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So, I want to make an MMO But have no clue how to...

13

Comments

  • ArChWindArChWind Some Place, WIPosts: 1,221Member Uncommon

    This one should go in developers corner.

    Seek a lawyer first and make sure you can afford the contracts.

  • tupodawg999tupodawg999 LondonPosts: 724Member Uncommon
    do it as a board game first with just paper, card, pencils, d6 etc
  • IcewhiteIcewhite Elmhurst, ILPosts: 6,403Member
    Originally posted by Quizzical
    If you want your game to ever exist, you basically have two options: 1)  Make it yourself. 2)  Get rich and then hire other people to make it for you.

    And 3) of course:

    Go to work for someone else, accept that you're going to have to compromise. The Fine Art of Creating For Pay.

    Self-pity imprisons us in the walls of our own self-absorption. The whole world shrinks down to the size of our problem, and the more we dwell on it, the smaller we are and the larger the problem seems to grow.

  • BahamutKaiserBahamutKaiser Hyattsville, MDPosts: 314Member Uncommon
    Without really analyzing your particular idea, I'd say ignore most of these critics and do some research on templates and enabling programs to piece your idea together. Almost no MMO makes their own engines because its extra work and they have a lot to do. This pretty much describes you to, find available programs which have much of the programming done already, and get to work on it til you inspire some assistance or get attention from some funders.

    Sorry I don't have the resources linked for you, all I know is that there are several of them free, and if you ask some actually informed people, they will probably show you how.The developer section might be a good place to start...

    Before you criticize someone, walk a mile in their shoes.
    That way, if they get angry, they'll be a mile away... and barefoot.

  • FiredornFiredorn Montreal, QCPosts: 93Member

    I've been developing software for decades...I can tell you one thing.

    Start small and use your experience to build up your projects.

    You need to learn the basics of development, alone.  Once you get the basics down, you need to learn how to develop games (single player ones).  You can even start with text based stuff...learn how to handle interaction, randomization and debugging code.  You need a lot of this.  Once you get that down, you can probably start dabbling with simple "game makers" and start making single player games.  However simple they may be, your ideas can start being fleshed out in a single player fashion.

    Most importantly, throughout everything, DOCUMENT EVERYTHING...from planning to coding to documenting bugs and their solutions to post mortems.  You will NOT remember everything at all times.  You're already older now than you were when you started reading this post, age deteriorates that.

    A MMOG is a huge undertaking...you WILL probably need a team and some experience in knowing how to handle certain situations.  Software development is in its most basic form the same accross any type of project...the only thing that changes is the scope.  The scope of a MMOG is ginormous.

  • fayknaymfayknaym Washington, DCPosts: 125Member

    I think you should look into Java. Runescape was made in Java and it was one of the most popular browser based games in the world. I agree with the others about starting small.

    For example, for the card battle system, build a program that will take one input (card) read the information associated with that card and compare it to another input (card) and then decide a winner based on the outcome. It doesn't have to been anything complicated. You could just make a simple window that has two selections, like two drop down boxes with variables that you can select like "a,b,c,etc." whose properties are defined in the program (like "a" would have "attackPower=3" and "defense=4" and a button that will compare the two selections.

    I've never made a game before and have only done some light programming but this was just an idea I had. You could make small programs like this for all aspects of your game to get an understanding of how those systems would work and then slowly begin to expand on them and link them together.

  • GishgeronGishgeron Princeton, KYPosts: 1,287Member

     

      Something to mention....

      Game Maker also has a version you pay for thats a tier above the regular purchased version.  It comes with the ability to port the game into the correct format for the Android and iOS marketplaces.  It also supports multiplayer elements, and could EASILY be used to create a simple version of your card game which a person might play connected to people on their contact list.  The work needed for that isn't even all that bad, using GM.  Its not EASY...I mean, that would be lying to you in a very nasty way.  No matter what tool you use, it can't do everything.  IN game maker that means having to create your own "expansions" to the system using straight up programming.  But it will easily curtail half of the workload for you on this.  Using the tool in this way, to get a version of your game going that you can use to "test" with friends using smartphones is BRILLIANT.  Android is your best starting place here...apple is, ah..a bit of a bastard regarding ease of use with their service. 

