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New Gaming PC Build/Hardware choice

Hi there

I need a new powerfull computer for the upcomings games in the future but also for some advanced 3D programes and calculations when I am working home sometime.

I need a quick critical view on these specs.


CPU: Intel Core i7-4770 - 3.4 GHz (4 core - 8 thread) - Haswell  (Memory Types     DDR3-1333/1600)
CPU Cooler :Noctua NH-U12P SE2 - low noise (20 dBa) -l Ivy Bridge & Haswell           
Motherboard: Asus Z87-K C2 - Haswell (4 x DIMM, Max. 32GB, DDR3 2933(O.C.)/2800(O.C.)/2666(O.C.)/2600(O.C.)/2400(O.C.)/2200(O.C.)/2133(O.C.)/2000(O.C.)/1866(O.C.)/1600/1333 MHz)
RAM: Kingston HyperX Genesis Dual Channel DDR3-1600 - 16GB (2x8GB)             
Graphic: Asus GeForce GTX 760 OC - 2GB GDDR5                       
Disk 1: Intel 335 SSD Series - 180GB (Retail)                            
Disk 2: Western Digital WD Black - 1TB                            
Drive: Plextor PX-891SA Black - DVD Burner
House: Fractal Design Define R4 - low noise - Black Pearl               
PSU: Corsair RM650 (Modulær) - 80plus Gold - 650W PSU     

Core i7-4770  is best with 1600 and the motherboard also support it. So therefore it picked  DDR3-1600.

http://ark.intel.com/products/75122/Intel-Core-i7-4770-Processor-8M-Cache-up-to-3_90-GHz

https://www.asus.com/Motherboards/Z87K/#specifications

Comments

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,765Member Uncommon
    A lot depends on what you're going to do with it.  If you need it for demanding things other than gaming, it would be good to know what "advanced 3D programes and calculations" you have in mind.  On the CPU side, do you need it for programs that scale well to many CPU cores?  On the GPU side, do you need a professional graphics card, or do you care about integer performance or double-precision floating point performance?
  • grndzrogrndzro Reno, NVPosts: 1,150Member
    Yea kinda hard to critique when we have no idea of the non gaming workload. Budget would also help.
  • jdnewelljdnewell Spring Hill, TNPosts: 2,150Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by grndzro
    Yea kinda hard to critique when we have no idea of the non gaming workload. Budget would also help.

    Indeed.

    Overall the components look solid, and would make a solid PC either way.  But knowing the work vs gaming needs would yield better advice.

  • grndzrogrndzro Reno, NVPosts: 1,150Member

    On another note it looks like everyone is going to go bonkers over Star Citizen and it is indeed looking to be an absolutely incredible experience. And it is Mantle.

    It could be that a smarter build might be a high end Kaveri setup with DDR3-2800, and a higher end GCN card. Overclocked to 5ghz should be plenty for any newer title. And with Mantle looking to take off it will outperform Intel 4770K in a large number of next gen titles.

    Processor and Mobo would be less expensive and allow you to get AMD R9-280X which is down to 399$ now.

    I wouldn't bet against Mantle. Support is shaping up to be very strong.

  • sacredfoolsacredfool prague, TXPosts: 760Member Uncommon

    If you can get the 760 cheap then I think it's a fine setup. 

    In a bit (when you see you can't run games smoothly) you'll need to upgrade the GPU though.


    Originally posted by nethaniah

    Seriously Farmville? Yeah I think it's great. In a World where half our population is dying of hunger the more fortunate half is spending their time harvesting food that doesn't exist.


  • BloodDualityBloodDuality Niagara, WIPosts: 404Member

    Looks pretty good to me. In a way looks like an updated version of my curren comp. I would recomend EVGA for the video card manufacturer. They tend to have some oft he best reviews on quality. I love my GTX 680 Classified from them. Still playing every game I have thrown at it on ultra setting with every single thing maxed. 

    good luck with the build. 

  • Thanks for the answer so far and sorry about the delay. I just work too much...

    I wanna be able to play the big games like Titanfall, Star Citizen and Witcher 3, also games like Elder Scrolls Online.

    My budget for a new PC is around 2000-2500 US Dollars. But I also need get a console later this year and also have som minor repairs on my car.

    I use Autodesk Inventor 3D CAD and PRO/Engineer at work and sometime also at home. But they run very slow in 3D space. My calculations program is FEM Design and I can really feed it a lot of input sometime. Then it also run at a very slow speed.

