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[Column] General: Content Locusts Aren’t the Problem

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  • shavashava Somerville, MAPosts: 282Member Uncommon

    The fundamental error I see in this analysis is that your "content locusts" don't generally value content.


    They get into a game pre-launch if they can, race to level cap without reading a scrap of quest content if they can skip it for efficiency, and then gain style points minimizing the endgame/PvP and bitching about the failings of the balance and mechanics on every game forum on the web.

     

    Since they often come with well organized multi-game (short attention span) guilds, the guild leaders are invited to puffed up summits to "fix" the game in beta and earl y launch, but they move on anyway.



    Loud and outspoken, they dominate forums and influence the press because that's their metagame. And in toto, crafters, explorers, socializers, any other play style is left as a silent plurality, unserved.



    It's killing the industry that a fashion has emerged that it is more cool to rush to level cap in AAAs and then trash them publicly in social media and move on.



    It means that the strategy of  over-hyping the box, getting a few heavy months of subs, then going f2p is actually the only reasonable minimaxed strategy to pay for a AAA production.


    Because hell, no one is going to settle for lame graphics or incremental development (minecraft aside). The MMO piranha want something near-excellent to diss.

     

    No, not content locust.  MMO piranha.  Leaving bloody scraps in their wake, including a mangled playerbase that likes the game that's shutting down, or laying off devs who then can't produce new content or maintain what they've made.

  • SuprGamerXSuprGamerX Montreal, QCPosts: 531Member

     Sorry , but I need to disagree on "Content locusts not being a bad thing". It is a bad thing , I mean c'mon now , if you're planning on playing a game just to rush through content and getting the hell out then please stick to solo console games.  Besides EVE-Online that delivers a non level cap system and great economy , I see no other MMO trying to do what CCP did what EVE-Online. 

     

      And what "next hotness" are we talking about? How many times do I need to say this? Take all releases within the past 5 years and there is no difference between all of them , except for the login screen and color of the sky. That's about it.  If Guild Wars 2 was called for example Cup Wars 2 , the game would of had negative 5$ sale on release day. The real problem is people finding "awesomness" in a game that isn't that awesome in the first place , and the "hype" meter on this site shows how right I am.      My kind of MMO that I'm looking forward at trying is End Of Nations , why? Because it's not like every other release!  It's something different!  And more Devs need to try something different.   I'm pretty sure that FF14 will still end up being a failure after all the "over hauls" , yet people are expecting it to be the next big thing the world have never seen before.  Please spare me God...!!!!

  • jbombardjbombard SapporoPosts: 531Member Uncommon
    I think the problem is that these games don't provide the customer any reason to stick around.  Can you really blame the player if you he/she is bored and wants to have fun so they move on to the next new thing.  If games want to retain players they have to provide customers with value CONTINUOUSLY.  Different players value different things so that often also entails a variey of different content.  Of course people leave free games that make it tedious to stick around unless you play x amount, people don't want to play to remove tedium they want to pay for fun.  I think most people are fine with buying content.  And yes people are going to leave p2p games if those games aren't providing enough value, it's common sense.  People don't want to throw money away regardless of how little, they want value for their money whatever they are purchasing.  People should leave a game the second they feel they are being short changed, it is the only power they have to change things.   If game developers want to keep players they need to provide value.  If they can't provide enough value to keep players coming back, then perhaps that is what they should concentrate on addressing.
  • BurntvetBurntvet Baltimore, MDPosts: 2,945Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by evilastro
    Originally posted by Burntvet

    And yet, none of the things mentioned in the article will stop MMORPG.com from having dozens of features/articles/columns/previews/anything else hype and praise the next "themepark of the week" to the skies.

    We have seen it over and over again.

    How can the "themepark of the week" MMOs continue to garner such heavy coverage and positives reviews, at this site and others, and then crash 2-3 months after launch?

     

    Just because sandboxes promote longevity in a game, doesnt mean that themeparks are bad games.  MMORPG.com reports on all upcoming games, it is hardly their fault that there are more themeparks than sandboxes. Sandboxes are hard to make, and often financially unviable.

    Sandbox fans need to stop being such negative Nancy's and start accepting the diversity of interests in the genre. Follow games you like, ignore ones you don't. The industry doesn't revolve around you.

    Nice in theory, but the gaming press, including MMORPG.com hypes up these mediocre games EVERY TIME.

    Not occasionally, not once or twice, but all the time.

