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Nostalgia Goggles

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  • DoktorTeufelDoktorTeufel Member UncommonPosts: 413

    "Take off your nostalgia goggles" is such a crap argument. I hate it, I hate the fact that people use it so often in regard to computer games... and yet, there is some merit to it, I must admit.


    For example, scientific studies have shown that human being's musical tastes "crystallize" not long after their teenage years. I'm 27 years old, so I enjoy listening to alternative rock bands such as Bush, Nirvana, Stone Temple Pilots, Soundgarden, and other bands from my own formative years.


    I'm not a fan of modern alternative music, however. It sounds girly to me, "pussified" if you will, and I just find it completely unappealing. By the same token, someone like Negentropy may enjoy Pink Floyd, Grateful Dead, and Alice Cooper, but not Bush or Nirvana.


    (I actually like those three older bands, too, and I don't hate ALL modern music, which proves that there are exceptions to the rule.)


    So:


    Older gamers have a "crystallized" idea of which computer and video games they like to play. Since old-school games become increasingly rare as the years march on, old-school gamers become irritated and bitter. Because they like the older games better, they begin to think of the newer games as being inferior.


    Personally, the late 1980s, 1990s, and very early 2000s are what I consider to be the "golden years" of computer gaming. That age is now dead.


    It's not just "nostalgia goggles" or "you've changed over the years." I played Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri for the very first time a few years ago (a game from the 1990s), and I LOVED it. I can't have nostalgia for a game I've never played, can I?


    Of course not. My actual nostalgia is for the game design philosophies and gameplay of those older games, not just memories of my teenage years connected to a certain game or whatever.


    They really don't make them like they used to, unfortunately. I buy only a few computer games per year nowadays, and by 2020, I'll most likely have stopped gaming altogether. Only books and board games retain that classic feeling decade after decade, I've found.

    Currently Playing: EVE Online
    Retired From: UO, FFXI, AO, SWG, Ryzom, GW, WoW, WAR

  • pojungpojung Member Posts: 810

    Originally posted by DoktorTeufel

     

    "Take off your nostalgia goggles" is such a crap argument. I hate it, I hate the fact that people use it so often in regard to computer games... and yet, there is some merit to it, I must admit.

    There can be, in the cases that it is true. What remains to be proven, and nigh everyone who uses the argument, is which cases those are. Hint: more often than not it's used as a discussion-ender whereby they have no more logical ammunition, so they resort to using inflammatory remarks that can't be proven, or disproven.

    For example, scientific studies have shown that human being's musical tastes "crystallize" not long after their teenage years. I'm 27 years old, so I enjoy listening to alternative rock bands such as Bush, Nirvana, Stone Temple Pilots, Soundgarden, and other bands from my own formative years.

    Close. It's 25. It's linked to the end of development of the prefrontal cortex, which governs reason and decision-making. It's not just music.

    I'm not a fan of modern alternative music, however. It sounds girly to me, "pussified" if you will, and I just find it completely unappealing. By the same token, someone like Negentropy may enjoy Pink Floyd, Grateful Dead, and Alice Cooper, but not Bush or Nirvana.

    (I actually like those three older bands, too, and I don't hate ALL modern music, which proves that there are exceptions to the rule.)

    'Exceptions' to what 'rule'? 'Alternative' or 'modern' are nothing more than categories used to bundle many different styles and tastes into an easily identifiable label. Bite-size recognition for the brain.

    So:

    Older gamers have a "crystallized" idea of which computer and video games they like to play. Since old-school games become increasingly rare as the years march on, old-school gamers become irritated and bitter. Because they like the older games better, they begin to think of the newer games as being inferior.

    Logical fallacy. While desires and wants become more or less cemented, they can still continue to evolve. Additionally, left of an abundance does not make anyone 'irritated and bitter' out of sheer cause:effect. There are elements that anyone with experience in any field can point out as being flaws with any recent crop of products. No game is perfect, and an average 'aged' gamer who is able to identify elements of 'current' games that he doesn't like because he labels them as inferior deserves more merit, not less, considering the amount of games, the experience, they have played. But this is no different than an 'aged' gamer picking up an 'aged' game and identifying those same elements. The disconnect is that 'new' gamers identify the 'old' gamer' and 'new' game and come up with a nice, convenient, reasoning for why their tastes 'need' to be defended.

    Personally, the late 1980s, 1990s, and very early 2000s are what I consider to be the "golden years" of computer gaming. That age is now dead.

    It's not just "nostalgia goggles" or "you've changed over the years." I played Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri for the very first time a few years ago (a game from the 1990s), and I LOVED it. I can't have nostalgia for a game I've never played, can I?

    The funny thing is, these are mutually exclusive. You DON'T change over the years after the age of 25 (or very little). And yet people toss them around not realizing their lack of correlation.

    Of course not. My actual nostalgia is for the game design philosophies and gameplay of those older games, not just memories of my teenage years connected to a certain game or whatever.

    They really don't make them like they used to, unfortunately. I buy only a few computer games per year nowadays, and by 2020, I'll most likely have stopped gaming altogether. Only books and board games retain that classic feeling decade after decade, I've found.

    Books and board games are not the cutting edge of profit gathering. The cost of a book or a board game remains very stable, or dropping, considering inflation. Whenever quality and profit share the same stage, only one can be in the limelight. Thankfully, some mediums don't have two characters battling for the primary role.

    That is exactly right, and we're not saying NO to save WoW, because it is already a lost cause. We are saying NO to dissuade the next group of greedy suits who decide to emulate Blizzard and Cryptic, etc.
    We can prevent some of the future games from spewing this crap, but the sooner we start saying no, the better the results will be.
    So - Stand up, pull up your pants, and walk away.
    - MMO_Doubter

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