  • jdnewelljdnewell Spring Hill, TNPosts: 2,150Member Uncommon

    With a budget like that and with the work you do why not throw a top end GPU in the system.? Something like  a 290x

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127773

    or a 280x if you dont want to spend quite that much.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127759

     

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,765Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Battlekruse

    Thanks for the answer so far and sorry about the delay. I just work too much...

    I wanna be able to play the big games like Titanfall, Star Citizen and Witcher 3, also games like Elder Scrolls Online.

    My budget for a new PC is around 2000-2500 US Dollars. But I also need get a console later this year and also have som minor repairs on my car.

    I use Autodesk Inventor 3D CAD and PRO/Engineer at work and sometime also at home. But they run very slow in 3D space. My calculations program is FEM Design and I can really feed it a lot of input sometime. Then it also run at a very slow speed.

    I had a look at the Autodesk Inventor system requirements:

    http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/ps/dl/item?siteID=123112&id=15402497&linkID=9242018

    They recommend a Xeon E3 or Core i7 processor, which is fairly high end.  But for the video card, they just want DirectX 11 compatibility, which means that the video card needs to be recent, but potentially low end.  And there's no mention of professional graphics cards.  That tells me that they're doing the heavy computations on the CPU rather than the GPU, which may be appropriate if they're trying to make many objects interact in complex ways as opposed to trying to draw a large number of simple things quickly, as games do.

    Thus, you're likely to see real benefits from getting the strongest CPU that you can, and might want to think about an Ivy Bridge-E system:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116939

    The cores are only slightly slower than those of the Haswell system you were looking at--and that difference can be made up by overclocking, even if you compare it to an overclocked Haswell system.  Meanwhile, you get 6 cores instead of 4, which translates to a huge performance increase.  Trying to make many parts interact in complex ways isn't GPU-friendly, but it is likely to be the sort of thing that is basically trivial to scale to as many cores as you can fit into a single CPU.

    FEM design meanwhile recommends quad core processors, even listing an AMD Phenom as a recommended option.  That was a terrible processor for most purposes, and its only redeeming quality was that it had four cores in a single die.  If that's what they're recommending, then they'll presumably make good use out of as many CPU cores as you can give them.

    If you do get an Ivy Bridge-E system, you need an LGA 2011 motherboard.  You also want four memory modules, to fill all four memory channels--likely with a 4 GB module in each.  But the rest of the system can be whatever.

    -----

    Are you looking to buy a computer built by someone else, or to build your own?  The latter will save you hundreds of dollars.

  • grndzrogrndzro Reno, NVPosts: 1,150Member

    Yea I was thinking of building out Ivy-E for him.

    But then my brain said that is an absurd amount of money for only a bit more performance. And then I figured the budget he wanted was somewhere around 1500. Toss in a 400$ video card and for the best performance you are looking at OC AMD 8350.

    For high end Intel you should allocate a solid $2K. Not $2500 - Console and auto repairs.

    Autodesk is AMD optimized.

  • I am very interested in the Ivy Bridge-E system.

    FEM design calculations  is a time consuming task for me and I loss sometimes precious time at work due to that.

    So basis I just need to swap motherboard to the ASUS LGA 2011 and fill up the board with 4x4GB of RAM to get the maximum out of the current setting`?.

    I will most likely buildt it myself with a couple of friends in a weekend (free pizza and cola for them, hehe).
  • docminus2docminus2 StockholmPosts: 158Member Common

    You can't do much wrong with your build.

    I'd get a different Graphics card though. 280X or even 290X if you want to put in that money.

    Also, the PSU is overkill for that system as it is. But it never hurts if you want to expand in the future.

    EDIT: My experience with CPU is that it usually is bored in games. I have an old i7 4 core/8threads and it never goes over 10-20%. Graphics on the other hand... 2

    --------------------------------------------
    Youtube newb:

  • GillleanGilllean NewYork, ALPosts: 169Member

    GPU is bad very bad

    ALSO SDD won't improve you're gaming experience. It  will affect game loading screen or Windows start up with 30 sec faster maybe. Is it worth ?

    If I where you I would remove SDD from list and would buy a GTX 780 instead

    By the way I bought GTX 760 OC not very happy with it looking forward to buy something better.  

     

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,765Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Battlekruse
    I am very interested in the Ivy Bridge-E system.

    FEM design calculations  is a time consuming task for me and I loss sometimes precious time at work due to that.

