Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Fuzzy Avatars Solved! Please re-upload your avatar if it was fuzzy!

Sounds in Space

2»

Comments

  • MattatronMattatron Dunlap, ILPosts: 226Member
    Originally posted by AlBQuirky

     


    Originally posted by denshing

    Originally posted by psiic
    Gravity and Vaccum effect fire in odd ways.

    Then why is the sun on fire? Checkmate
    ummm... maybe because the sun is made of flammable gasses? It is not burning space, but rather the gasses that make up its substance. That would be similar to asking how does fire work on Earth, since the earth is in space? Space actually keeps the sun from burning everything else around it.

     

    Sun is in plasma state, not "on fire". Particles emitted from constant fusion reaction trail along electromagnetic waves, appearing "as fire". In fact, those particles are "burning space"; reacting with the sparse particles that constitute the "soup" (zoo?) in the "imperfect vacuum" of space, because those particles are space.

    Space is not a great insulator; only insomuch as particles are restricted the full velocity of the speed of light.

  • MattatronMattatron Dunlap, ILPosts: 226Member
    Originally posted by xm522

    in space you would not get a physical shock-wave because there isn't anything physical between the explosion and you.

    This isn't true. There's plenty of something there, but it's all "spaced very far apart" compared to matter.

  • Butch808Butch808 sheffieldPosts: 319Member Uncommon
    Have you ever seen fire in space?
  • DamonVileDamonVile Vancouver, BCPosts: 4,818Member
    Originally posted by denshing
    Originally posted by psiic

     Gravity and Vaccum effect fire in odd ways.

    Then why is the sun on fire? Checkmate

    /facepalm

  • LittleBootLittleBoot roystonPosts: 326Member
    Without particles to vibrate within a vacuum there is no way to transmit sound.  However, within the atmosphere of a ship you would hear your own ship and sounds over the radio etc.  
  • MattatronMattatron Dunlap, ILPosts: 226Member
    Originally posted by LittleBoot
    Without particles to vibrate within a vacuum there is no way to transmit sound.  However, within the atmosphere of a ship you would hear your own ship and sounds over the radio etc.  

    Space is not a "perfect vacuum". There are innumerable particles from innumerable sources traveling in every vector, all the time.

  • LittleBootLittleBoot roystonPosts: 326Member
    Originally posted by Mattatron
    Originally posted by LittleBoot
    Without particles to vibrate within a vacuum there is no way to transmit sound.  However, within the atmosphere of a ship you would hear your own ship and sounds over the radio etc.  

    Space is not a "perfect vacuum". There are innumerable particles from innumerable sources traveling in every vector, all the time.

    But for the purposes of my point it is empty enough to prevent the transmission of sound- this is a gaming forum, not physics.  

  • MattatronMattatron Dunlap, ILPosts: 226Member
    Originally posted by LittleBoot
    Originally posted by Mattatron
    Originally posted by LittleBoot
    Without particles to vibrate within a vacuum there is no way to transmit sound.  However, within the atmosphere of a ship you would hear your own ship and sounds over the radio etc.  

    Space is not a "perfect vacuum". There are innumerable particles from innumerable sources traveling in every vector, all the time.

    But for the purposes of my point it is empty enough to prevent the transmission of sound- this is a gaming forum, not physics.  

    I suppose, if you were "in space" with only your "human parts" to observe the sudden expansion, you'd "hear" nothing because the mechanism "to hear" would be destroyed by the force.

  • LittleBootLittleBoot roystonPosts: 326Member
    Originally posted by Mattatron
    Originally posted by LittleBoot
    Originally posted by Mattatron
    Originally posted by LittleBoot
    Without particles to vibrate within a vacuum there is no way to transmit sound.  However, within the atmosphere of a ship you would hear your own ship and sounds over the radio etc.  

    Space is not a "perfect vacuum". There are innumerable particles from innumerable sources traveling in every vector, all the time.

    But for the purposes of my point it is empty enough to prevent the transmission of sound- this is a gaming forum, not physics.  

    I suppose, if you were "in space" with only your "human parts" to observe the sudden expansion, you'd "hear" nothing because the mechanism "to hear" would be destroyed by the force.

