gb ram you need the 64bit version of Win7. Of course you'll need to make sure your hardware will work with it first.

  • Siris23Siris23 Member UncommonPosts: 387

    It sounds like you've got win7 32bit installed, it's capped at under 4GB. The only way to get it to use all 8GB is to install win7 64bit instead.

  • earth2011earth2011 Member Posts: 131

    after a little reasearch on google i manage to find a way to do it

    here is the proof  bloody microsoft

    image

  • nero_usrnero_usr Member Posts: 14

    What they mean, is you must have a dual core, quad core, phenom or i-3 etc processor for the 64 bit os to run correctly.

  • merieke82merieke82 Member Posts: 165

    Originally posted by earth2011

    after a little reasearch on google i manage to find a way to do it

    here is the proof

    image

     

    lol, dont confuse people

  • HewraHewra Member UncommonPosts: 24

    LIES!

    image

  • earth2011earth2011 Member Posts: 131

    a

  • nero_usrnero_usr Member Posts: 14

    It might show it, but it most likely will gain no benefit from it. And don't bump your post with one letter replies. If it's worthy of being noticed, it will stand out on its own merits.

  • VrikaVrika Member EpicPosts: 6,437

    Windows 7 32 bit doesn't support more than 4gb of RAM. The limits are posted here: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7itproperf/thread/5a518386-27a8-46fa-a85a-678b7c25358e

    When I bought Windows 7 I got both 32 bit and 64 bit versions with the same package. I'd suggest checking if you have disc for both but have installed the wrong version.

     
  • CatamountCatamount Member Posts: 773

    Originally posted by nero_usr

    It might show it, but it most likely will gain no benefit from it. And don't bump your post with one letter replies. If it's worthy of being noticed, it will stand out on its own merits.

    Exactly. Windows 7 might be smart enough to recognize that you physically have 8GB worth of DIMMs installed, but a 32-bit copy of Windows 7 CANNOT use more than 4GB, total (that's with all devices), and CANNOT address more than about 3GB of RAM after your video RAM and other hardware are done taking up their address space.

     

    The RAM limit isn't something coded into Windows, OP, it's a mathematical limit, and it is mathematically impossible to violate. Give it up. If you want more RAM, then you must purcahse a 64-bit copy of the OS.

  • earth2011earth2011 Member Posts: 131

    i got a 64 bit win7 from my uni -   i bet there is a way to do it but all patches  are kernel patches and  may result in hardware problems  and  my system will be open  to  exploits. i will try the 64 bit and see

  • mmogawdmmogawd Member Posts: 732

    Originally posted by Catamount

    Originally posted by nero_usr

    It might show it, but it most likely will gain no benefit from it. And don't bump your post with one letter replies. If it's worthy of being noticed, it will stand out on its own merits.

    Exactly. Windows 7 might be smart enough to recognize that you physically have 8GB worth of DIMMs installed, but a 32-bit copy of Windows 7 CANNOT use more than 4GB, total (that's with all devices), and CANNOT address more than about 3GB of RAM after your video RAM and other hardware are done taking up their address space.

     

    The RAM limit isn't something coded into Windows, OP, it's a mathematical limit, and it is mathematically impossible to violate. Give it up. If you want more RAM, then you must purcahse a 64-bit copy of the OS.

    That's not entirely accurate...

    http://forums.techarena.in/tips-tweaks/979407.htm

  • merieke82merieke82 Member Posts: 165

    Originally posted by mmogawd

    Originally posted by Catamount


    Originally posted by nero_usr

    It might show it, but it most likely will gain no benefit from it. And don't bump your post with one letter replies. If it's worthy of being noticed, it will stand out on its own merits.

    Exactly. Windows 7 might be smart enough to recognize that you physically have 8GB worth of DIMMs installed, but a 32-bit copy of Windows 7 CANNOT use more than 4GB, total (that's with all devices), and CANNOT address more than about 3GB of RAM after your video RAM and other hardware are done taking up their address space.

     

    The RAM limit isn't something coded into Windows, OP, it's a mathematical limit, and it is mathematically impossible to violate. Give it up. If you want more RAM, then you must purcahse a 64-bit copy of the OS.

    That's not entirely accurate...

    http://forums.techarena.in/tips-tweaks/979407.htm

     

    That's an interesting find, though unfortunately may not be that useful.

    "The operating system uses page tables to map this 4-GB address space into the 64 GB of physical memory. The mapping is typically applied differently for each process. In this way, the extra memory is useful even though no single regular application can access it all simultaneously."

    "The 32-bit size of the virtual address is not changed, so regular application software continues to use instructions with 32-bit addresses and (in a flat memory model) is limited to 4 gigabytes of virtual address space."

     

  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,061


    Originally posted by mmogawd
    That's not entirely accurate...
    http://forums.techarena.in/tips-tweaks/979407.htm

    But very close to the truth. All of the consumer OS's (XP, Vista, 7), in 32-bit mode, even with PAE enabled, still have a 4-GB limit.

    So yes, it is possible to work around the 4G limit, and PAE is one way that some 32-bit versions of OSes can (Windows Server editions, Linux, OS X, etc), but consumer Windows editions don't do anything with it (They support PAE, but only as a means to enable DEP, and do not extend the physical RAM limitation with it).

  • ShinamiShinami Member UncommonPosts: 825

    Your question

     

    "How to make win7 support more than 4GB RAM?" 