    So basis I just need to swap motherboard to the ASUS LGA 2011 and fill up the board with 4x4GB of RAM to get the maximum out of the current setting`?.

    I will most likely buildt it myself with a couple of friends in a weekend (free pizza and cola for them, hehe).

    One thing that you can do to make sure that it scales to many CPU cores is when you're using FEM at work, open Task Manager, look at the performance tab, and see if it's using all of the CPU cores you've got or just one.  If you use Linux at work rather than Windows, you can use the "top" command to show basically the same information.

    -----

    I'm going to assume that your budget does not require room for peripherals such as a monitor or keyboard.  In that case, here you go:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116939

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835220060

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131855

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231315

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820148694

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822236339

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811147107

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151118

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827135204

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125471

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832416776

    Total:  $1977, including shipping and before rebates

    ----

    We've already been over Haswell versus Ivy Bridge-E, so I won't rehash that here.

    The video card I picked there will typically be maybe 70% faster than the one you picked.  You've got the budget, so you might as well get a high end card.  Prices on AMD's high end cards are a little ridiculous right now because the currency miners (e.g., bitcoin) are buying them up at above MSRP because AMD cares about GPU integer performance and Nvidia doesn't.  So you get an Nvidia card.

    I'm not sure what you were planning on paying for a 180 GB Intel SSD, but unless it's a lot cheaper than the Crucial M5 I linked, I wouldn't.  The latter is a better drive, and likely to also be cheaper.  But if you've got a big SSD, then everything where speed matters goes on the SSD, and hard drive performance doesn't matter.  So you can get a cheaper hard drive.

    For the case, I tried to pick something that is a good deal today.  If you love the Fractal Design R4, then have at it.  But do be aware that it only comes with two case fans, though it does have room for you to buy and add more.

    The power supply I linked is better, and likely also cheaper than the Corsair RM650.

    Optical drives are a commodity, so you get whatever is cheapest that day.

    Unless you're going to run Linux, you need an OS license.  If you have a strong preference for Windows 7, you can get that instead of 8.1.

  • GruntyGrunty Fort Worth, TXPosts: 7,029Member Uncommon

    I've got a Fractal Design Core3000 case which is similar in size and layout. The case works well and is a clean design. The Core 3000 doesn't come with the front door covering the drive bays and vent.

    I've got 2 niggling issues with the case. The power button's blue LED is way too bright. It'll light up a small bedroom or large cubicle at night. Don't put this case in a room where someone sleeps. In a dark room it's bright enough to hurt if you look at it straight on. The ceiling will glow blue.

    The other is related to the drive bays and is to me more important. They are cheap stamped metal. Better than the bottom dollar cases but definitely not top of the line. Under heavy use the sound of hard disk drive read/write head activity is amplified by these bays vibrating. 

    The drive bays in your listed case are the same. The provided fans are quiet enough.

  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAPosts: 4,164Member Uncommon


    Originally posted by Gilllean
    ALSO SDD won't improve you're gaming experience. It  will affect game loading screen or Windows start up with 30 sec faster maybe. Is it worth ?

    Absolutely affects the gaming experience, just not Frames per Second (which is just one part of the gaming experience). In my opinion, it's absolutely worth it.

    http://www.reddit.com/r/ffxiv/comments/1py1no/

    Here is a reddit user who replaced his PS3 internal HD with an SSD - so this is entirely about the "gaming experience" and the difference in just HDD vs SSD. I'd say he's happy with it.

    http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/digitalfoundry-can-ssd-upgrades-boost-ps3-performance

    Here's an article where they benchmark a few PS3 titles, with the defualt HDD and an upgraded SSD. They found some games greatly benefit - particularly those games that stream textures, and others only the loading benefit between maps or levels.

    So... to say it doesn't effect the gaming experience is flat wrong - it absolutely does. You could say it doesn't affect FPS, which would be accurate, but that's just one part of the picture.

    I won't build a computer without an SSD any more, even if that means saving money on the CPU/GPU to get it. They are, in my opinion, the biggest advancement in computer usability/performance in the past 10 years and anyone not considering one obviously hasn't used one extensively to know the difference.

  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAPosts: 4,164Member Uncommon



    PSU: Corsair RM650 (Modular)

    You should be aware the latest Corsair power supplies aren't nearly as good as their older ones. This RM model in particular failed HardOCP testing not too long ago, which is the first Corsair model in my memory to do so. It had some significant problems other than just voltage response.

    http://www.hardocp.com/article/2013/11/13/corsair_rm750_750w_power_supply_review/9

  • Hi all

    Thanks for all you answer and you support.