    I was thinking more that it would come across as very odd in the context of a game because you would hear all the noises your ship is making, the engines and guns etc, but the people shooting at you would do so in silence; and it would just feel like a bug in practice.  

    I'd also note the change in force is only 1 atmosphere (assuming explosive decompression hasn't occurred) which isn't that much; a couple of cosmonauts were accidently put into a vacuum in training- they crapped themselves and vomited copiously but suffered no other ill-effects.  Obviously you would suffocate; but that would be the way you died long before you froze/ exploded etc.   

  • VelocinoxVelocinox Old Folks Home, CAPosts: 812Member Uncommon

    Star Citizen IS using real sound physics. It is completely soundless in space.

     

    The pew pew and engine noises the other ships make is actually generated by your own ship inside your cockpit as a situational awareness warning system...

     

    ^_^

     

    'Sandbox MMO' is a PTSD trigger word for anyone who has the experience to know that anonymous players invariably use a 'sandbox' in the same manner a housecat does.


    When your head is stuck in the sand, your ass becomes the only recognizable part of you.


    No game is more fun than the one you can't play, and no game is more boring than one which you've become familiar.


    How to become a millionaire:
    Start with a billion dollars and make an MMO.

  • MattatronMattatron Dunlap, ILPosts: 226Member
    Originally posted by LittleBoot
    Originally posted by Mattatron
    Originally posted by LittleBoot
    Originally posted by Mattatron
    Originally posted by LittleBoot
    Without particles to vibrate within a vacuum there is no way to transmit sound.  However, within the atmosphere of a ship you would hear your own ship and sounds over the radio etc.  

    Space is not a "perfect vacuum". There are innumerable particles from innumerable sources traveling in every vector, all the time.

    But for the purposes of my point it is empty enough to prevent the transmission of sound- this is a gaming forum, not physics.  

    I suppose, if you were "in space" with only your "human parts" to observe the sudden expansion, you'd "hear" nothing because the mechanism "to hear" would be destroyed by the force.

    I was thinking more that it would come across as very odd in the context of a game because you would hear all the noises your ship is making, the engines and guns etc, but the people shooting at you would do so in silence; and it would just feel like a bug in practice.  

    I'd also note the change in force is only 1 atmosphere (and assuming explosive decompression hasn't occurred) which isn't that much; a couple of cosmonauts were accidently put into a vacuum in training- they crapped themselves and vomited copiously but suffered no other ill-effects.   

    I guess that depends on what's "exploding" or experiencing a sudden energy transformation. Any source of matter suddenly transforming to a state which is "not matter" emits particles in force, under E^2=(MC^2)^2+ (PC)^2. Yes, there are explosions in space, all the time.

    So if you just poked a hole in someone's hull, you're right, it's not going to amount to much. If you caused a sudden atomic reaction in a "fuel" substance for example, you wouldn't be worried about the sound, which would be the sudden expansion hitting the side of your ship's hull, smacking your ship like a bat hitting a baseball.

  • LittleBootLittleBoot roystonPosts: 326Member
    Originally posted by Mattatron
    Originally posted by LittleBoot
    Originally posted by Mattatron
    Originally posted by LittleBoot
    Originally posted by Mattatron
    Originally posted by LittleBoot
    Without particles to vibrate within a vacuum there is no way to transmit sound.  However, within the atmosphere of a ship you would hear your own ship and sounds over the radio etc.  

    Space is not a "perfect vacuum". There are innumerable particles from innumerable sources traveling in every vector, all the time.

    But for the purposes of my point it is empty enough to prevent the transmission of sound- this is a gaming forum, not physics.  

    I suppose, if you were "in space" with only your "human parts" to observe the sudden expansion, you'd "hear" nothing because the mechanism "to hear" would be destroyed by the force.

    I was thinking more that it would come across as very odd in the context of a game because you would hear all the noises your ship is making, the engines and guns etc, but the people shooting at you would do so in silence; and it would just feel like a bug in practice.  

    I'd also note the change in force is only 1 atmosphere (and assuming explosive decompression hasn't occurred) which isn't that much; a couple of cosmonauts were accidently put into a vacuum in training- they crapped themselves and vomited copiously but suffered no other ill-effects.   