      Tragically, its also still one of the most profitable platforms.  But you don't need profit.  You need to get your feet wet and really get a taste of the action.  Game Maker has its own basic game tutorial built into it, as well as some genre specific tuts you can download that are really useful and awesome learning experiences. 

      But before you get any further with this...I have a small piece of advice.  Its a mirror of something another person said.  Don't start telling your whole game ideal.  Its actually destructive to YOU, because your brain gets the same pleasure sensation from explaining a thing as it does from doing it.  It will actively hurt your willpower, and this is NOT the field to have weak will.  You're gonna have days in this where you spend, literally, 5 hours combing through your code trying to figure out why one small detail isn't working right.  Its going to suck.  You WILL start losing your mind and hating it.  Unless you have an experienced programmer on hand to talk to about these issues, learning it by yourself is trial and error of the absolutely worst magnitude and you need all of your energy you can save dedicated toward it.

      Now, here's how you can help yourself stay focused and get this done.

      Its a card game, so start with 10 cards.  Really dig deep and ask how you can make those 10 cards fun to play.  Ask how you can make them interesting to see, and how those visuals make them so distinctive that a player will KNOW what it does at a glance.  Play a mock game with just those cards and try to achieve a balance with them so no combination of them will break your game.  Once that is fun, add 10 more.    Never start with the whole problem.  Cleaning an entire house is HARD.  Cleaning a room is just a little crappy.  Cleaning a table off, or picking up the floor in that room is easy.  Break your game down to that level and work with it in that way.  Have a loose outline, but never demand you adhere to it.  Accept, right now, that you should not be attatched to the large ideal. 

      Its easy to make a BAD game because you tried to force good cake into a sour belly.  Your grand ideal might not be as much fun as your small sample.  So you have to expand that sample until it becomes a large ideal.  You do not try to condense it the other way, that tends to make you force certain elements and that never ends well.  Look at Far Cry 3's multiplayer.  Forced.  Bad

    image

  • AxehiltAxehilt Posts: 10,309Member Rare

    The cleaning analogy makes me think a Construction analogy is very apt:

    • Building a game is a lot like building a house.  It's a place for your gamer(s) to live.
    • Building a small game is like building a tree house:
      • with carpentry knowledge, you can build an awfully nice looking tree house.
      • with electrician knowledge, you can hook up lights and maybe give it a badass desk with an outlet for a laptop.
      • with plumbing knowledge, you can hook up a sink up there and maybe have enough amenities to cook and store food up there.
      • with additional types of knowledge you can add a real door, a pulley/winch elevator, and well-sealed paned windows.
      • It's possible to have all these skills at a competent level, but it takes a LOT of time to do it all yourself.
    • Remember all this work just creates a tree house (little games like Kongregate-style java/fllash games.)
    • It's not a full-on house (full-featured singleplayer game.)
    • MMORPGs are apartment complexes.
    Basically if you're not going to make a career out of it, building houses or apartment complexes doesn't really make sense.  It's far more realistic that you can build a completely badass tree house though!
     
    The analogy isn't 100% accurate of course, because things exist like MMO Bomberman or MMO Minesweeper or Realm of the Mad God which could ostensibly have been built by one person each.  But these games have very smartly-constrained featuresets in order to work.  Also these games are more like creating a drive-in movie theater: they're fun little distractions, but they don't have anywhere near the amenities required for you to want to spend loads of time there.  Like a drive-in movie theater they're pretty cheap to make if you do it right (you just need a giant screen, a projector, and a bunch of audio hookups) -- and unlike drive-in theaters there's actually more of an audience for this sort of thing ;)

    "What is truly revealing is his implication that believing something to be true is the same as it being true. [continue]" -John Oliver

  • SagasaintSagasaint Miami, FLPosts: 461Member Uncommon

    "Hello guys

    I want to make an MMO.

    I have absolutly no knowledge of any coding language, nor about graphic design, but I came up with this totally derivative idea of background that took me a whole 5 minutes to develop

    so i guess thats most of the work to do, right? "

     

     

    you want to make an MMO?

