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Do You Remember When....

13

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  • CalerxesCalerxes LondonPosts: 1,630Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by SnarlingWolf
    Originally posted by maskedweasel

     

    Do you remember ...

    SNIP!

    Most of those things have nothing to do with a game and everything to do with the gamer which may have well been your point.

     

    When the MMO genre was first formed there simply wasn't the mentality to get to max level ASAP and although some people crunched all the numbers to find the perfect builds, the majority just made and played what they wanted.

     

    Over the years the idea that you have to level the most efficient way and must play only the absolute best builds has creeped into the majority of the player base. But there are still those of us who make what we want and when groups won't let us in for being "non-optimal" we just shrug and move on until we find another open minded group.

     

    The interesting thing to me about the AC2 beta right now is there is a big group of people who are happy to be there, are exploring, playing whatever class interests them, and accepting any group they want. Then there is another big group of people who are already exluding classes from their groups who might decrease their XP per hour and are doing everything they can to max cap immediately. It just shows how prevelant that mindset is now.

    I join any group and invite anyone in as long as they meet the entry level for the dungeon/quest and have fun with it. I think that is the key to enjoying any game, just play your way and don't worry about keeping pace with others or playing the way they want you to.

     

    This reminds me off the recent progression servers in EQ, as I'd only ever played a private server of original EQ I was interested in these new servers to see what all the fuss was about, so I jumped in with both feet and had a go and it was an interesting time for a while but as I played and chatted to people rumours of max level toons were already circulating only a few weeks after launch and that got me thinking how the heck are people doing this as I was progressing very slowly. It dawned on me that of course these guys were EQ vets had ready made perfectly set up groups, logged in every night and knew all the good grinding spots, basically well prepared min/maxers going for server firsts, they were making a mockery of the level times as they had eliminated all the obsticles that were there originally due to ignorance of how to play EQ in its early days.

    This is at the core of the nostalgia people have lost that feeling of discovery because they've seen it all before multiple times and turning the clock back will not bring back that sense of discovery again. They need to exit the genre for a few years as I did with FPS games a few years ago and come back when they've changed enough.

    This doom and gloom thread was brought to you by Chin Up™ the new ultra high caffeine soft drink for gamers who just need that boost of happiness after a long forum session.

  • nariusseldonnariusseldon santa clara, CAPosts: 22,441Member
    Originally posted by ObiClownobi
    Originally posted by nariusseldon
    Originally posted by Reklaw

    nariusseldon: You probelby do not understand that those of us who want a more virtual world want to be entertained by that aswell it might not be the type of entertainment you seek. If I want fast entertainment I am lucky to enjoy allot of other genre of games. Never thought MMORPG would be put into the fast entertainment type, but long term entertaining virtual worlds to play in as we please at our own pace why rush if what's not done today can be done tomorrow/nextweek/month instead of being told what to do and rushing towards the same gameplay multiplayer games already offer.

    How can i not understand when this "virtual world" thing is being flogged to death here every day? Don't confuse between understanding and agreeing. I just don't share that preference.

     

    8432 posts, believe us, we know

    And yet some sounds like they are surprised when they are confronted with preferences other than their own.

  • CecropiaCecropia Posts: 3,472Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by ObiClownobi
    Originally posted by nariusseldon
    Originally posted by Reklaw

    nariusseldon: You probelby do not understand that those of us who want a more virtual world want to be entertained by that aswell it might not be the type of entertainment you seek. If I want fast entertainment I am lucky to enjoy allot of other genre of games. Never thought MMORPG would be put into the fast entertainment type, but long term entertaining virtual worlds to play in as we please at our own pace why rush if what's not done today can be done tomorrow/nextweek/month instead of being told what to do and rushing towards the same gameplay multiplayer games already offer.

    How can i not understand when this "virtual world" thing is being flogged to death here every day? Don't confuse between understanding and agreeing. I just don't share that preference.