    I guess that depends on what's "exploding" or experiencing a sudden energy transformation. Any source of matter suddenly transforming to a state which is "not matter" emits particles in force, under E^2=(MC^2)^2+ (PC)^2. Yes, there are explosions in space, all the time.

    So if you just poked a hole in someone's hull, you're right, it's not going to amount to much. If you caused a sudden atomic reaction in a "fuel" substance for example, you wouldn't be worried about the sound, which would be the sudden expansion hitting the side of your ship's hull, smacking your ship like a bat hitting a baseball.

    I thought we were talking about a human in space without a suit? 

  • MattatronMattatron Dunlap, ILPosts: 226Member
    Originally posted by LittleBoot
    Originally posted by Mattatron
    Originally posted by LittleBoot
    Originally posted by Mattatron
    Originally posted by LittleBoot
    Originally posted by Mattatron
    Originally posted by LittleBoot
    Without particles to vibrate within a vacuum there is no way to transmit sound.  However, within the atmosphere of a ship you would hear your own ship and sounds over the radio etc.  

    Space is not a "perfect vacuum". There are innumerable particles from innumerable sources traveling in every vector, all the time.

    But for the purposes of my point it is empty enough to prevent the transmission of sound- this is a gaming forum, not physics.  

    I suppose, if you were "in space" with only your "human parts" to observe the sudden expansion, you'd "hear" nothing because the mechanism "to hear" would be destroyed by the force.

    I was thinking more that it would come across as very odd in the context of a game because you would hear all the noises your ship is making, the engines and guns etc, but the people shooting at you would do so in silence; and it would just feel like a bug in practice.  

    I'd also note the change in force is only 1 atmosphere (and assuming explosive decompression hasn't occurred) which isn't that much; a couple of cosmonauts were accidently put into a vacuum in training- they crapped themselves and vomited copiously but suffered no other ill-effects.   

    I guess that depends on what's "exploding" or experiencing a sudden energy transformation. Any source of matter suddenly transforming to a state which is "not matter" emits particles in force, under E^2=(MC^2)^2+ (PC)^2. Yes, there are explosions in space, all the time.

    So if you just poked a hole in someone's hull, you're right, it's not going to amount to much. If you caused a sudden atomic reaction in a "fuel" substance for example, you wouldn't be worried about the sound, which would be the sudden expansion hitting the side of your ship's hull, smacking your ship like a bat hitting a baseball.

    I thought we were talking about a human in space without a suit? 

    Oh, that was humor, saying said force would enter your tympanic cavity and explode your head.

  • aRtFuLThinGaRtFuLThinG MelbournePosts: 1,134Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Tamanous
    Originally posted by denshing
    Originally posted by psiic

     Gravity and Vaccum effect fire in odd ways.

    Then why is the sun on fire? Checkmate

    Wow.

     

    How do you get through life?

     

     

    Through creationism I presume :P

  • LittleBootLittleBoot roystonPosts: 326Member
    Originally posted by aRtFuLThinG
    Originally posted by Tamanous
    Originally posted by denshing
    Originally posted by psiic

     Gravity and Vaccum effect fire in odd ways.

    Then why is the sun on fire? Checkmate

    Wow.

     

    How do you get through life?

     

     

    Through creationism I presume :P

    I was hoping it was a joke... 

  • gigatgigat Minneapolis, MNPosts: 604Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by AlBQuirky

     


    Originally posted by gigat
    And if you want a great example of a show that did it right, Firefly.

    I agree. When I first read the thread title, my mind went to a Firefly episode called "Objects In Space." In that episode, 2 of the cast were hiding outside of the ship in evac suits. When they were "on camera", all you heard was their breathing and the lines they spoke. Nothing else.

     

    I remember that one! Such a great series!  I wish it didn't get canceled.

    A few others have mentioned Babylon 5, I'll have to check that out.

