GeezerGamer

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  • World of Warcraft - Five Things Blizzard Needs to Leave Behind in Legion - MMORPG.com

    I loved WoW. But the expansions, after 2.x, one after another just kept diminishing my experience. I did enjoy Wrath, but thought TBC was better, Cata was just bad. MOP was playable, but not great, I bought WoD and got to 92 when I logged off and never went back. If they can bring the overall experience back to circa 2004-2010, I'd come back. Otherwise, GG Bliz.
    Torvalmurph0613SedrynTyrosPhloomborghive49infomatzdeniter
  • Is Destiny 2 an MMO:Poll

    There's no real debate here.  There are two sides to this; the people who recognize what a MMO is and the people who don't.  The people who don't may classify Destiny 2 as a MMO and they may also decide that Chicken is Sea Food, but either way they're fucking wrong.
    I personally don't give a shit....really I don't...... But I am bored so.......

    Grammatically, it's not an MMORPG.

    Massive(LY) (adv) - Multiplayer
    Multiplayer (adj) - game
    Online (adj) - game
    Role (adj) Technically, this should be hyphenated with "playing" to form a compound adj.
    Playing see previous
    Game (N) and the subject

    This is means it turns the word Massive from  an adjective into an Adverb. This means it CANNOT be used to describe the word "game" in this context. It's a Adverb so it can only be used to describe an adjective or a verb.

    The context has it describing Multiplayer. So, it's not Game that is massively. It's not Online that is massively.....the statement is saying that Mutiplayer is what is massively. Meaning the amount of players online together at the same time.


    That being said......If that's how it's being described, then WTF do I care. If people want to speak incorrectly, they should at least be aware of The English Language's rules, instead of carrying on in ignorance.

    And yes, I admit, this is a reverse troll post.....I think......not sure.

    In any event, the definition is not subjective.
    jmcdermottukExcessionGdemami
  • Fallout 4 PC beta patch today, 2.1 GB

    My only hope is that they pay very close attention to the mistakes made when they tried paid modding in Skyrim (2011 edition)

    The modding community is a pool. You freely contribute, you freely take if it. Most of the really good mods are not single projects but are compilations built upon works by previous modders.

    The whole issue around paid modding in Skyrim came about when 2 very prominent modders came to blows.

    Fore, created FNIS, Fores New Idles in Skyrim. Just about every mod that uses non vanilla or custom animations uses resources created by Fore. He is also very much against Paid-for modding and will not allow his work to be used in that capacity.......That means no profitable mods can have custom animations.....No one else has made a mod that can replace FNIS yet.

    Then there was Chesko. Another prominent modder who made some very well known mods for Skyrim. His mod "Art of the Catch" was at the epicenter of the controversy. He'd used some of Fore's resources in his mod that he charged money for on Steam. He did this with a couple other mods too. He used Apachii hair resources in his Arissa mod.

    Needless to say the authors of the these mods went through the roof. Given how embedded and how deep the concept of shared knowledge went. There was almost no way to separate out who's work is who's. Until the original authors come forward and say "Hey, that's mine, you can use that to make money" Steam had no choice but to pull the plug on it.

    This brought to light one huge factor in all this. Modding is built on modding. Paid-for mods will subvert this at a foundational level.

    Mods will no longer be built off a pool of knowledge open to a community but will become siloed sourses of knowlege to be protected.

    I don't see this as a good thing.


    Yeah, that was one of the biggest problems with the steam paid mods was modders pretty much re-uploading the same mod (and removing the free version in many cases) AND using assets from other mods. This does get around that problem, but in the end its still copies of nexus mods from whats in the creation club so far.

    Paid mods could very well be good though. Imagine a team of modders making something like Beyond Skyrim: Cyrodiil. I'd pay a lot of money for that alone. Or something smaller, maybe a hearthfire (Skyrim) or contraptions DLC (Fallout 4) or an automatron sized DLC (Fallout 4)

    Modders make very very little donations on Nexus. SkyUI creator said over the years he only earned 30 dollars for his work on SkyUI and that is the most popular and biggest mod for Skyrim.

