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Linux and MMO's

JohnnyMotrinJohnnyMotrin Member UncommonPosts: 439

I've decided to stop being lazy and build my next PC. As I'm sure most at this site have built a PC at one time or another, I'd like to ask if anyone has gone with Linux over Windows?


I admit I'm not that educated on Linux however from my understanding you can't install anything from the web to your hard drive instead you have to save to a disk and install from there. Am I right about this because that would pretty much make Linux unusable for MMO's since you wouldn't be able to install patches and updates?


Somebody school me please! I'd like to go the Linux route since it's free, however a pc I can't play my MMO's on is virtually useless!

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Comments

  • JohnnyMotrinJohnnyMotrin Member UncommonPosts: 439

    Well I stumbled on a list of games that have a Linux client...


    EvE

    A Tale in the Desert 4

    Vendetta Online

    Regnum Online

    Second Life

    Dofus

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  • ScrimMalteseScrimMaltese Member Posts: 469

    If you're building your first computer for the first time, Linux is not the way to go. I know you know that Linux is not Windows, but I doubt you understand what that really means. Just buy Windows. It will save you a lot of headaches. Linux is not a very good OS to run as a general desktop, Windows is a much better choice. 

    Buying Windows should be included into the cost of building a new machine. Just as the Processor or Ram are. 


    I admit I'm not that educated on Linux however from my understanding you can't install anything from the web to your hard drive instead you have to save to a disk and install from there.
    That makes no sense, whether you are talking about Windows or Linux. You might as well have said "scribidly do boop pop".
  • JohnnyMotrinJohnnyMotrin Member UncommonPosts: 439

    No this isn't my first build, rather the first time thinking about installing Linux Ubuntu.  Why Isn't Linux a very good OS as a general desktop?  Ubuntu is suppose to be the most stable and easy to use OS for a pc.  By the way I did give in and purchased Windows 7 64 bit Ultimate... however I may still partition the hard drive to run both.  Use Windows for gaming and Ubuntu for everything else.

    image

  • DekronDekron Member UncommonPosts: 7,358

    Originally posted by JohnnyMotrin

    No this isn't my first build, rather the first time thinking about installing Linux Ubuntu.  Why Isn't Linux a very good OS as a general desktop?  Ubuntu is suppose to be the most stable and easy to use OS for a pc.  By the way I did give in and purchased Windows 7 64 bit Ultimate... however I may still partition the hard drive to run both.  Use Windows for gaming and Ubuntu for everything else.

    Linux is a very stable desktop. I would like to see the above poster's argument detailing why it is not. It does have a steep learning curve which is my guess why the above poster claims it is not suitable. He probably failed to grasp an understanding of the Linux environment.

    The way I go, however, is not using Linux as my main environment. If you wish to drop the coin on Windows, you can still use Linux in full force by installing on a virtual machine (use VirtualBox). It is fairly simple to set up the environment and will give you the opportunity to learn Linux (I recommend SuSe over Ubuntu, but that is just personal opinion) while maintaining an OS you already know.

  • ScrimMalteseScrimMaltese Member Posts: 469

    Originally posted by Dekron

    Originally posted by JohnnyMotrin

    No this isn't my first build, rather the first time thinking about installing Linux Ubuntu.  Why Isn't Linux a very good OS as a general desktop?  Ubuntu is suppose to be the most stable and easy to use OS for a pc.  By the way I did give in and purchased Windows 7 64 bit Ultimate... however I may still partition the hard drive to run both.  Use Windows for gaming and Ubuntu for everything else.

    Linux is a very stable desktop. I would like to see the above poster's argument detailing why it is not. It does have a steep learning curve which is my guess why the above poster claims it is not suitable. He probably failed to grasp an understanding of the Linux environment.

    The way I go, however, is not using Linux as my main environment. If you wish to drop the coin on Windows, you can still use Linux in full force by installing on a virtual machine (use VirtualBox). It is fairly simple to set up the environment and will give you the opportunity to learn Linux (I recommend SuSe over Ubuntu, but that is just personal opinion) while maintaining an OS you already know.