     

    8432 posts, believe us, we know

    Yeah, to be honest, I think I pretty much got the gist of things at this point. Repetition for emphasis, I suppose image

    "Mr. Rothstein, your people never will understand... the way it works out here. You're all just our guests. But you act like you're at home. Let me tell you something, partner. You ain't home. But that's where we're gonna send you if it harelips the governor." - Pat Webb

  • CalerxesCalerxes LondonPosts: 1,630Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by nariusseldon
    Originally posted by ObiClownobi
    Originally posted by nariusseldon
    Originally posted by Reklaw

    nariusseldon: You probelby do not understand that those of us who want a more virtual world want to be entertained by that aswell it might not be the type of entertainment you seek. If I want fast entertainment I am lucky to enjoy allot of other genre of games. Never thought MMORPG would be put into the fast entertainment type, but long term entertaining virtual worlds to play in as we please at our own pace why rush if what's not done today can be done tomorrow/nextweek/month instead of being told what to do and rushing towards the same gameplay multiplayer games already offer.

    How can i not understand when this "virtual world" thing is being flogged to death here every day? Don't confuse between understanding and agreeing. I just don't share that preference.

     

    8432 posts, believe us, we know

    And yet some sounds like they are surprised when they are confronted with preferences other than their own.

     

    I'm sensing you are missng the Obi's point here, amirite?

    This doom and gloom thread was brought to you by Chin Up™ the new ultra high caffeine soft drink for gamers who just need that boost of happiness after a long forum session.

  • ScotScot UKPosts: 5,769Member Uncommon

    I do remember when and it was great times. But I ask you this. Do you think in ten years time players will be saying:

     

    Do you remember when we had guilds?

    Do you remember when we had crafting?

    Do you remember when we had factions?

    Do you remember when we had grouping?

    Do you remember when we had money you could earn in game and everthing was not paid for with real money?

    Do you remember when you had vendors you could sell loot to?

    Do you remember when we did not all just stand in a lobby?

    Do you remember when we had raids?

     

    This is not a process that has stopped. It carries on and I don't think defenders of the modern easymode MMO quite get that.

  • IsawaIsawa Middle 0 Nowhere, ORPosts: 1,051Member
    Originally posted by maskedweasel
    Originally posted by TwoThreeFour
    I remember when the OP was a SWTOR fanatic.

    It really is based more around a community, and one that matters.  People saying that the old games were great back then but they aren't good now probably haven't played them.  SWG preNGE was a fantastic game.  The level of community interaction was amazing on many levels that is extremely rare to find today.  

    I was thinking about SWG when reading through the list, but I still apply plenty of the list to my current game(s).

  • maskedweaselmaskedweasel houston, TXPosts: 7,277Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Scot

    I do remember when and it was great times. But I ask you this. Do you think in ten years time players will be saying:

     

    Do you remember when we had guilds?

    Do you remember when we had crafting?

    Do you remember when we had factions?

    Do you remember when we had grouping?

    Do you remember when we had money you could earn in game and everthing was not paid for with real money?

    Do you remember when you had vendors you could sell loot to?

    Do you remember when we did not all just stand in a lobby?

    Do you remember when we had raids?

     

    This is not a process that has stopped. It carries on and I don't think defenders of the modern easymode MMO quite get that.

    Interesting point... and you might be right, in another 10 years.. we might be asking where all this has gone too.  Who knows.. maybe the MMO genre won't even be recognizable in the next 10 years.  

     

    The point is, there are a lot of systems that we had in place then,  that increased the enjoyment and immersion and community aspect of - what is expected to be the pinnacle of multiplayer games.   Streamlining is one thing, to make the UI easier to read and to use, to make the graphics more enjoyable,  but you are right -- with the current age of "ease of use" it removes the necessity to really work for anything.  Least of all a community.

     

     

    "Loan me a Dragon I wanna see space"


    image

  • SilverchildSilverchild Grand-Mere, QCPosts: 118Member
    Originally posted by SnarlingWolf

    When the MMO genre was first formed there simply wasn't the mentality to get to max level ASAP and although some people crunched all the numbers to find the perfect builds, the majority just made and played what they wanted.

     

    Over the years the idea that you have to level the most efficient way and must play only the absolute best builds has creeped into the majority of the player base. But there are still those of us who make what we want and when groups won't let us in for being "non-optimal" we just shrug and move on until we find another open minded group.

     

     

    That was cool, but I dont think its a shift in gamers mentality that caused it, I think its a shift in game design.

     

    I mean, you could be a complete noob in UO and experience "high level content" right away if you had friends to take you there. I remember hunting dragons with a group when I was a complete noob, shooting with my bow and doing almost no damage. But hey, I was still helping, and I was having fun. So of course I had absolutely no pressure to level as fast as I can.