    And not with 3 or 4 articles, but 20? 30? More than 100 in TOR's case, for example.

    And then the games tank a couple months in, after glowing reviews, that seem to miss all the reasons these games crash, while over emphasizing whatever positive aspects there are.

    The reviewers can't see the shortcomings? The shallow play? The same game mechanics for the Nth time? The same quests and the same classes? Have these people never played an MMO before? (If so, what are they doing reviewing them in the first place).

    And yet, the big scores keep rolling in.

     

    And whether or not I am a sandbox fan, has nothing to do with any of that.

     

    This article takes issue with the shortcomings of recent MMOs.

    I take issue with the gaming press not mentioning or noticing these shortcomings when they overrate and hype the mediocre games we have been seeing.

     

  • haplo602haplo602 Posts: 212Member Uncommon

    Quite well written, but not exactly spot on. Content locusts are a problem in the sense that they give the standard for minimum play time the game offers. What happens to perspective subscribers when they see articles and forum posts like 2 days to reach level cap ? This is very destructive for any MMO.

     

    Now I am not a veteran MMO player (only played a few and realy stayed only with EVE), but I am not the typical casual player either. I like to explore the game without it bugging me about anything (I hate the way RIFT anounces events f.e.). Also I like to study a game system (I contracted this disease in EVE). What I'ce seen lately is that you are not allowed to see much into the future of your character. The skill descriptions are unclear, there's almost no help on the stat systems etc. So I realy can't do much more than to follow the quest path created by the devs.

     

    We are forced to turn into content locusts. And it seems many people are slowly getting stomach aches :-)

     

    I do not agree with the Foundry system being any kind of a solution. There are very few good designers but many loud and bad critics :-)

  • bliss14bliss14 eleva, WIPosts: 565Member

    I thnk people don't realize the sheer amount of people that stick with games sometimes..  It's considered a failure here if a game holds 200k people as active players. 

    Thas is two hundred thousand men, women and boys...and some little girls.  Some games have more, some have less but if you have somewhere in that vicinity of people that is a shitload of people.

  • Crazy_StickCrazy_Stick Privacy Preferred, NCPosts: 1,059Member

    There is more than one reason we need developers to make games. It's all well and good to support the notion of enabling players to create their own game content by means of editors and Cryptic like foundry tools to make missions. However, you will end up with the same issues that have reared their ugly head with every game that has tried it. You will have a very few gems amidst a ton of utter CRAP and a slew of exploitive missions to loot or level you up by means of skipping any actual content. It becomes self defeating because the quiet line of MMO gaming is that if a mechanic or system can be exploited or cheated then it will be.

     

    The only thing that keeps MMORPGs going is a variety of options to keep you entertained in one package. That's partly why they warrant a subscription. Once you start specializing then the game becomes something else. You might as well create a MOBA.

     

    I am not afraid of content devouring players and simply see it as a by product of modern theme park game design. Everything is on rails and some people can speed along them better than others. To me, it's just another sign that people may well be too good at and too worn out by the same play model we keep seeing over and over. Regretfully if I honestly knew how to buck the trend I’d go cash in rather than write about it here. :)

  • Loke666Loke666 MalmöPosts: 18,000Member Uncommon

    I have to agree, but I think part of the problem is also that you can play one MMO a long time with rather repetetive content, it is after that you get tired and dont feel to do it again. That is how Wow pulled it off, the large percentage of its players were new to the genre.

    And adding player created content is indeed the easiest way to solve longviety. Another is more competetive PvP but that becomes better as well if you mix it with player created content.

    I believe that the next generation of MMOs will have at least partly player created content one way or another. The real problem is to make this attractive to both soloplayers and guildplayers.

    I dont think NWNs idea of player created dungeons is the best way, I rather have guild owned dungeons were other guilds try to solve the dungeons, in a PvE server would those dungeons be populated by hired in or collected monsters while on PvE servers players would populate them instead. Make it so that the guilds earn money based on how far they get into others dungeons and their own dungeon would generate some cash depending how well it stop others to solve it.

