Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Programming language as a religion

dave6660dave6660 New York, NYMember Posts: 2,572 Uncommon

This is not a new phenomenon but I am noticing it more lately and it's a little disconcerting.  Programmers who insist on using their language of choice for any and all projects.  This isn't a problem if we're talking about hobby projects but when this attitude is brought to work then it becomes a problem.

I've always seen programming languages as tools.  Each one has it's use.  Some are good for web applications, some are good for rapid prototyping, some are good for statistical analysis, etc.

I'm wondering if this is either a case of Maslow's Hammer ("if all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail") where they only know one or languages and are trying to stay relevant.  Perhaps they don't like anything out of their comfort zone.  I've read some people claim some programming languages are too easy to learn and therefore beneath them.  Other people say the refuse to use dynamically typed languages.  It's all very strange.

Thoughts?

 

“There are certain queer times and occasions in this strange mixed affair we call life when a man takes this whole universe for a vast practical joke, though the wit thereof he but dimly discerns, and more than suspects that the joke is at nobody's expense but his own.”
-- Herman Melville

Comments

  • TheLizardbonesTheLizardbones Arkham, VAMember Posts: 10,910 Common

    I've always used what seemed appropriate for the job, but with a preference towards using a language I was very familiar with so long as it could do the job. For instance, most business and database applications are fine when written in VB.Net, but if I'm going to write something for a micro controller, I'm not going to use VB anything or if I'm going to write something for an Android phone, I'm going to use Java.

    I can not remember winning or losing a single debate on the internet.

  • anemoanemo Member Posts: 1,007 Uncommon

    Just point and laugh.  

    Programming languages exsist for programmers to communicate with each other before anything else.   However other aspects like ease of use, debug, speed and others can easily be argued to be just as important or more so.

    Practice doesn't make perfect, practice makes permanent.

    "At one point technology meant making tech that could get to the moon, now it means making tech that could get you a taxi."

  • dave6660dave6660 New York, NYMember Posts: 2,572 Uncommon
    I guess you can consider me a mercenary.  I like whatever language(s) are currently paying my bills.  So right now my favorite languages are Java, PL/SQL and Bash.

    “There are certain queer times and occasions in this strange mixed affair we call life when a man takes this whole universe for a vast practical joke, though the wit thereof he but dimly discerns, and more than suspects that the joke is at nobody's expense but his own.”
    -- Herman Melville

  • l2avisml2avism Member Posts: 386 Uncommon

    I only use languages I like at home and use what others pick for me at work.

    I use C++ almost entirely at home but at work I use Perl, Java, Javascript, PHP and of course the big 3 database languages.

    People tend to complain that C++ is too hard or that it takes too long to complete anything. Usually its just that they are unfamiliar with it or buy into the hype that a good programmer needs to use over 9000 languages in any given project because relearning how to code 9000 times is more productive than just using the same language (and reusing code!).

    Some people actually boast about knowing so many languages, and 90% of them are nearly identical but always have some weird rule or syntax to differentiate.

    Though the languages I hate the most are the ones that people use not because they are easier, but because they buy into advertising and think that by just switching languages every 4 years you work more efficiently. (like Visual Basic coming out with new and sometimes incompatible versions all the time-- especially ASP)

    Using most managed languages are a pain if you are doing anything besides making a website or some ultra generic database frontend. Not to mention memory leaks caused by programmers raised on managed code that believe they are exempt from memory management. (seriously, how hard is it to assign to NULL to tell GC to delete or to not use allocators in loops?)

    Although the thing I hate the most about VB and C# is that it costs thousands of dollars to buy the IDE every 4 years and the legal agreement between you and Microsoft that allows them access to your code and gives them the ability to disallow you from using it. Most other languages are free.

  • DihoruDihoru ConstantaMember Posts: 2,731

    Obligatory joke by someone who isn't even a programmer:

    In the name of the Algorithm, the Source Code and the Holy Compile.

    image
Sign In or Register to comment.