     

    "You can't make it support more than 4GB's worth of memory addresses. Please upgrade to a 64-bit OS if you've reached the limit. There really is no excuse at not upgrading a system to handle your hardware!" 

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • mmogawdmmogawd Member Posts: 732

    Originally posted by merieke82

    Originally posted by mmogawd


    Originally posted by Catamount


    Originally posted by nero_usr

    It might show it, but it most likely will gain no benefit from it. And don't bump your post with one letter replies. If it's worthy of being noticed, it will stand out on its own merits.

    Exactly. Windows 7 might be smart enough to recognize that you physically have 8GB worth of DIMMs installed, but a 32-bit copy of Windows 7 CANNOT use more than 4GB, total (that's with all devices), and CANNOT address more than about 3GB of RAM after your video RAM and other hardware are done taking up their address space.

     

    The RAM limit isn't something coded into Windows, OP, it's a mathematical limit, and it is mathematically impossible to violate. Give it up. If you want more RAM, then you must purcahse a 64-bit copy of the OS.

    That's not entirely accurate...

    http://forums.techarena.in/tips-tweaks/979407.htm

     

    That's an interesting find, though unfortunately may not be that useful.

    "The operating system uses page tables to map this 4-GB address space into the 64 GB of physical memory. The mapping is typically applied differently for each process. In this way, the extra memory is useful even though no single regular application can access it all simultaneously."

    "The 32-bit size of the virtual address is not changed, so regular application software continues to use instructions with 32-bit addresses and (in a flat memory model) is limited to 4 gigabytes of virtual address space."

     

    But the OS can access memory outside of the 4gb, leaving more open to applications.  That's how it was intended to work.

  • waynejr2waynejr2 Member EpicPosts: 7,768

    Originally posted by Vrika

    Windows 7 32 bit doesn't support more than 4gb of RAM. The limits are posted here: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7itproperf/thread/5a518386-27a8-46fa-a85a-678b7c25358e

    When I bought Windows 7 I got both 32 bit and 64 bit versions with the same package. I'd suggest checking if you have disc for both but have installed the wrong version.

     /this

    http://www.youhaventlived.com/qblog/2010/QBlog190810A.html  

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    Kyleran:  "Now there's the real trick, learning to accept and enjoy a game for what it offers rather than pass on what might be a great playing experience because it lacks a few features you prefer."

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    FreddyNoNose:  "A good game needs no defense; a bad game has no defense." "Easily digested content is just as easily forgotten."

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  • RidelynnRidelynn Member EpicPosts: 7,061


    Originally posted by mmogawd
    But the OS can access memory outside of the 4gb, leaving more open to applications.  That's how it was intended to work.

    No. That's not really how it was intended to work either. The way you have stated it here, it sounds like the old DOS model, where you have the lower 640k, High memory, and UMB access space. Windows doesn't segment memory like that any more, it uses a paged and protected memory model - the OS has the big pool of memory available (total hardware up to the PAE/OS coded limit, and virtual memory pool), and applications get to ask for chunks of it, and the Hardware and OS can then enforce security restrictions for programs accessing memory outside that which they have allocated specifically for them.

    Windows is limited to 2G per 32-bit application (3G if you enable it, similar to enabling PAE). On Server OS'es, the upper 4G+ memory space isn't there so the OS can use it, and leave the lower 4G for applications. The OS has access to the entire memory space, and it allows for multiple applications to utilize it, with each application limited to 2G/3G. So it really is not any different of a memory model, it's just a different method of addressing the available memory.

    There is some RAM that is allocated specifically for the OS, but PAE doesn't move that reserved memory into the upper 4G+ region, it just allows the OS to access that upper 4G+ region as part of it's total memory pool.

  • gigaxrgigaxr Member UncommonPosts: 613

    "Here’s the math for 32-bit systems:

    232 = 4,294,967,296 bytes

    4,294,967,296 / (1,024 x 1,024) = 4,096 MB = 4GB

    It’s different for 64-bit:

    264 = 18,446,744,073,709,551,616

    18,446,744,073,709,551,616 / (1,024 x 1,024) = 16EB (exabytes)"

    http://www.zdnet.com/blog/hardware/clearing-up-the-3264-bit-memory-limit-confusion/3124

     



     

    PAE is an option for 32-bit: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa366796%28v=vs.85%29.aspx

     

    However, you are much better off installing a 64-bit version of Windows. If you have the Retail package of Windows 7, it comes with both 32-bit and 64-bit. If you only have an OEM version, then you only get one or the other.

  • ShinamiShinami Member UncommonPosts: 825

    nice post gigat.

     

    Its not just that. If you wish to store a 64 bit variable through a 32 bit OS, you literally have to use three memory addresses. One address for half the 32 bits, One address for the other half and finally the third address to link them together. This is true even though memory has been 64 bits since SDRAM. 

     

    When you need a 64 bit variable, like a double in Java and run it under a 64 bit OS, you can address the full depth of the memory and need only one memory address to store the data instead of three.

     

    Remember that a 32 bit OS will pad with 0s the 32 bits that can not be addressed per memory address. In short, a 32 bit OS use 4096MB of memory address but can only address half the depth of each address...Which really means the maximum address efficiency is actually 50% with the average actually resting far lower than that....due to the number of variables requiring a third address to store a 64 bit variable and make it work in programming. ^_^ 

     

    Good post though. ^_^ keep it up. I like mathematics and logical reasoning vs "baseless claims" I've read from many people across the internet. 

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