  • IndromeIndrome NortheimPosts: 292Member

    The secret to a game's longevity seems to crystallize as "player-made content". How neo-classic.

    image

  • VesaviusVesavius BristolPosts: 7,645Member Uncommon
    I have been a champion for player made content and a strong arguer for a focus on housing etc for a long long time. It's nice to be in tune with the zeitgeist at last.
  • RocknissRockniss Youngstown, OHPosts: 1,034Member
    Here is what's happening and its not just limited to video games. I saw a news clip from the Today show the other day. The clip was titled as a question. The question was pretty close to if not " Are people getting dumber?" Well the short answer to that is yes. And before any baby boomers come on here and talk about next generations, the baby boomers generation "self proclaimed workaholics" you guys were fed your careers on a silver platter, your parents, our grandparents, fought hard to get what they had (see WW2) you just came along for the ride and they held your hands from the begining. So don't think your exempt from the 50+ year span of " the dumb generation"
  • MumboJumboMumboJumbo LondonPosts: 3,221Member
    Originally posted by Burntvet

    And yet, none of the things mentioned in the article will stop MMORPG.com from having dozens of features/articles/columns/previews/anything else hype and praise the next "themepark of the week" to the skies.

    We have seen it over and over again.

    How can the "themepark of the week" MMOs continue to garner such heavy coverage and positives reviews, at this site and others, and then crash 2-3 months after launch?

    This strikes at the heart of the mmorpg genre for me^. It does not even have to be a crash if a transient userbase (ie high value to immigration/ emmigration turn-over even if it's positive and not negative!).

    An idealistic opinion of mmorpgs: Each one caters to a specific community of players. But - when massively = transient crowd where ironically everyone else is also transient (locusts is neat analogy: there for the crops before the next field): The quality of the game is never going to be that exceptional for what it potentially could be imo.

    Instead of locusts we need ants!

  • ZorgoZorgo Deepintheheartof, TXPosts: 2,226Member
    Originally posted by MumboJumbo
    Originally posted by Burntvet

    And yet, none of the things mentioned in the article will stop MMORPG.com from having dozens of features/articles/columns/previews/anything else hype and praise the next "themepark of the week" to the skies.

    We have seen it over and over again.

    How can the "themepark of the week" MMOs continue to garner such heavy coverage and positives reviews, at this site and others, and then crash 2-3 months after launch?

    This strikes at the heart of the mmorpg genre for me^. It does not even have to be a crash if a transient userbase (ie high value to immigration/ emmigration turn-over even if it's positive and not negative!).

    An idealistic opinion of mmorpgs: Each one caters to a specific community of players. But - when massively = transient crowd where ironically everyone else is also transient (locusts is neat analogy: there for the crops before the next field): The quality of the game is never going to be that exceptional for what it potentially could be imo.

    Instead of locusts we need ants!

    I've always wondered if it is because the reviews are written at the height of the 'newness' factor of an mmo. The review is released before the reviewer starts seeing the real cracks in the armor, before the emotional connection to the game wears off. Y'know, that feeling most of us have for the first month or two of playing a game - then the review comes out, and its glowing. Then the players and the reviewers start realizing the game is NOT all that great around the same time......tooo late, the review is out. Why didn't the reviewer realize this? Same reason the players don't for several weeks into game play.

    Just a theory.

    Maybe one of the reviewers here could comment. Have any of you ever regretted your review after a few more weeks of gameplay?

  • TheLizardbonesTheLizardbones Arkham, VAPosts: 10,910Member


    Originally posted by MumboJumbo
    Originally posted by Burntvet And yet, none of the things mentioned in the article will stop MMORPG.com from having dozens of features/articles/columns/previews/anything else hype and praise the next "themepark of the week" to the skies. We have seen it over and over again. How can the "themepark of the week" MMOs continue to garner such heavy coverage and positives reviews, at this site and others, and then crash 2-3 months after launch?
    This strikes at the heart of the mmorpg genre for me^. It does not even have to be a crash if a transient userbase (ie high value to immigration/ emmigration turn-over even if it's positive and not negative!).

    An idealistic opinion of mmorpgs: Each one caters to a specific community of players. But - when massively = transient crowd where ironically everyone else is also transient (locusts is neat analogy: there for the crops before the next field): The quality of the game is never going to be that exceptional for what it potentially could be imo.

    Instead of locusts we need ants!




    We don't have enough ants. It's also not cost effective to build games for the ants. So we get games for locusts.

    I can not remember winning or losing a single debate on the internet.

  • FusionFusion VaasaPosts: 1,391Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by Burntvet

    And yet, none of the things mentioned in the article will stop MMORPG.com from having dozens of features/articles/columns/previews/anything else hype and praise the next "themepark of the week" to the skies.

    We have seen it over and over again.