     

    1) coding

    learn C++ then work on increasingly bigger and dificultier projects for a few years until they point where you THINK you have mastered the language and all its ins and outs...only to find your sorely mistaken. then after some more work, you are ready to move to another higher level language like C# where you have a lot to learn once again

     

    do the same for server languages, since its an MMO and you will spend half your time designing a client that has to communicate with a server

     

    then pick either OpenGL or DirectX (or both most likely) and get ready to spend months drowned in documentation while learning to use them

     

    2) graphics

    learn 3-D modeling,then 3-D animating for another...oh what I should say...couple years? use that time to start producing the enormous amounts of assets that you will need in your game

     

    3) engine

    learn a game engine, several free around, then learn how to put 1) and 2) together

    and no, i dont mean scripting shit like RPGMAKER, calling that an engine is insulting...I mean Ogre or Unity and above

    of course even the most basic and limited engines  will take an experienced programmer quite a lot to master, LET ALONE tweak the existing modules to fit their specific needs, LET ALONE develop their own modules, both of which any serious MMO developer would have to do

    and for the sake of making this point as clear as humanly possible, let me stress it again, dont call RPGMAKER and the such "game engines"...just dont...if you want to be taken seriously fo even a split second, DONT

     

    4) work

    get AT THE VERY LEAST a group of 10 likeminded individuals and get ready to spend ALL your free time on making the game for a few more years

     

     

     

    then MAYBE you'll be able to produce something worth being on a harddrive for more than 20 seconds...but then, most likely no, still crapware

     

    but if you have reached this far, i suppose you will be sufficiently qualified in many areas (and with a lot of work, expert in a couple of them) so you'll meet the requirements to apply for a job at some serious game studio and be put to work on real stuff instead of being given menial tasks like unit testing or code refactoring

    congratz. finally you will see shit getting done

     

     

     

     

    honestly, if i were given a dime everytime I see one of this threads I'd have enough to fund my own MMO by now.Its simply hilarious.

     

     

     

    "Hi guys, I like general hospital soap operas, once I skimmed thru the first pages of an anatomy book, and my girlfirend thinks I would look hawt with a scalpel in my hand...do you think I could get a job as Neurosurgeon without doing the mandatory 10-15 year long studies first?"

  • WalterWhiteWalterWhite CardiffPosts: 400Member Uncommon
    Looks like the OP and EA have something in common, neither know how to make a MMO but at least the OP asks how to.

    image

  • TsumoroTsumoro EozeaPosts: 426Member Uncommon

    OP here, 

     

    was quite surprised to see people still offering advice and opinions on this. It is quite heart warming and I thank each and everyone of you.

    Now, I did some research last night (if you wish to call it that) to which I put my feelers out there about what I wanted to do, and what step I wanted to reach first. Now, I think I am going to do (as some suggested) smaller projects to essentially 'gear' myself up to a position to which makes my ultimate dream much more realisitc. How long will this take? Who knows, and in honest the time aspect or the money aspect is not too much of a concern for me as this is a 'personal' project. Of courase, if I succeed I would hope people liked and played my game after all making sure your intended audience enjoys what you have created is part of the fun and satisfaction. 

    So, basically I have downloaded two trials to RPGmaker and Gamemaker, I am going to dabble around in those for a little bit with the intent of getting the full programs at a later date. Who knows, if I make something for the android and iOS I might receive the funding I need to help greatly with my main game idea. We shall see!

    I also picked up some Java for newbs infformation which I shall have as some bed side reading, although not planning to get too heavy into it yet as it will distract me too much to one of my other things I am doing which should hopefully end soon which is making my own DnD Campaign which I want to try and get published. So once I can set that down for a bit I can kick in the Java stuff and retain it. 

     

    As to the person who mentioned to document everything, I would say that is also my intention. I am not like Sheldon from the Big Bang Theory with a powerful memory and I find access to a well organised series of documents about how I worked things out etc much more manageable system. 

     

    Again, 

     

    I thank you from the bottom of my heart x

  • LoktofeitLoktofeit Stone Mountain, GAPosts: 14,247Member Rare
    Originally posted by Sagasaint

    "Hi guys, I like general hospital soap operas, once I skimmed thru the first pages of an anatomy book, and my girlfirend thinks I would look hawt with a scalpel in my hand...do you think I could get a job as Neurosurgeon without doing the mandatory 10-15 year long studies first?"

    That's the biggest reality that people making these posts need to face, but it is always considered mean or rude to even dare suggest it.

    There isn't a "right" or "wrong" way to play, if you want to use a screwdriver to put nails into wood, have at it, simply don't complain when the guy next to you with the hammer is doing it much better and easier. - Allein
    "Graphics are often supplied by Engines that (some) MMORPG's are built in" - Spuffyre

  • WereLlamaWereLlama Lubbock, TXPosts: 244Member Uncommon

    Hello future online game builder!