    I work in a Linux Environment every day, but I still don't use it at home because there is simply no point in using it at home. Saying that I fail to grasp the concept is quite ignorant and over generalizing. I was talking about a "main environment" which is why I said "general desktop", which is the same thing. Instead you feel a need to try an insult another poster, then go on to say the exact same thing later on in your post. I find that kinda sad. You see, I could come to a fairly long list of conclusions about you recommending Suse over Ubuntu, to someoene who has no prior knowledge of Linux. But, I'm not the one pointing fingers here, so I'm not going to do that.

    If all you want to do is surf the web and use instant messengers, then Linux is far better than Windows, especially for those who have virtually no understanding of it, because almost can't screw it up. But, if you want to do anything else, you're better off using Windows. The Software is better, the environment is better, the drivers are better, and virtually anyting you want to use a general desktop for is done better by applications produced by corporations with teams that have a dedicated focus, not open source. Quite often, you run into small programs and drivers that you may need, that don't exactly have proper support for installation (or uninstallation) on linux, and even for someone who knows what they are doing, they can be a waste of time and overly complicated compared to point click install on a Windows machine.

    Using Windows for games and using Linux "for everything else" is just a pain. If you want to reboot your system every time you stop playing a game and want to surf the web, then so be it. (I'm not even going to mention Wine here) There's absolutely no point in it, but if that's what suits your fancy then go right ahead. Windows is far more useful if you do any sort of work in Office programs, because Open Office is a piece of junk as well as virtually any other general use program for Linux. The only programs I like from the Linux environment, I use on my Windows machine just as easily, because even though they are open source, they have proper support and have clients designed for Windows as well as Linux. Pidgin (GAIM) being one of a few. Of course, that is not to say that all open source programs for Linux that have Windows clients are good. It's simply that, generally if a program is good, it also has a Windows client.

  • JayBirdzJayBirdz Member Posts: 1,017

    Eve? Thought CCP was dropping support for Linux. Did they change their mind?

  • DekronDekron Member UncommonPosts: 7,358

    Originally posted by ScrimMaltese

    Originally posted by Dekron


    Originally posted by JohnnyMotrin

    No this isn't my first build, rather the first time thinking about installing Linux Ubuntu.  Why Isn't Linux a very good OS as a general desktop?  Ubuntu is suppose to be the most stable and easy to use OS for a pc.  By the way I did give in and purchased Windows 7 64 bit Ultimate... however I may still partition the hard drive to run both.  Use Windows for gaming and Ubuntu for everything else.

    Linux is a very stable desktop. I would like to see the above poster's argument detailing why it is not. It does have a steep learning curve which is my guess why the above poster claims it is not suitable. He probably failed to grasp an understanding of the Linux environment.

    The way I go, however, is not using Linux as my main environment. If you wish to drop the coin on Windows, you can still use Linux in full force by installing on a virtual machine (use VirtualBox). It is fairly simple to set up the environment and will give you the opportunity to learn Linux (I recommend SuSe over Ubuntu, but that is just personal opinion) while maintaining an OS you already know.

    I work in a Linux Environment every day, but I still don't use it at home because there is simply no point in using it at home. Saying that I fail to grasp the concept is quite ignorant and over generalizing. I was talking about a "main environment" which is why I said "general desktop", which is the same thing. Instead you feel a need to try an insult another poster, then go on to say the exact same thing later on in your post. I find that kinda sad. You see, I could come to a fairly long list of conclusions about you recommending Suse over Ubuntu, to someoene who has no prior knowledge of Linux. But, I'm not the one pointing fingers here, so I'm not going to do that.

    QQ more.

    I wasn't insulting. Your generalization without any reason is why I stated what I did.

    My reasoning for using VirtualBox as a Linux environment is because I built a gaming rig, not a workstation/general desktop. There are plenty of games for Linux, but I didn't spend 3k for a Linux box. With that said, I do switch over to Linux for everything other than gaming.

    I use SuSe because it is a preference. One reason is in Ubuntu, at least the last version I used (Jaunty Jackalope), you could not use a true root. Ubuntu was created with a more user-friendly environment in mind. To each his own - I'm not going to participate in a Ubunutu vs SuSe argument. They are overdone and end with no result.

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