    How can the "themepark of the week" MMOs continue to garner such heavy coverage and positives reviews, at this site and others, and then crash 2-3 months after launch?

     

    Advertising is what the company runs on > tons of coverage and biasness on said advertisement deals. 

    Un-bias and lots of coverage are not possible on an advertisement funded sites, that's just the cold fact. You cannot be 100% honest if you wan't to get more funding from advertisement deals in the future.

     

    After all, sites like this are just businesses after all, they might've started with an honest agenda, but they need butter for their breads at the end of the day.

    Currently playing: -

    Waiting for: Class4.

    Dead and Buried: ESO, NWO, GW2, SWTOR, Darkfall, AO, AC2, Vanguard, CoH/V, EnB, EVE, Neocron, FE, EQ, EQ2, DAoC, FFXI, FFXIV, SWG, WoW, and billions of eastern junks!

  • TithenonTithenon Fountain, COPosts: 109Member

    Yes, there's a such thing as content locusts, but I agree they are not the problem, only the symptom of something that needs to be done in the MMO industry.  The tight control over content, listed in this article, is the problem.  Developers need to take a tabletop role-player viewpoint, I think; in tabletop, you have the main purpose of an adventure, the waypoints and minor adventure 'stepping stones' -which is what most MMORPGs now call 'quests' (shudder)- to get to the main event, side tasks and character upkeep (spending experience, purchasing reload equipment such as arrows, components, etc., visiting family and friends for advice, aid, and extra gear they have accrued while the character's been away), and random encounters. 

     

    In MMOs, you have the main 'quest' which, in all honesty, is nothing more than a small task, at least, or a small task in a longer chain, at best.  The latter is rarely done, and so the content locusts come along, grind their character from 0 to 60 in a week, and move on; it's not their fault the developers are so short-sighted.

     

    On top of, and adding to that, is the fact that people do call little tasks quests, when the word quest should be at the top of a chain...

     

    Quest

    Campaign

    Adventure

    Task/Objective

     

    The word quest speaks to a very large task that is going to have many parts toward completion.  The character is supposed to travel through difficulty, catharsis, a long road and a long time, to arrive at this point.  In role-playing terms, a quest should consist of between one and three campaigns, a campaign should consist of between two and five adventures, an adventure should consist of between one and five tasks or objectives.  A task is your FedEx, kill, collect, and travel 'quests' which take between two and thirty minutes to do IN the MMORPG.

     

    This adds to the lack of meaningful ANYTHING in the MMORPG, because your 'quests' are thirty minutes long, INCLUDING travel time, with no truly random encounters.  Which is another thing I've been wanting to address these past couple of days on here...

     

    Not every single creature in the game has to be placed in a zone BEFORE game release!  For pity's sake, you're going to have some creatures, yes, that will be in their natural habitat, but these should be IN ADDITION TO pop-up creatures that spawn just over the next hill, or deep in the forest, when your player comes to call on that area.  These creatures need to be geared toward the player-character, not the player-character having to be geared to the zone before they can enter and explore it.  Come now, it's ridiculous that I -such as in Warhammer Age of Reckoning- move into a zombie-infested area and barely kill two zombies before they're respawning, each of them slightly more powerful than I am.  Why should I be restricted to zones my character, no matter how s/he is spec'd, can handle, why aren't the creatures in the zones popping up around corners, over hills, and in the woods my character is able to handle, based on my character's presence?  Hmmm?

     

    I'm an explorer, I want to explore, that's my thing, and if you, the developer, are going to take some time to develop this absolutely beautiful world, I want to see it.  "Sod the quest," as Superfluous would express!  Let me climb the mountains, see the rivers, etc.  Have things in the areas that are set as something of a boss -I hate that term, also-, and have that boss be scary as hell, but don't inundate the area with things I can't handle because I haven't earned the level to be there, yet.  Make many of the monsters/creatures in an area tune to my character, so I have conflict, yes, and so the adventure I'm on is challenging, yes, but not so I'm overrun with super-fast spawning -Warhammer- creatures that I have to earn the right to kill in the first place, please?

     

    I wish my notifications were working properly so I could see answers to my posts, but in some ways, I'm also glad I can't, because someone is going to disagree with me in such a way that will get my hackles up, and then I'll get banned, hehe.

  • MindTriggerMindTrigger La Quinta, CAPosts: 2,596Member
    Originally posted by BadSpock

    The problem people fail to admit is that the majority, the "modern" MMO gamer likes to consume content, and no game really has as much high-quality content as WoW.