    I made may own small online mmo years ago (from idea to making money, to losing money, to shutting down).

    FYI:

    1. It  was tiny but took over one thousand hours to build (many sleepness nights thinking of solutions to problems).

    2. It cost me for licensing, server ,bandwidth and little odds and ends, over 50k of my personal income.

    3. Required me to learn how to be a better programer, artists, music editor, and writer.

    4. Was an amazing experience where I learned alot about player behavior and what I can and cannot do.

    Suggestion:

    Make a chat room first where people can connect and just talk to each other.  If you cant do that, you will not be able to make an mmo with actual gameplay.

    Good luck!

    -Blitz

  • LoktofeitLoktofeit Stone Mountain, GAPosts: 14,247Member Rare
    Originally posted by BlitzVF
    Hello future online game builder! I made may own small online mmo years ago (from idea to making money, to losing money, to shutting down). FYI: 1. It  was tiny but took over one thousand hours to build (many sleepness nights thinking of solutions to problems). 2. It cost me for licensing, server ,bandwidth and little odds and ends, over 50k of my personal income. 3. Required me to learn how to be a better programer, artists, music editor, and writer. 4. Was an amazing experience where I learned alot about player behavior and what I can and cannot do. Suggestion: Make a chat room first where people can connect and just talk to each other.  If you cant do that, you will not be able to make an mmo with actual gameplay. Good luck! -Blitz

    Completed it and went live? Nice work! That's no easy task, Blitz :)

     

    There isn't a "right" or "wrong" way to play, if you want to use a screwdriver to put nails into wood, have at it, simply don't complain when the guy next to you with the hammer is doing it much better and easier. - Allein
    "Graphics are often supplied by Engines that (some) MMORPG's are built in" - Spuffyre

  • ReskaillevReskaillev mechelenPosts: 157Member Common
    Originally posted by Tsumoro
    OP here,    was quite surprised to see people still offering advice and opinions on this. It is quite heart warming and I thank each and everyone of you. Now, I did some research last night (if you wish to call it that) to which I put my feelers out there about what I wanted to do, and what step I wanted to reach first. Now, I think I am going to do (as some suggested) smaller projects to essentially 'gear' myself up to a position to which makes my ultimate dream much more realisitc. How long will this take? Who knows, and in honest the time aspect or the money aspect is not too much of a concern for me as this is a 'personal' project. Of courase, if I succeed I would hope people liked and played my game after all making sure your intended audience enjoys what you have created is part of the fun and satisfaction.  So, basically I have downloaded two trials to RPGmaker and Gamemaker, I am going to dabble around in those for a little bit with the intent of getting the full programs at a later date. Who knows, if I make something for the android and iOS I might receive the funding I need to help greatly with my main game idea. We shall see! I also picked up some Java for newbs infformation which I shall have as some bed side reading, although not planning to get too heavy into it yet as it will distract me too much to one of my other things I am doing which should hopefully end soon which is making my own DnD Campaign which I want to try and get published. So once I can set that down for a bit I can kick in the Java stuff and retain it.    As to the person who mentioned to document everything, I would say that is also my intention. I am not like Sheldon from the Big Bang Theory with a powerful memory and I find access to a well organised series of documents about how I worked things out etc much more manageable system.    Again,    I thank you from the bottom of my heart x

    yup always start small :)

    Good luck with your dream!

     

     

    "Isn't a raid plundering villages in WoW or something like that?" - Robert Desable

  • CaldrinCaldrin CwmbranPosts: 4,505Member Uncommon

    As others have said start small.. make soem basic games then go from there.

    Maknig an MMO is a lot of work.. the mroe you can do yourself the better really..

     

    Best engines to look at are probally unity and Hero Cloud... there are other engines out there like Unreal and Cryengine but to get access to the net code to allow you to do any mmo stuff you would need to pay quite a big license fee..

     

    Best place to start are the unity forums or hero cloud forums...

     

    Good luck.

  • YamotaYamota LondonPosts: 6,593Member Uncommon

    A lot of people in this thread are saying that making MMOs takes time, and I am sure this is right, but what exactly is it that takes so long time? 