    Nowadays... can you even ENTER a high level dungeon as a low level character?

    Games have elvolved and put in place so much artificial restriction on content ( and even gear checks now!) that it does encourage players to try to reach the level cap ASAP to experience it.  Its only normal.

  • ScotScot UKPosts: 5,769Member Uncommon

    The levelling attitude was imported from solo RPG’s to attract solo players, as was so much else. It made as much sense to what MMO’s where as adding treasure hunt game elements to a solo rpg, or puzzle solving elements to a racing game.

    I do not think everything that came from solo game design was a disaster. But it was unplanned, not an attempt to find the best of both worlds. It was simply putting in as many solo game features to appeal to the bigger solo game player base as possible.

    Many solo features did not fit well or were an antithesis to MMO gameplay. And so today we have a bastard MMO genre, ill conceived and showing it.

  • g4m3sh4rkg4m3sh4rk Fairfield, MTPosts: 40Member
    Originally posted by Scot

    I do remember when and it was great times. But I ask you this. Do you think in ten years time players will be saying:

     

    Do you remember when we had guilds?

    Do you remember when we had crafting?

    Do you remember when we had factions?

    Do you remember when we had grouping?

    Do you remember when we had money you could earn in game and everthing was not paid for with real money?

    Do you remember when you had vendors you could sell loot to?

    Do you remember when we did not all just stand in a lobby?

    Do you remember when we had raids?

     

    This is not a process that has stopped. It carries on and I don't think defenders of the modern easymode MMO quite get that.

    I remember Scot. And I will never be able to forget. 

  • maskedweaselmaskedweasel houston, TXPosts: 7,277Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Silverchild
    Originally posted by SnarlingWolf

    When the MMO genre was first formed there simply wasn't the mentality to get to max level ASAP and although some people crunched all the numbers to find the perfect builds, the majority just made and played what they wanted.

     

    Over the years the idea that you have to level the most efficient way and must play only the absolute best builds has creeped into the majority of the player base. But there are still those of us who make what we want and when groups won't let us in for being "non-optimal" we just shrug and move on until we find another open minded group.

     

     

    That was cool, but I dont think its a shift in gamers mentality that caused it, I think its a shift in game design.

     

    I mean, you could be a complete noob in UO and experience "high level content" right away if you had friends to take you there. I remember hunting dragons with a group when I was a complete noob, shooting with my bow and doing almost no damage. But hey, I was still helping, and I was having fun. So of course I had absolutely no pressure to level as fast as I can.

    Nowadays... can you even ENTER a high level dungeon as a low level character?

    Games have elvolved and put in place so much artificial restriction on content ( and even gear checks now!) that it does encourage players to try to reach the level cap ASAP to experience it.  Its only normal.

    I think thats kind of the problem though,  in many games you really do get sectioned off from everyone.  Like the issue in GW2 right now where there are a lot of areas with no people in them... even though you're supposed to be able to do everything you can at end game, from level 1 (minus dungeons but still)  it still sections off so much of the population.  And in that way, a lot of the content gets forgotten.   

     

    Theres nothing that attaches you to anything when you tier gameplay, because you're always looking to the repetitive end, because its really all that matters.   None of the other players or areas matter, there are no homes or shops to come back to...  

    "Loan me a Dragon I wanna see space"


    image

  • Raithe-NorRaithe-Nor Moscow, IDPosts: 315Member
    Originally posted by maskedweasel

     

    I think thats kind of the problem though,  in many games you really do get sectioned off from everyone.  Like the issue in GW2 right now where there are a lot of areas with no people in them... even though you're supposed to be able to do everything you can at end game, from level 1 (minus dungeons but still)  it still sections off so much of the population.  And in that way, a lot of the content gets forgotten.   

    Theres nothing that attaches you to anything when you tier gameplay, because you're always looking to the repetitive end, because its really all that matters.   None of the other players or areas matter, there are no homes or shops to come back to...  

    People get sectioned off from each other because they WANT to be.  Do you think development companies started isolating their players from each other simply for the squeaks and giggles?  No, they did it emphatically and deliberately to lower their customer service requests.

    What happened to MMOs is very simple to understand.  The genre was invaded and conquered.  Probably a few times.  Less-than-wise developers didn't protest, either, because the invasion(s) put money in their pockets NOW instead of later.