    I decide to swap a few things for my new computer, both the graphic card and the RAM. I about to install Windows on it soon and I really happy for it. Its almost soundlless and you cant hear it due to background noise in the house.

    Now I cant wait to test it with my calculations programes and building 3D models again. Also to try out some new games in the high end come out.

     

    This is the end result:


    CPU: Intel Core i7-4770 - 3.4 GHz (4 core - 8 thread) - Haswell  (Memory Types     DDR3-1333/1600)
    CPU Cooler :Noctua NH-U12P SE2 - low noise (20 dBa) -l Ivy Bridge & Haswell           
    Motherboard: Asus Z87-K C2 - Haswell (4 x DIMM, Max. 32GB, DDR3 2933(O.C.)/2800(O.C.)/2666(O.C.)/2600(O.C.)/2400(O.C.)/2200(O.C.)/2133(O.C.)/2000(O.C.)/1866(O.C.)/1600/1333 MHz)
    RAM: Kingston HyperX Genesis Quad Channel DDR3-1600 - 16GB (4x4GB)      
    Graphic: Asus GeForce GTX 770 Overclocked - 2 GB GDDR5                    
    Disk 1: Intel 335 SSD Series - 180GB (Retail)                            
    Disk 2: Western Digital WD Black - 1TB                            
    Drive: Plextor PX-891SA Black - DVD Burner
    House: Fractal Design Define R4 - low noise - Black Pearl               
    PSU: Corsair RM650 (Modulær) - 80plus Gold - 650W PSU

     

     

  • QuizzicalQuizzical Posts: 14,765Member Uncommon
    If you're getting a CPU with only two memory channels, then it's better to get two 8 GB memory modules rather than four 4 GB modules.  It's only if the CPU has four memory channels that four modules are better.  A DDR3 memory controller can have a single 64-bit connection to one module or two 32-bit connections to two separate modules.  You get the same bandwidth either way, but the latter puts more stress on the system and costs more to buy the memory.
  • Flyte27Flyte27 Greenwich, CTPosts: 2,837Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by BloodDuality

    Looks pretty good to me. In a way looks like an updated version of my curren comp. I would recomend EVGA for the video card manufacturer. They tend to have some oft he best reviews on quality. I love my GTX 680 Classified from them. Still playing every game I have thrown at it on ultra setting with every single thing maxed. 

    good luck with the build. 

    I've had video cards from EVGA, Gigabyte, and ASUS.  So far I like ASUS the best.  EVGA cards usually all have this tiny fan on the back the makes a lot of noise.  The Gigabyte, MSI, and ASUS coolers all use larger/quieter fans.  If you look at the benchmarks the ASUS is very good at noise level, power consumption, and performance.  EVGA is good at performance, but falls behind in other categories.

  • Flyte27Flyte27 Greenwich, CTPosts: 2,837Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Ridelynn

     


    Originally posted by Gilllean
    ALSO SDD won't improve you're gaming experience. It  will affect game loading screen or Windows start up with 30 sec faster maybe. Is it worth ?

     

    Absolutely affects the gaming experience, just not Frames per Second (which is just one part of the gaming experience). In my opinion, it's absolutely worth it.

    http://www.reddit.com/r/ffxiv/comments/1py1no/

    Here is a reddit user who replaced his PS3 internal HD with an SSD - so this is entirely about the "gaming experience" and the difference in just HDD vs SSD. I'd say he's happy with it.

    http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/digitalfoundry-can-ssd-upgrades-boost-ps3-performance

    Here's an article where they benchmark a few PS3 titles, with the defualt HDD and an upgraded SSD. They found some games greatly benefit - particularly those games that stream textures, and others only the loading benefit between maps or levels.

    So... to say it doesn't effect the gaming experience is flat wrong - it absolutely does. You could say it doesn't affect FPS, which would be accurate, but that's just one part of the picture.

    I won't build a computer without an SSD any more, even if that means saving money on the CPU/GPU to get it. They are, in my opinion, the biggest advancement in computer usability/performance in the past 10 years and anyone not considering one obviously hasn't used one extensively to know the difference.

    SSDs are good for more then just the boost to load time in games.  They waste less power, less heat generation, don't break as easy (no mechanical parts), and make no noise.

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