    Is it the amount of code, for the game logic, you need to produce? The 3D art assests?

    If so, would you not be able to reduce the latter one by either buying 3D asserts or finding free ones? And using an engine, to reduce the physics engine stuff?

    What specifically is it that takes so long time?

  • benseinebenseine HaarlemPosts: 243Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Tsumoro
    I think the thread title says it all. I love games, and I love MMO's and I have always had a desire to 'make' something. Now, I have, in the past made my share of games using in-house systems such as RPGmaker but never really entertained (until recently) putting a concept together from scratch.  Now I know a lot of technical people view these forums and I was wondering, what would I need to 'learn' in order to make an MMO. I am not talking something like WoW, but something that is a bit differen't. Any assistance, or guidance people can give on this matter would be wonderful.    I suppose I should also share my concept so people know what I am planning. I also made some quick paint based pictures so you would have a general idea what I want to achieve.  [Concept] The concept is a Card based PvE and PvP MMORPG which has a simular style to that of Tetra Master (back when you used to be able to play it, I loved that game so much).    [My Vision] [PvE] There would be a massive map system that you would navigate, I am talking huge and it would have random battles to which you face monster cards. You use your cards to defeat the monsters. Your cards, do damage based on the statistics of your avatar. Defeating the monster gives you 'random' loot based on the monster or monsters your defeated. So they might drop, resrouces cards, monster cards, item cards or gear cards.  There would also be quests you can pick up which also reward you with new more powerful cards.  Combat will simular like how Tetra master worked, but rather than the cards dealing damage based on their own set of variables, their damage and abilities scales with your avatar and the equipment they have equipped. There will also be a doll of your avatar on screen wearing the equipment so other people can see when you group pve or pvp.  Monster fights will determine how many cards you can play. You will be able to place x amount of cards depending on how big the battle field is. You will be able to make decks of up to 52 cards and have several decks for several purposes. Some for example might be magic, resist, dps, tanking, healing etc the effectiveness of which are dependant on your avatars equipped gear.  PvE will be a singular experience for th emost part, forging your own destiny. There will be quests, but nothing defined on what you should and shouldnt do. I want a map with plenty of secrets and challenges to explore which reward dutiful people.  There will be grouping however, special missions, dungeons and raids which you can either pre-form or queue into and depending on the size of the challenege determines how many cards each player can use. Some might be very open 52 cards each on some raids, some might be as restrictive as 5 each.  Cards will also take damage and require repair to which gold will be a currency, you can obtain gold by selling cards to vendors and to other players.  Crafting will also exist to which their will be crafting and resource based cards.    [PvP] Would be a lobby based system and cut-throat. The winner of a PvP battle will get to choose a card from their opponent. It would be a balanced system based on people 'deck stength'. Decks are made and stored to which can hold up to 52 cards each. Consumable cards are depleted when used.  Players will be able to set lobbies up with battlefield restrictions (like 10 cards, 20 cards or an all in 52 card deck). I would also like to make battlefields with objectives which rewarded the victors with unique cards for hitting those objectives.    Please feel free to ask any questions, I know my writting skills are not my 'stong' point. But I am a man, with no experience in this industry with a vision I would like to see realised. So, any pointers on what I should take as the first step, what I need to learn, what coding etc etc would go a LONG way.    Thanking you.    Tsu

    Think you should go to http://www.indiedb.com. This is the wrong website.

  • RidelynnRidelynn Fresno, CAPosts: 5,097Member Rare

    Here's my only advice:

    Start.

    It doesn't matter what your background is. It doesn't matter what tools you try to use. What matters is that you start doing ~something~.

    I've seen games programmed by 10 year olds. I've seen games programmed by senior citizens. I've seen games programmed by housepainters.

    I've seen games programmed in Basic. I've seen games programmed on the TI-85. I've seen games programmed into an Excel Spreadsheet.

    The biggest hurdle isn't finding some programming language, or going to classes, or getting a degree, or anything else. The biggest hurdle is getting started, and then after that staying motivated long enough to overcome the inevitable obstacles to finish.

  • ReskaillevReskaillev mechelenPosts: 157Member Common
    Originally posted by Yamota
    A lot of people in this thread are saying that making MMOs takes time, and I am sure this is right, but what exactly is it that takes so long time?  Is it the amount of code, for the game logic, you need to produce? The 3D art assests? If so, would you not be able to reduce the latter one by either buying 3D asserts or finding free ones? And using an engine, to reduce the physics engine stuff? What specifically is it that takes so long time?