    This is how the game has lasted 8+ years at #1.

    Constant change too. Nothing new right now? Wait a few weeks - there will be a new patch with new raids/dungeons and/or new dailies and factions or another holiday event that will last a few weeks.

    WoW stagnates horribly in the 6-8 or so month cycle before a new expansion is released, and yes I'm sure their sub numbers flucuate a lot in that time - but lots come back each and every time.

    No new game can compete with 8+ years of content additions.

    So the locusts come, devour, get bored and leave. Some go back to their old nest, some wait for the next meal.

    Point is - there is a lot to do in WoW outside of Raiding/PvP - is most of it kind of pointless? It's a video game - of course it's pointless.

    You are failing to bring the evolution of the MMO gamer into account.  While there are still lots of players who haven't grown tired of themeparks, and likely many who never will, more and more people are.

    If WoW (or WoW 2) was released today as a pure themepark, with all we know about themeparks now, it would have the same problems as the others do.  The difference was WoW brought in the mainstream market years ago, and set the standards that most other games would go on to offer after.  It is an anomaly as was mentioned in the article, and there are several reasons for it.

    You also don't address the growing number of players who woudn't stay today for all that 8 years worth of content development because they are tired of themepark game play in general.  I wouldn't.  I only finished about 25% of GW2 before I left because I was bored to death.  Same with Rift, TOR and other games over the past several years.

    I"m sorry, but if you think running out of content is the only problem these themeparks have, you are wrong friend.  The type of content and lack of systems in these games has grown stale and repetetive.  Yes, there will always be a market for it, but gamers do evolve and expect more sooner or later.  We are seeing that now from people who have had their fill of also-ran themeparks.

    A sure sign that you are in an old, dying paradigm/mindset, is when you are scared of new ideas and new technology. Don't feel bad. The world is moving on without you, and you are welcome to yell "Get Off My Lawn!" all you want while it happens. You cannot, however, stop an idea whose time has come.

  • BadSpockBadSpock Somewhere, MIPosts: 7,974Member
    Originally posted by MindTrigger
    Originally posted by BadSpock

    The problem people fail to admit is that the majority, the "modern" MMO gamer likes to consume content

    I"m sorry, but if you think running out of content is the only problem these themeparks have, you are wrong friend.  The type of content and lack of systems in these games has grown stale and repetetive.  Yes, there will always be a market for it, but gamers do evolve and expect more sooner or later.  We are seeing that now from people who have had their fill of also-ran themeparks.

    Certainly not the only problem - would never suggest such a thing.

    Big problem is that the only alternative the genre has thus far been presented with... is a lack of content - or the notion of "players as content."

    PvE in a sandbox generally = "lack of content" as the systems-based content they tend to champion is nothing more than randomized (as random as computer programming can truly be i.e. deterministic) repeat-offender grind content.

    Beyond that, you have "players as content" which requires both A) a desire for both positive and negative player interaction (cooperative vs competitive) and requires B) a critical mass of players to actually find content and create it.

    How many times in EvE have I (and I'm sure others) done low/Null sec roams and found absolutely zero fights? How many times do you find blob vs. 1-2 randoms? How many times do you find fun, challenging (fair) contests?

    Hell I had the same problems with finding players for open world PvP in WoW RIFT and TOR!

    Lack of systems in themepark has indeed grown stale and repetitive for some, myself included at times - but the content is always there on demand. It's like turning on the TV and going to the On-Demand menu - you might not find something you really enjoy but there is always SOMETHING there.

    Lack of content is just as bad a problem as lack of systems IMO.

    No one has offered up real solutions to either problem yet.

    The REAL answer is of course "sytems as content" - but that requires extremely complex systems.

    Thus far the only time that philosophy has really "worked' has been with A) player Housing and B) complex crafting/economies.

    "Worked" is highly relative though - some people simply could care less about housing and crafting/economies.

    No one has thus solved the "PvE in a Sandbox" conundrum - just as no one has thus far solved the problem of satiating the appetite of Content Locusts.

    PvP has always been the devs "answer" to the problem - as PvP is dynamic and complex - but PvP isn't for everyone.

    We need dynamic and complex PvE too.