    There is no place on this planet where this should be more evident than mmorpg.com.  It should only take about two or three thread readings for someone to say, "Wow, these people don't listen to each other and say things that are polar opposites from each other."

    It's because we don't like each other, don't want the same things from our entertainment, and shouldn't be forced to interacting with each other.  If you don't understand yet, setup a checkerboard with chess pieces on one side and try to play against each other.

  • nariusseldonnariusseldon santa clara, CAPosts: 22,441Member
    Originally posted by Raithe-Nor
     

    People get sectioned off from each other because they WANT to be.  Do you think development companies started isolating their players from each other simply for the squeaks and giggles?  No, they did it emphatically and deliberately to lower their customer service requests.

    Yeah. People don't like to congregate as much as some may imagine.

    What happened to MMOs is very simple to understand.  The genre was invaded and conquered.  Probably a few times.  Less-than-wise developers didn't protest, either, because the invasion(s) put money in their pockets NOW instead of later.

    More like adapted to the larger market. Oh, i think the devs are very wise. Why works for 10k players, when you can work for 10M? Better financial reward. Larger audience. More fans. Higher satisfaction.

    There is no place on this planet where this should be more evident than mmorpg.com.  It should only take about two or three thread readings for someone to say, "Wow, these people don't listen to each other and say things that are polar opposites from each other."

    It's because we don't like each other, don't want the same things from our entertainment, and shouldn't be forced to interacting with each other.  If you don't understand yet, setup a checkerboard with chess pieces on one side and try to play against each other.

    Very true. That is the key. There is no we .. and there are many preferences of what is good entertainment.

     

  • MukeMuke BredaPosts: 2,172Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by maskedweasel

     

     

    What happened to those times?

    still there, since I pay for my own accounts I play by my rules. :)

    not catering to any FOTM class or what a 'leader' wants for their endgame pve content.

     

    playing to please someone else = ruining fun and ends in cancelling subscriptions.

    "going into arguments with idiots is a lost cause, it requires you to stoop down to their level and you can't win"

  • Raithe-NorRaithe-Nor Moscow, IDPosts: 315Member
    Originally posted by nariusseldon

    Yeah. People don't like to congregate as much as some may imagine.

    Was that supposed to be funny?  If not then you missed the entire point of my post.  Some people most definitely like to congregate, especially if the congregation is of like-minded individuals with a similar recreational purpose in mind.  The only reason that separation is becoming far more prevalent is because the industry is trying to appease and maintain playerbases composed of parasitic, traditional, generic, and exploitative playstyles, together under the same roof.

    More like adapted to the larger market. Oh, i think the devs are very wise. Why works for 10k players, when you can work for 10M? Better financial reward. Larger audience. More fans. Higher satisfaction.

    There is only one game on the entire planet that can claim 10 million concurrent subscribers, and I'm not entirely sure it currently qualifies (even though once it could have boasted 12 million).  Your statement is once again unintentionally hilarious because 10k subs is actually a VERY common number for many mainstream MMOs.  The world hasn't gotten smaller in the last decade.  The competition may have gotten more robust, but technological availability has risen exponentially.

    No, your thinking is entirely wrong.  Trying to appeal to everyone simultaneously has never produced a viable product  and would certainly not be categorized as wise.

  • mysticalunamysticaluna Scotia, NYPosts: 265Member Uncommon

    You can see on World of Warcraft's Cross Realm Zones how people don't want to congregate together when forced.  By forcing servers to merge together in zones people can't properly play together because they are on different servers, and everyone is strangers fighting against each other for solo mob spawn rates.  Why make the content solo and force people to compete for it? On a PVE server it makes no sense.  For Blizzard to justify Cross Realm Zones, they need to make the mobs elite quality group mobs again, because all they did was up competition, while the mobs are so easy peesy, that they die in one hit... 

    Especially, if you happen to be doing low level quests that you missed out on as a max level 90, and they all die in one hit, yet you have to compete and group up with other 80-90's due to lack of spawn rates? Harvesting is painful now that zone populations have increased, and you have to deal with people phasing in on your harvest node, that you didn't see becaus they were invisible to you!! 

    Not to mention,  the nightmare that doing Eternal Vale dailys has become, there are 20 or so people doing solo quests, fighting each other over mob spawns, when the zone should scale up to be group/raid quests, why have 20 people soloing against each other on a PVE server? 