    You can easily cut down on art assets if you make an mmo like Realm of The Mad God.

    It's definitely the amount of code that you need to create that is annoying, also getting everything to work together is no easy feat... (clent-server connection, gui, basic gameplay and so on)

     

    Using an engine is always an easy solution to circumvent some of these problems and is what most developers do. (There are almost no hardcoded games anymore because it would take too long)  Learning the engine can be difficult in some cases. Also the impression that most people seem to have is something akin to RPGmaker which is total bullshit. An engine in it's most basic form is just a bunch of classes/functions bundled together in a library from which you can only acces the interface files. (Unless the engine is free-source offcourse)

     

    Even while using an engine, the time to get a game ready is still a really tiresome process. 

     

     

    "Isn't a raid plundering villages in WoW or something like that?" - Robert Desable

  • ReskaillevReskaillev mechelenPosts: 157Member Common
    Originally posted by Ridelynn
    Here's my only advice: Start. It doesn't matter what your background is. It doesn't matter what tools you try to use. What matters is that you start doing ~something~. I've seen games programmed by 10 year olds. I've seen games programmed by senior citizens. I've seen games programmed by housepainters. I've seen games programmed in Basic. I've seen games programmed on the TI-85. I've seen games programmed into an Excel Spreadsheet. The biggest hurdle isn't finding some programming language, or going to classes, or getting a degree, or anything else. The biggest hurdle is getting started, and then after that staying motivated long enough to overcome the inevitable obstacles to finish.

    This is actually the biggest hurdle in any programming challenge: The fact that you need to stay motivated throughout the whole process.

    The end result will be fantastic but the road towards this result is a lengthy one.

    "Isn't a raid plundering villages in WoW or something like that?" - Robert Desable

  • YamotaYamota LondonPosts: 6,593Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Reskaillev
    Originally posted by Ridelynn
    Here's my only advice: Start. It doesn't matter what your background is. It doesn't matter what tools you try to use. What matters is that you start doing ~something~. I've seen games programmed by 10 year olds. I've seen games programmed by senior citizens. I've seen games programmed by housepainters. I've seen games programmed in Basic. I've seen games programmed on the TI-85. I've seen games programmed into an Excel Spreadsheet. The biggest hurdle isn't finding some programming language, or going to classes, or getting a degree, or anything else. The biggest hurdle is getting started, and then after that staying motivated long enough to overcome the inevitable obstacles to finish.

    This is actually the biggest hurdle in any programming challenge: The fact that you need to stay motivated throughout the whole process.

    The end result will be fantastic but the road towards this result is a lengthy one.

    Altough this is true, as a SW developer (not gaming), I know that it is quite important to use the right tools for the right job. That's not saying it is not useful to just start getting your hands dirty, you should, but when you do start to build something worthwhile it is important to use the right technologies.

    For example, using an engine without built in MMORPG network support could turn out to be a big misstake if you are trying to build an MMO.

  • YamotaYamota LondonPosts: 6,593Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Reskaillev
    Originally posted by Yamota
    A lot of people in this thread are saying that making MMOs takes time, and I am sure this is right, but what exactly is it that takes so long time?  Is it the amount of code, for the game logic, you need to produce? The 3D art assests? If so, would you not be able to reduce the latter one by either buying 3D asserts or finding free ones? And using an engine, to reduce the physics engine stuff? What specifically is it that takes so long time?

    You can easily cut down on art assets if you make an mmo like Realm of The Mad God.

    It's definitely the amount of code that you need to create that is annoying, also getting everything to work together is no easy feat... (clent-server connection, gui, basic gameplay and so on)

     

    Using an engine is always an easy solution to circumvent some of these problems and is what most developers do. (There are almost no hardcoded games anymore because it would take too long)  Learning the engine can be difficult in some cases. Also the impression that most people seem to have is something akin to RPGmaker which is total bullshit. An engine in it's most basic form is just a bunch of classes/functions bundled together in a library from which you can only acces the interface files. (Unless the engine is free-source offcourse)

     

    Even while using an engine, the time to get a game ready is still a really tiresome process. 