    "Lose the helmet sis, we can't prove that you're retarded." - Dennis Reynolds

  • xm522xm522 Miami, FLPosts: 114Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Mattatron
    Originally posted by LittleBoot
    Originally posted by Mattatron
    Originally posted by LittleBoot
    Originally posted by Mattatron
    Originally posted by LittleBoot
    Without particles to vibrate within a vacuum there is no way to transmit sound.  However, within the atmosphere of a ship you would hear your own ship and sounds over the radio etc.  

    Space is not a "perfect vacuum". There are innumerable particles from innumerable sources traveling in every vector, all the time.

    But for the purposes of my point it is empty enough to prevent the transmission of sound- this is a gaming forum, not physics.  

    I suppose, if you were "in space" with only your "human parts" to observe the sudden expansion, you'd "hear" nothing because the mechanism "to hear" would be destroyed by the force.

    I was thinking more that it would come across as very odd in the context of a game because you would hear all the noises your ship is making, the engines and guns etc, but the people shooting at you would do so in silence; and it would just feel like a bug in practice.  

    I'd also note the change in force is only 1 atmosphere (and assuming explosive decompression hasn't occurred) which isn't that much; a couple of cosmonauts were accidently put into a vacuum in training- they crapped themselves and vomited copiously but suffered no other ill-effects.   

    I guess that depends on what's "exploding" or experiencing a sudden energy transformation. Any source of matter suddenly transforming to a state which is "not matter" emits particles in force, under E^2=(MC^2)^2+ (PC)^2. Yes, there are explosions in space, all the time.

    So if you just poked a hole in someone's hull, you're right, it's not going to amount to much. If you caused a sudden atomic reaction in a "fuel" substance for example, you wouldn't be worried about the sound, which would be the sudden expansion hitting the side of your ship's hull, smacking your ship like a bat hitting a baseball.

    - yes there are particles in space but because the density of such matter is so low the transmission of sound as well as physical soundwaves are null.

    once we get into space we really need to think of it as a semi-perfect vacuum. and the only energy that can move in this vacuum is in the form of lectro-magnetic radiation (photons). yeah a nuclear blast could explode right next to your ship, but you will never hear it. as an example we can think of the giant meteor that hit saturn not too long ago, that impact was in the magnitude of hundreds (or thousands) of equavlence to our strongest nukes, yet no sound ever reached our machinery.

    the problem might be that my definition of sound is strictly in the form of a mechanical wave because that's how our auditory system works.

    i believe you mught be able to hear some of the effects on your ship, per say those cause by electro-magnetic force. but there is no such thing as a schock-wave in space, simply because there exists a true lack of ozone density thick enough to achieve that avalanche effect. a shock wave here on earth happens when a large body of air (ozone) is displaced in an almost immediate timeframe thus creating an effect similar to sound. a shock-wave is actually just a regular preasure wave just like sound only on a much greater magnitude.

    I'm not saying that the photonic energy released from the explosion would not affect your ship (if it's powerfull enough it could disintegrate the ship), but the explosion itself would not be heard.

     

  • xm522xm522 Miami, FLPosts: 114Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Mattatron
    Originally posted by xm522

    in space you would not get a physical shock-wave because there isn't anything physical between the explosion and you.

    This isn't true. There's plenty of something there, but it's all "spaced very far apart" compared to matter.

    by the way, there are some states in which this particles live that you are not taking into consideration.

    1- small matter in space such as dust clumps together where ever there is an abundance of it. therefore in space you dont have such small particles floating around anywhere near each other in forms other than small rocks and such.

    2- atoms will either combine to produce some sort of material or they will be repulsed by each other because the coulomb force exceeds the gravitational attraction. this two particles will drift very very far from each other.

    3- the rest of the small particle life in space are short-lived fundamentals created when some of the above atoms collide.

  • ArglebargleArglebargle Austin, TXPosts: 1,416Member Uncommon

    If the spaceships are all going to fly like WWII airplanes, shouldn't they get the wooooshy sounds, etc, as well?

     

    I assume they are going to have the faux dogfight thing going on.   Yes/No?  Which really requires an atmosphere of some sort to work.   Are the capitol ships going to use wet navy tactics too?  

    If you are holding out for the perfect game, the only game you play will be the waiting one.

2»
Sign In or Register to comment.