    They do need to learn scaling content technology, solo mobs should only exist if there's 1 person, not to be over camped by a high level or multiple people mass exterminating them with 0 challenge factor... There need to be harder elite group/raid mobs out in the world... Sha's are cool in Pandaria, but that doesn't make up for the solo-centric content in the entire rest of Azeroth!! 

    Stuff like simply finding rare names up in the world is now much harder with higher numbers of people in a zone, crowds made making a pandaren monk a nightmare, people on beta couldn't even do their quests thanks to overcrowding. Crowds ruin everything, they ruin immersion and fun, you need to segregate players to an extent, in order  to reduce lag and make a game playable ... 

    Once they figure out how to scale up mob difficulty to number of players or player's level however, we can end this max high levels annihilating gray low level trash content... 

    So, yeah, games need to give options, ways to avoid daily grinds, instead of enforce them on everyone, ways to seperate the community and reduce crowds, give people more to do and not force them all into a new expansion, bring more life into older content... 

  • Raithe-NorRaithe-Nor Moscow, IDPosts: 315Member
    Originally posted by mysticaluna

    So, yeah, games need to give options, ways to avoid daily grinds, instead of enforce them on everyone, ways to seperate the community and reduce crowds, give people more to do and not force them all into a new expansion, bring more life into older content... 

    Another person that I have no business addressing because we shouldn't even be using the same internet forum.

    Just to make it clear for passer-bys, the type of separation you are talking about is not the same as the lack of communical association that the OP is concerned with.  Your problem seems to stem from poor server management and an abundance of virtual greed among what is undoubtedly an overly power-hungry population.

    Once upon a time, people actually sought out interaction with other players simply for the sake of the interaction and fun.  It wasn't to camp mobs together or sell a high level raid token.  While such interaction still exists to a degree, it has degraded substantially in recent times and is arguably much lower calibur.

    But thanks for reminding me (and probably a few others) why I don't want to be playing your type of MMO...

  • FreezzoFreezzo EnschedePosts: 235Member

    Just to respond to the first page: I miss the feeling of coming into the server (logging in ofc) and saying hi to my guild and tradechat and I'd know about 40-50% of the active people on the server. Of course we have to move on, but looking back that's what I liked the most. The game itself sucked, but the community and the optional grouping (though highly encouraged for more experience... a full grinding party of 7 gave bonus xp, about 80% of what a duo got) with benefits was great. It was socialise or be a slowpoke...

     

    Edit: I'd like to add that the solo generation (as I call it) has ruined it for me. People who prefer to go through the content solo, because they don't want to be bothered by others, should play singleplayer games. They like the feel of MMOs, but they don't get what the game is about. Just my 2 cents :P These people really annoy the hell out of me

    "We need men who can dream of things that never were." - John F. Kennedy
    And for MMORPGs ever so true...

  • ScotScot UKPosts: 5,769Member Uncommon
    Players are "sectioned of" to help the servers cope with so many people. It has nothing to do with players not wanting to play with other players. Please point me to the threads in MMO's where players are complaining they see too many people when playing their MMO. Threads like that do not exist because in a MMO players want multiplayer, if you are a solo game player who wants every game to have only solo gameplay, you may not want multiplayer but we do.
  • EnerzealEnerzeal WarringtonPosts: 326Member

    I still do a large amount of what you stated in Eve.

    To be honest though you are right, completely. Using world of warcraft as an example. Now I can smash my face into the keyboard and beat monsters, there is very little challenge to be had while you level up. The levels come incredibly fast, and the areas are done with in an hour. I Don't need to interact with anyone else as I level up, not one person is needed to get to end game. If I do group up, my quest experience remains the same, but the exp generated is often as much as I get for killing monsters, which is greatly nerfed by grouping up.

    If I group up I have to slow down for my leveling partners leveling rate, I have to slow down to fit their schedule, afks etc. I have to also share quest items from monsters, yes some games have figured ways around this, but lots still have not.

    Now everyone is fixated on end game, I shouldn't say everone, the majority of people are. The best content, the most challenging content, the better loot, the better abilities, it's all locked away there. Even for crafters.

    Taking everquest as an example now, original everquest.

    I began grouping up at about level 10, working with others to kill much more difficult monsters. My progress was quicker, and we chatted to each other while we did it. Because it was difficult to progress through these areas, I used to love how getting deeper into it and seeing more was a challenge, but because it was a challenge, seeing more was so much more entertaining.