    I do think they should get rewarded for the effort they put in. I however wouldn't pay for reskins. But I'd pay (and did donate) for SkyUI because he deserved it and its an essential mod. 5 dollar donation is very little in the grand scheme of things, but more than he usually gets. 

    However, I'm not sure if there'll ever be DLC sized mods. Someone pointed out on Reddit...how would they pay for all the voice actors and a whole mod team? Would they pay the creator of the mod or everyone involved? 

    There is also a very small limit on what can be uploaded on creation club (forgot the mod size limit off top of my head, but there is another limit too with how much can be changed). Maybe because of PS4/Xbox they can't allow huge mods to take over...but that would then make the creation club junk.

     I'd definitely pay like I said for DLC quality content. Also, Hearthfire was 5 dollars, and some of the paid mods are nearly that price...that power armor is not Hearthfire quality 5 dollars lol
    I am not against authors receiving compensation for their work. If they made it, they have that right.

    But what I see now, is that Skyrim (2011) will be the pinnacle of modding and we will probably never see a repeat again.

    This is my prediction, and I say this because if there is a community for mods for money, and there is a community for non paid mods, it will be divided and the shared knowledge will be lessened.

    As I said, I don't see this as good for modding. And the worst part of this is going to be that the modders themselves will make shit for money. But it is what it is.

    As for the gamers......I love to play with modded skyrim. I've tried hundreds and hundreds of different mods. I'll play through, delete all my saves, gather up a whole new theme of mods and play another round that is completely different than the last. Well, I'm certainly not going to drop money on hundreds and hundreds of mods, so for me, those days may also be over.
    bartoni33
  • Fallout 4 PC beta patch today, 2.1 GB

    My only hope is that they pay very close attention to the mistakes made when they tried paid modding in Skyrim (2011 edition)

    The modding community is a pool. You freely contribute, you freely take if it. Most of the really good mods are not single projects but are compilations built upon works by previous modders.

    The whole issue around paid modding in Skyrim came about when 2 very prominent modders came to blows.

    Fore, created FNIS, Fores New Idles in Skyrim. Just about every mod that uses non vanilla or custom animations uses resources created by Fore. He is also very much against Paid-for modding and will not allow his work to be used in that capacity.......That means no profitable mods can have custom animations.....No one else has made a mod that can replace FNIS yet.

    Then there was Chesko. Another prominent modder who made some very well known mods for Skyrim. His mod "Art of the Catch" was at the epicenter of the controversy. He'd used some of Fore's resources in his mod that he charged money for on Steam. He did this with a couple other mods too. He used Apachii hair resources in his Arissa mod.

    Needless to say the authors of the these mods went through the roof. Given how embedded and how deep the concept of shared knowledge went. There was almost no way to separate out who's work is who's. Until the original authors come forward and say "Hey, that's mine, you can use that to make money" Steam had no choice but to pull the plug on it.

    This brought to light one huge factor in all this. Modding is built on modding. Paid-for mods will subvert this at a foundational level.

    Mods will no longer be built off a pool of knowledge open to a community but will become siloed sourses of knowlege to be protected.

    I don't see this as a good thing.


    TheScavengerBuccaneerbartoni33
  • Why people now hate early access:

    DMKano said:
    The real issue OP - vast majority of those listed are very poor games or in very poor/unfinished state.

    That's why people hate them, the games are just not good.


    If the game kicks ass and it's in early access - people would flock to it and love it regardless.


    Before kickstarter - alpha games died in alpha state before the public even knew they existed - and yes vast majority of those sucked too.

    So nothing changed - most games in alpha/early concept stages are NOT GOING TO SURVIVE to launch, that's the reality of game development - this is how it was before kickstarter and early access.

    What early access/kickstarter did - is simply expose how few game concepts/alphas are actually worthy of launch, the reality didn't change.



    Bottom line - out of 100 game concepts - less than 10 will pan out and only about 2 of those will turn out pretty decent.


    No. What changed is that now, players are paying for this shit, and developers now look at their potential player base, not as something to make and keep satisfied, but something to exploit.
    DeVoDeVo