  • LordZeikLordZeik mushu pork, NJPosts: 269Member Uncommon
    I once had a dream that a game could keep me interested after I hit cap level, and devoured most of what it had to offer. Looking for the promised lands game after game. I came to the conclusion that the next biggest game. Was simply just a composition of several other games before it X_x. Oddly, enough I seem to spend more of my time playing mmorpgs that are not translated into English. It seems Westernizing has killed some of the challenge. I can play a game in Malaysia or Korea. Wait for it to hit North America. Then all of a sudden it's like the game got lobotomized.



    This leaves me to believe that the faults partially lie elsewhere. Who makes the calls on what to tweak for these international games? I'd personally love to sit them down and tell them where they went wrong.... Anyways, more games on the horizon more small pockets of entertainment ahead. Here's looking towards the future? Or is it the past all over again.
  • IcewhiteIcewhite Elmhurst, ILPosts: 6,403Member
    Originally posted by Burntvet

    And yet, the big scores keep rolling in.

    Which tends to indicate that looking to others to do game evaluation for you is always a losing strategy, yes?  Particular others who are paid with advertising?

    What's that bleating sound?  Oh, another new game being released, there goes the herd.

    The biggest problem with having a vote is that not many will invest the enormous commitment of time and research that a truly intelligent excercise of the franchise requires.

    The biggest problem with reading review sites for opinions is?

    Self-pity imprisons us in the walls of our own self-absorption. The whole world shrinks down to the size of our problem, and the more we dwell on it, the smaller we are and the larger the problem seems to grow.

  • SleepyfishSleepyfish Ashville, NCPosts: 363Member

    You cant draw fruit flies unless you have rotten fruit. Or if you take a huge crap and dont flush for like a week. There are two problems one, the gear grinds are not even good gear grinds, its been a long time since gear grinders had a game as good as EQ or FF as far as challenge, we need a game that keeps them locked in dungeons for days and weeks not just a few horus so they will be so occupied they will stay the hell away from non gear grind mmorpgs and making stupid demands.

    Heres my case, I think the gear locusts make up probably about 200 to 300k total players, about the population of EQ2, as soon as they land everyone leaves dropping the population after a few months since no one but them wants the grind. Developers looking for fast money know they can get 500k starting  players that they bait and switch and the 200k locusts who come to, with tweaking they can get close to about 900k to a million maybe two million. Make their money and hand over development to the games production company like GW2 is starting to do with Nexon.

    A few of these developers need a few false advertisement lawsuits to put them out of business to end that crap and the locusts need to find a game to settle down on, so they can leave the rest of us the hell alone.

     
  • wordizwordiz Eugene, ORPosts: 464Member
    Only a limited resource can be threatened by locusts. Quit giving people dead ends and they can't devour a game.
  • evolver1972evolver1972 Port Orchard, WAPosts: 1,118Member

    I find it amazing that "it's the devs fault for not making enough content" when some players spend as much time in game as they would at a job, blow through content, and then complain there's not enough.

     

    I spend roughly 8-12 hours/week playing MMOs.  I always thought that was fairly typical.  I mean, how much of your life is wasted if you spend much more time "entertaining yourself".  Sure, if it actually is your job, obviously you spend a lot of time doing it, but if it isn't your job, then why should you complain when you spend that much time in it to find that after a month or whatever, "there's nothing to do".  I find that notion to be patently ridiculous.  Even more ridiculous is to blame it on the developers for "not making enough content".

    image

    You want me to pay to play a game I already paid for???

    Be afraid.....The dragons are HERE!

  • NildenNilden null, NBPosts: 1,284Member Uncommon
    Originally posted by wordiz
    Only a limited resource can be threatened by locusts. Quit giving people dead ends and they can't devour a game.

    This is exactly the problem and solution. This is why after getting max level on multiple characters in every major MMORPG since UO and EQ I play Minecraft.

    How to post links.

    "classification of games into MMOs is not by rational reasoning" - nariusseldon
    Love Minecraft. And check out my Youtube channel OhCanadaGamer

  • FaelsunFaelsun Brandon, MSPosts: 492Member

    The answer is simple how does one, kill locusts? If there were some way to thin the locust population and stagger their imprint on the world rather than the forced subjugation you have now. Maybe they would have to work a bit harder to attain the phat loots. You either do this with pvp or with PVE content so hard the thought of getting a dungeon cleared in a day is a distant dream, more like a couple of weeks. Then you give non locusts benefits or gear that locusts can't get doing locusts things and that also will thin the herd becuase they might have to compete in the actual game world and do something besides do dungeons, and spam local chat.

     

    Also topic is misleading, Of Course locusts are the problem.

     
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