    Today the very idea of difficult monsters as you level up is horrific, any thought of making it take a long time is considered grindy.

    In what world should it be that the end game of an MMO is considered the game? And the levels leading upto it considered a anoying thing that we must grind through.

    Now this thread talks about whats missing now from our MMOs, and so many fools have said it's because we're all nostalgic fools, well what I just listed are facts, hard facts. No nostalia there.

    P.S To the person who said Final Fantasy 7 is nostaligia and not so great of a game, false. I have returned several times and each time I have been more than happy with the gameplay I got. Go ahead and tell me baldur's Gate 2 isn't as good as the current crop of RPGs and my reason for classifying it as one of the late great RPGs is that I am nostaligic...

  • Raithe-NorRaithe-Nor Moscow, IDPosts: 315Member
    Originally posted by Scot
    Players are "sectioned of" to help the servers cope with so many people.

    Not what the OP is talking about.  You can divide a playerbase up into manageable servers without isolating groups and individual soloers from each other.  The only games that don't have multiple prospective servers are typically games that don't use a lot of instancing and allow for a very high degree of interaction.

     

    Originally posted by Scot
    Please point me to the threads in MMO's where players are complaining they see too many people when playing their MMO.

    How about this one, four posts up from yours.  If you don't see that people want to be isolated from other incompatible playstyles, it's probably because you are a griefer and precisely the person they want to be isolated from.

  • GrixxittGrixxitt New Orleans, LAPosts: 543Member

    Something to ponder since social interaction (and the lack thereof) is brought up so much on this board, is how can game developers possibly go about pleasing everyone.

    Basically you have 3 groups, those that want instant PvE content, the soloists, and the people that want a more robust social experience. 

    I have my own ideas and, tbh, I should have made a seperate thread about this but I'm a bit short on time this morning :(

     

    (tbc)

    The above is my personal opinion. Anyone displaying a view contrary to my opinion is obviously WRONG and should STHU. (neener neener)

    -The MMO Forum Community

  • MaelwyddMaelwydd CrawleyPosts: 1,123Member

    Talking about social stuff..

     

    I got told I was unsociable today because I didn't use Facebook and twitter. I said I prefered talking to people face to face rather then using a computer and that Facebook and twitter do not make you a social animal...they laughed...I cried.

  • wallet113wallet113 normal, ILPosts: 231Member
    Originally posted by Bossalinie
    I totally use notepad and nothing else to make websites!

    LOL i remember when I did that too.

     

  • VincerKadenVincerKaden Edison, NJPosts: 457Member
    Originally posted by maskedweasel

     

    Do you remember ...

    When you would log in to an MMO just to be in a different world?

     

    When you would hang out in Taverns/Cantinas just to socialize?

     

    When you would create a character build based on what you wanted rather then what was "viable"?

     

    When a game would launch and would not be 100% perfect and that would be OKAY?

     

    When you would group up with players for the fun of completing content instead of the rewards?

     

    When you would become friends with those you grouped with instead of dropping them when the quest is over?

     

    When getting to max level was the least of your concerns?

     

    When playing that MMO was more of an experience then "just another game"?

     

    When you could leave a game amicably instead of it being a "failure" or that you "regret buying it"?

     

    When you would play a game regardless of its payment model because you enjoyed it?

     

    When the MMO Experience was actually FUN?

     

    What happened to those times?

    Yes. Yes, I do remember SWG pre-CU.

    My best guess as to what happened: game companies sensed there was a profit to be made, and that the MMO demographic was only reaching a portion of the video game market at large.

    Most MMOs now are glossy, easily accessible, "hold your hand" affairs that take little to no time to understand. There are some exceptions, I'm sure. But the corporate machine is driving MMOs to market sooner then they should be, lacking depth and content that veteran MMO-ers have come to expect.

    The result is a lifeless game that bleeds the initial playerbase and sends the developers scrambling to reach their pre-launch levels of hype and excitement. Meanwhile, the masses are moving on to the "next big thing", rinse and repeat.

    And yet we play. Is it out of fun, or is it our undying quest to recapture what may never be again?

    We're as much to blame as the developers. We know we should stop, but we do not. Someone will get it right, won't they? Sure. Now, just enter your credit card here, download the client, and go enjoy the most dynamic and innovative MMO experience ever released! (Until the next one).

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