    Ok, so how would you get started? I work professionally in web application development and there we use a process called Scrum where we list a set of functional requirements, called stories, prioritize them, then build them iteratively, in 2-4 weeks iterations, by chopping them down into technical tasks and implementing those tasks, together with testing.

    Is that a proper way to develop a game as well or should you use a different approach?

  • ReskaillevReskaillev mechelenPosts: 157Member Common
    Originally posted by Yamota
    Originally posted by Reskaillev
    Originally posted by Ridelynn
    Here's my only advice: Start. It doesn't matter what your background is. It doesn't matter what tools you try to use. What matters is that you start doing ~something~. I've seen games programmed by 10 year olds. I've seen games programmed by senior citizens. I've seen games programmed by housepainters. I've seen games programmed in Basic. I've seen games programmed on the TI-85. I've seen games programmed into an Excel Spreadsheet. The biggest hurdle isn't finding some programming language, or going to classes, or getting a degree, or anything else. The biggest hurdle is getting started, and then after that staying motivated long enough to overcome the inevitable obstacles to finish.

    This is actually the biggest hurdle in any programming challenge: The fact that you need to stay motivated throughout the whole process.

    The end result will be fantastic but the road towards this result is a lengthy one.

    Altough this is true, as a SW developer (not gaming), I know that it is quite important to use the right tools for the right job. That's not saying it is not useful to just start getting your hands dirty, you should, but when you do start to build something worthwhile it is important to use the right technologies.

    For example, using an engine without built in MMORPG network support could turn out to be a big misstake if you are trying to build an MMO.

    Seems common sense to me that you choice an engine that suits your needs in the best way possible :) Also selecting all of the assets based on some very basic criteria (that are based on the type of game you want to develop) is an easy thing. 

    There are some guys of coure...

     

    And games are just software, so most of the processes are the same. Added functionalities are also introduced like story, playtesting, ....

    But mostly game programming and writing the stories is seperated so yes, the process is quite the same. 

     

    Btw: You are guy that has a team and years of experience. (You probably studied for software development as well) OP has no team and no experience. The time to get everything working for OP is thus phenomenal!

    "Isn't a raid plundering villages in WoW or something like that?" - Robert Desable

  • YamotaYamota LondonPosts: 6,593Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Reskaillev
    Originally posted by Yamota
    Originally posted by Reskaillev
    Originally posted by Ridelynn
    Here's my only advice: Start. It doesn't matter what your background is. It doesn't matter what tools you try to use. What matters is that you start doing ~something~. I've seen games programmed by 10 year olds. I've seen games programmed by senior citizens. I've seen games programmed by housepainters. I've seen games programmed in Basic. I've seen games programmed on the TI-85. I've seen games programmed into an Excel Spreadsheet. The biggest hurdle isn't finding some programming language, or going to classes, or getting a degree, or anything else. The biggest hurdle is getting started, and then after that staying motivated long enough to overcome the inevitable obstacles to finish.

    This is actually the biggest hurdle in any programming challenge: The fact that you need to stay motivated throughout the whole process.

    The end result will be fantastic but the road towards this result is a lengthy one.

    Altough this is true, as a SW developer (not gaming), I know that it is quite important to use the right tools for the right job. That's not saying it is not useful to just start getting your hands dirty, you should, but when you do start to build something worthwhile it is important to use the right technologies.

    For example, using an engine without built in MMORPG network support could turn out to be a big misstake if you are trying to build an MMO.

    Seems common sense to me that you choice an engine that suits your needs in the best way possible :) Also selecting all of the assets based on some very basic criteria (that are based on the type of game you want to develop) is an easy thing. 

    There are some guys of coure...

     

    And games are just software, so most of the processes are the same. Added functionalities are also introduced like story, playtesting, ....

    But mostly game programming and writing the stories is seperated so yes, the process is quite the same. 

     

    Btw: You are guy that has a team and years of experience. (You probably studied for software development as well) OP has no team and no experience. The time to get everything working for OP is thus phenomenal!

    True, ofcourse, that they are all software but the problem with creating games, for me, is that I dont know where to start. With Web Applications I write down the things I want to do with it, then choose the frameworks and tools I want, then create the data, service and view layers, iteratively. And after an iteration or two you have something you can see and hopefully use.

    But for gaming; Where do you start? Obviously you need to have an idea but assuming you know what you want to develop and then want to actuall start doing it. At what end do you start?

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